• In this Wednesday June 13, 1973 file photo, President Nixon's National Security Adviser Henry A. Kissinger, left, and Le Duc Tho, member of Hanoi's Politburo, are shown outside a suburban house at Gif Sur Yvette in Paris after negotiation session. Founder of the Nobel Prize Alfred Nobel gave only vague instructions on how to select winners, leaving wide room for interpretation by the prize committees in Stockholm and Oslo. In 1973 U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and North Vietnamese leader Le Duc Tho were honored for their efforts to achieve a cease-fire in the Vietnam War in what’s become one of the most contentious awards in Nobel history. The Vietnamese leader refused to accept the award, Kissinger asked the U.S. ambassador to Norway to accept it for him, and the war dragged on for three more years. The prize was heavily criticized, particularly by those who opposed the Vietnam War and associated Kissinger with it. (AP Photo/Michel Lipchitz, file)

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  • Palestinians watch a speech by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas at the U.N. General Assembly shown on TV in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015. Abbas declared before world leaders Wednesday that he is no longer bound by agreements signed with Israel, and called on the United Nations to provide international protection for the Palestinian people. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

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  • In this Sept. 23, 2015 file photo, company logos of the German car manufacturer Volkswagen sit in a box at a scrap yard in Berlin, Germany. Who knew about the deception, when did they know it and who directed it? Those are among questions that state and federal investigators want answered as they plunge into the emissions scandal at Volkswagen that has cost the chief executive his job, caused stock prices to plummet and could result in billions of dollars in fines. Legal experts say the German automaker is likely to face significant legal problems, including potential criminal charges.  (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

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