• North Korea denounces UN condemnation, warns US of action

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — North Korea has denounced a U.N. Security Council statement condemning its four latest ballistic missile launches, calling it “a hostile act” perpetrated by the United States and warning that it could precipitate America’s “self-destruction.”

  • In this June 29, 2016 photo, the author and former intelligence official, who uses the name James Church in public, works on his laptop in a New York park. Writing under a pseudonym, the author looks at life inside North Korea through the eyes of Inspector O, a fictional Pyongyang policeman who loves his country despite its many failings. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    In North Korea, a hardboiled (and fictional) cop keeps watch

    NEW YORK (AP) — The hero, a police inspector, prowls a city known more for its political malevolence than its street crime. If you read the local newspapers, you could think it’s a city with almost no crime at all. There have been no murders reported there for years, no bank robberies, no muggings, no rapes.

  • North Korean Olympic athletes return home to low-key welcome

    PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — Members of North Korea’s Olympic team have returned home, greeted by a small crowd of family and friends.

  • In this Feb. 12, 2015 file photo, the Port of Los Angeles, with some cargo loading cranes in the upright and idle position, are seen in this view from the San Pedro area of Los Angeles. In this angry election year, many American voters are skeptical about free trade, or hostile to it. The backlash threatens a pillar of U.S. policy: The United States has long sought global trade. Economists say imports cut prices for consumers and make the U.S. more efficient. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

    WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A selection of issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans, in brief:

  • In this Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016, file photo, a South Korean army soldier watches a TV news program showing images published in North Korea's Rodong Sinmun newspaper of North Korea's ballistic missile believed to have been launched from underwater and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, at Seoul Railway station in Seoul, South Korea. The UN Security Council is strongly condemning four North Korean ballistic missile launches in July and August, calling them "grave violations" of a ban on all ballistic missile activity. A press statement approved by all 15 members Friday night deplored the fact that the North's ballistic missile activities are contributing to its development of nuclear weapon delivery systems and increasing tensions. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

    UN condemns 4 North Korean ballistic missile launches

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. Security Council strongly condemned four North Korean ballistic missile launches in July and August on Friday night, calling them “grave violations” of a ban on all ballistic missile activity.

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016, fie photo, TV screens show file footage of a North Korea's ballistic missile that North Korea claimed to have launched from underwater at the Yongsan Electronic store in Seoul, South Korea. North Korea has expressed anger at United Nations Security Council discussions over a statement denouncing the country's latest submarine-launched missile test. North Korean Foreign Ministry official Jon Min Dok said in an interview Saturday that the U.S.-led discussions at the U.N. were a "terrible provocation" and that the country is developing nuclear weapons because of "outrageous nuclear intimidation" by the United States. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

    N. Korea says UN condemnation of missile tests ‘provocation’

    PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — North Korea on Saturday expressed anger at United Nations Security Council discussions over a statement denouncing the country’s latest submarine-launched missile test.

  • In this undated photo distributed on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016, by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, visits the site of a submarine-launched missile test at an undisclosed location in North Korea. Independent journalists were not given access to cover the event depicted in this image distributed by the Korean Central News Agency via Korea News Service. Kim said Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016, that his country had achieved the "success of all successes" in launching a missile from a submarine, saying it effectively gave the country a fully equipped nuclear attack capability and put the U.S. mainland within striking distance. Associated Press Photo Editors have detected evidence of photo manipulation on Kim Jong Un's face in this image. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

    NKorea missile test adds to ‘Military First’ celebration

    PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — North Korea marked its “Military First” holiday on Thursday with mass dancing, outdoor concerts and boasts of a successful — and potentially game-changing — submarine-launched ballistic missile test it hopes will serve as a warning to Washington and Seoul to stop holding joint military exercises Pyongyang sees as a dress rehearsal for invasion.

  • UN to consider statement on North Korea missile launch

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. Security Council agreed at an emergency meeting late Wednesday to consider issuing a statement on the latest North Korean missile launch.

  • TV screens show file footage of a similar North Korea's ballistic missile that North Korea claimed to have launched from underwater at the Yongsan Electronic store in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. A North Korean ballistic missile fired from a submarine Wednesday flew about 500 kilometers (310 miles) in the longest flight by that type of weapon, Seoul officials said, a range that can place much of South Korea within its striking distance. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    North Korean submarine missile launch shows improved ability

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said Thursday that his country had achieved the “success of all successes” in launching a missile from a submarine, saying it effectively gave the country a fully equipped nuclear attack capability and put the U.S. mainland within striking distance.

  • Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida, center, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, left, and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se pose for the photographers before their trilateral meeting in Tokyo, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The foreign ministers of China, Japan and South Korea have criticized North Korea's fresh missile launch just hours earlier in the day. (Katsumi Kasahara/Pool Photo via AP)

    Japan, China, S. Korea ministers slam N. Korea missile test

    TOKYO (AP) — The foreign ministers of China, Japan and South Korea made a rare display of unity Wednesday to sharply criticize North Korea’s latest submarine missile test.