• The Doctors Without Borders hospital is seen in flames, after explosions in the northern Afghan city of Kunduz, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. Doctors Without Borders announced that the death toll from the bombing of the group's Kunduz hospital compound has risen to at least 16, including 3 children and that tens are missing after the explosions that may have been caused by a U.S. airstrike. In a statement, the international charity said the "sustained bombing" took place at 2:10 a.m. (21:40 GMT). Afghan forces backed by U.S. airstrikes have been fighting to dislodge Taliban insurgents who overran Kunduz on Monday. (Médecins Sans Frontières via AP)

    Doctors Without Borders leaves Afghan city after airstrike

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The U.S. and Afghan governments vowed Sunday to jointly investigate the attack on a hospital in Kunduz that killed 22 people, as street-by street battles continued between government forces and Taliban fighters and officials warned of a looming humanitarian crisis for civilians trapped in the city

    Updated: 6:30 pm

  • Nonprofit continues fight against Lucas Museum in Chicago

    CHICAGO (AP) — A nonprofit group has filed an updated complaint in federal court as part of its efforts to keep filmmaker George Lucas from building a museum along Lake Michigan in Chicago.

    Updated: 2:31 pm

  • The Latest: Container found that may be from missing ship

    NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — The latest on the search for a cargo ship missing off the coast of Bahamas (all times local):

    Updated: 6:30 pm

  • Albuquerque police to buy property for seized vehicles

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Albuquerque police could get the funds to purchase a property for storing hundreds of vehicles seized during DWI arrests, a city official said.

  • Shortage of guards taking toll on New Mexico prison staff

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico officials say challenges in recruiting and maintaining corrections officers is causing large staffing shortages across state prisons.

  • Firefighters work at the at the scene of an explosion at a three-story building in the Borough Park neighborhood in the Brooklyn borough of New York, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. Fire Commissioner Daniel Nigro says the explosion apparently happened after a stove was disconnected. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    New York City explosion kills 1, hurts 3; gas leak suspected

    NEW YORK (AP) — Debris is being removed from a Brooklyn building where an apparent gas explosion killed a woman and injured three others.

  • Rear Adm. Scott Buschman, commander of the Coast Guard 7th District, receives an update brief for the missing cargo ship El Faro at the Coast Guard 7th District in Miami, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. The ship was heading from Jacksonville, Fla, to San Juan, Puerto Rico when it was battered by waves. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Jon-Paul/U.S. Coast Guard via AP)

    Bermuda whipped by weakening Hurricane Joaquin

    HAMILTON, Bermuda (AP) — Bermuda was lashed Sunday by gusting winds and pelting rains from a weakening Hurricane Joaquin as its spinning center tracked just west of the wealthy financial haven and tourist destination after plowing through the Bahamas as a major storm.

    Updated: 4:21 pm

  • In this Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015, photo, provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, a U.S. aid worker looks out the window of an Air Station Miami HC-144 Ocean Sentry aircraft to observe damage caused by Hurricane Joaquin in the Bahamas. The HC-144 aircrew flew over several islands to survey and document damage. (Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark Barney/U.S. Coast Guard via AP)

    The Latest: Joaquin weakens to Category 2 storm

    HAMILTON, Bermuda (AP) — The latest on Hurricane Joaquin and the storm’s predicted path. (All times local):

    Updated: 4:48 pm

  • Cyclist flies off road, dies during California charity ride

    SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP) — An amateur cyclist was killed after losing control on a winding California mountain road during Levi’s GranFondo charity ride, an event founded by former national champion Levi Leipheimer, authorities said.

    Updated: 5:14 pm

  • In this photo taken Sept. 16, 2015, BYU goalie Rachel Boaz, left, and midfielder Paige Hunt pose for a photo in Provo, Utah. Female college athletes like Rachel and Paige interrupted their college careers and went on LDS Church missions when the church changed the minimum age to 19. Many of these athletes are now returning to courts, fields and arenas, and having a big impact on college sports in the state. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP) DESERET NEWS OUT; LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

    Women’s college sports adjusts to missionary age change

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The effects of a new, lower age for Mormon missionaries rippled through college women’s sports in Utah as players departed to serve, and now three years later many are returning to the field and making their presence felt.