• Students at the University of New Hampshire have lunch at the new $17,000 custom-made chef's table, top, at the campus dining hall Friday April 29, 2016 in Durham, N.H.  The University of New Hampshire now acknowledges that spending $17,000 on a custom-made chef's table with LED lights for the campus dining hall was a mistake. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    University: Paying $17,570 for dining hall table was mistake

    DURHAM, N.H. (AP) — The University of New Hampshire now acknowledges that spending $17,000 on a custom-made chef’s table with LED lights for the campus dining hall was a mistake.

  • The controlled gate is seen at the Federal Aviation Administration's technical center near Atlantic City Tuesday, April 26, 2016, in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but only five states, including New Jersey, are actively monitoring for the chemicals used in the foam and spilled by other sources. New Jersey officials say they're focused on the Federal Aviation Administration's technical center near Atlantic City, where PFCs, known as perfluorinated compounds, have been found in groundwater and in low levels in municipal wells near the center's fire training area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    Most states do bare minimum on fire-foam contamination

    The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but most states so far show little inclination to examine civilian sites for the same threat.

  • British Cycling suspends technical director over comments

    MANCHESTER, England (AP) — The British cycling team is in turmoil ahead of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics after the sport’s local governing body suspended its long-time coach for allegedly making discriminatory remarks to riders.

  • In this Friday, April 22, 2016 photo, a jar containing a strain of marijuana nicknamed "Killer D" is seen at a medical marijuana facility in Unity, Maine. A growing number of health experts and law enforcement officials are making the case that marijuana could help reduce the numbers of overdoses and redirect money into fighting heroin and other opiates. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    Could marijuana help treat painkiller and heroin addiction?

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The growing number of patients who claim marijuana helped them drop their painkiller habit has intrigued lawmakers and emboldened advocates, who are pushing for cannabis as a treatment for the abuse of opioids and illegal narcotics like heroin, as well as an alternative to painkillers.

  • In this Friday, April 15, 2016 photo, Heather Retberg feeds chickens at the Quill's End Farm in Penobscot, Maine. The farm represents a way of life she said needs to be protected from an aggressive regulatory structure that keeps small farms from getting food to local people. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    Legal defeat only emboldens ‘food sovereignty’ soldiers

    PENOBSCOT, Maine (AP) — Heather and Phil Retberg’s Quill’s End Farm is idyllic to the point of New England cliche. Dairy cows, milked by hand, share space with goats and ducks near a wooden barn that overlooks a rolling green field and the summit of nearby Blue Hill.