• In this Nov. 2, 2015 photo, 30-year-old Bhagwati Chauhan, who gave birth to a Canadian couple's child on Oct. 27, touches the 9-month pregnant belly of 35-year-old Chandrika Makwana, who is carrying twins for an American couple, at the Akanksha Clinic, one of the most organized clinics in the surrogacy business, in Anand, India. Chauhan, whose husband died recently, plans to use the money she will earn as a surrogate to buy a house and send her son to school. The Indian government recently banned surrogate services for foreigners and ordered fertility clinics to stop the practice of hiring Indian women to bear children for them. (AP Photo/Allison Joyce)

    Surrogates feel hurt by India’s ban on foreign customers

    NEW DELHI (AP) — For thousands of childless couples the world over, India has been the go-to destination to fulfill their dreams of becoming parents, thanks to its well-trained doctors, well-appointed fertility clinics and vast numbers of poor women willing to serve as surrogate mothers.