• In this Nov. 23, 2015, photo, a pair of bear hunters walk up the road towards the sign marking a game commission's deer hunter focus area at Pennsylvania state game lands 74 in Fisher, Pa. The Pennsylvania Game Commission hopes the more than 30 of these areas across the state will draw more hunters to spots where they’re likely to see more deer when rifle season opens Monday (Nov. 29). Meanwhile, game commission foresters are hoping hunters will kill enough deer to safeguard the rebounding forest vegetation meant to attract deer to the focus areas in the first place. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

    Deer here: Game commission to steer hunters to prime spots

    FISHER, Pa. (AP) — Yo, hunters! Deer here.

  • Paula Swedeen, a forest policy specialist for the Washington Environmental Council, poses for a photo as she walks through forest land adjacent to Mount Rainier National Park on Monday, Nov. 23, 2015, near Ashford, Wash. The land is part of a new project of 520 acres on private timberland that allows the private nonprofit Nisqually Land Trust to sell so-called "carbon credits" to individuals and companies - including Microsoft Corp. - who are hoping to offset their carbon footprints. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Washington project ensures forest stores carbon for decades

    SEATTLE (AP) — Half a small forest still standing near Mount Rainier faced clear-cutting before an effort in Washington state saved the decades-old trees and allowed Microsoft to help finance the project to offset its carbon footprint.

  • A laborer walks past piping at a desalination test facility on the outskirts of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, on Monday, Nov. 23, 2015. Authorities took journalists on a tour of the facility to show ways the United Arab Emirates, which relies heavily on desalinated seawater for its drinking water, is trying to make the process more environmentally friendly. (AP Photo/Jon Gambrell)

    Parched Emirates relies on sea as groundwater runs out

    ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — As skyscrapers and gleaming towers rose with lightning speed across the United Arab Emirates over the past two decades, the Gulf nation’s thirst for water grew at an enormous rate — so much so that today, it threatens to dry up all of the country’s groundwater in as little as 15 years, experts say.