• Obama signs stopgap spending bill that averts shutdown

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama has signed a short-term spending bill that averts a government shutdown and gives Congress and the president about 10 more weeks to fashion a longer-lasting budget deal.

  • Lawsuit claiming DEA paid New Mexico man in crack tossed

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by a New Mexico man who says federal agents wrongfully supplied him with crack cocaine, reigniting his addiction to the drug.

  • In this Wednesday Sept. 23, 2015 file photo, Burkina Faso coup leader Gen. Gilbert Diendere, center, greets people at the airport during the arrival of Niger's President Mahamadou Issoufou for talks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Burkina Faso's army took over the barracks of the presidential guard that carried out a short-lived coup this month, barraging them with gunfire Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015 after they refused to disarm, the government said. Gen. Gilbert Diendere, who led the coup earlier this month but handed power back last week, called on his followers to lay down arms. (AP Photo, File)

    Burkina Faso coup leader in Vatican Embassy

    OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso (AP) — The military general who led the short-lived coup in Burkina Faso has sought refuge at the Vatican Embassy, a day after the army opened fire on his supporters in the presidential guard to force them to disarm, a person who works closely with the clergy said Wednesday.

  • This undated file photo provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections shows death row inmate Richard Glossip. In a 3-2 decision, the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals on Monday, Sept. 28, 2015, denied Glossip's request for an evidentiary hearing and an emergency stay of execution. The court ruled the state can proceed with Glossip's execution. (AP Photo/Oklahoma Department of Corrections, File)

    Man convicted of ordering boss’ killing set for execution

    McALESTER, Okla. (AP) — Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin postponed at the last minute Wednesday the execution of an inmate who claims he’s innocent, after prison officials said one of the three drugs they had received to carry out the lethal injection didn’t match state guidelines.

  • In this photo taken Tuesday, July 14, 2015, Bob Perkins, facilities manager at LightEdge Data Center, talks about the company's new data storage facility in Kansas City, Mo. LightEdge Solutions Inc. opened with the help of a projected $15.5 million in sales, income and property tax breaks. An Associated Press analysis of state revenue and economic-development records shows that government officials extended nearly $1.5 billion in tax incentives to hundreds of data-center projects nationwide during the past decade. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

    States competing for data centers extend $1.5B in tax breaks

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The former limestone mine seemed perfect for a large computer data center. The air was cool. The rock walls provided a defense against natural disasters. And the tunnels bored into a Kansas City hillside had access to abundant electricity and fiber-optic cables.

  • In this April 2, 2015, file photo, NCAA President Mark Emmert answers questions during a news conference at the Final Four college basketball tournament in Indianapolis. A federal appeals court agreed Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, that the NCAA's use of college athletes' names, images and likenesses in video games and TV broadcasts violated antitrust laws but struck down a plan to allow schools to pay players up to $5,000. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)

    Appeals court rules NCAA in violation of antitrust laws

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal appeals court agreed Wednesday that the NCAA’s use of college athletes’ names, images and likenesses in video games and TV broadcasts violated antitrust laws but struck down a plan to allow schools to pay football and basketball players up to $5,000 per year.

  • In this Sept. 14, 2015 file photo, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis makes a statement to the media at the front door of the Rowan County Judicial Center in Morehead, Ky. Davis, who refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, says she met briefly with the pope during his historic visit to the United States. Vatican officials did not respond to an email asking for comment early Wednesday, Sept. 30. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)

    Clerk jailed over gay marriage says pope encouraged her

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The private meeting Pope Francis held with defiant Kentucky clerk Kim Davis is a strong papal endorsement of religious resistance to gay marriage, but it doesn’t necessarily mean he approves of how she’s waged her fight, experts said Wednesday.

  • Judge: Family’s lawsuit against Stewart stays in central NY

    UTICA, N.Y. (AP) — A federal judge has ruled that a lawsuit against NASCAR driver Tony Stewart over the death of a driver he ran over during a race will remain in central New York.

  • Scolari pays $3.4M back taxes from time as Portugal coach

    LISBON, Portugal (AP) — Luiz Felipe Scolari has paid 3 million euros ($3.4 million) in back taxes from when he was Portugal coach between 2003 and 2007, the Portuguese authorities have announced.

  • Wednesday, September 30, 2015

    Russia says warplanes hit Islamic State and coordinated with US, denying criticism