• Appeals court denies New Mexico man’s e-filing fee complaint

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A federal appeals court has rejected a New Mexico man’s argument that e-filing fees in the state’s judicial system burdened his access to the courts.

  • Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan hold banners and waves their national flags, during a rally at Kizilay main square, in Ankara, Turkey, Wednesday, July 20, 2016.  U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is calling on Turkey to provide hard evidence that a U.S.-based cleric was behind a foiled coup attempt last weekend if it wants him extradited.  (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

    Experts: Restoring death penalty in Turkey would be risky

    ISTANBUL (AP) — Rights groups and legal experts said Wednesday that Turkey would be abandoning international rights conventions, and reverting to relics of military dictatorships if it reinstates the death penalty, which was abolished more than a decade ago.

  • In this Sunday, May 17, 2015 file photo, a Turkish police officer scans the area from a platform, backdropped by posters of Turkish Republic founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, left, and Turkey's current President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, during a political rally of AKP, The Justice and Development Party in Istanbul. Turkish lawmakers convened Thursday July 22, 2016 to endorse sweeping new powers for Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown in the wake of July 15 failed coup. The 550-member parliament is set to approve Erdogan's request for a three-month state of emergency. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, file)

    Turkish lawmakers set to approve 3-month state of emergency

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey will be able to extend detention times for suspects and issue decrees without parliamentary approval under a three-month state of emergency approved Thursday by lawmakers following last week’s attempted military coup.

  • In this Sunday, May 17, 2015 file photo, a Turkish police officer scans the area from a platform, backdropped by posters of Turkish Republic founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, left, and Turkey's current President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, during a political rally of AKP, The Justice and Development Party in Istanbul. Turkish lawmakers convened Thursday July 22, 2016 to endorse sweeping new powers for Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown in the wake of July 15 failed coup. The 550-member parliament is set to approve Erdogan's request for a three-month state of emergency. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, file)

    The Latest: Turkey detains more judges and military officers

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the situation in Turkey after the failed military coup last week (all times local):

  • In this Feb. 26, 2014, file photo, an election official checks a voter's photo identification at an early voting polling site in Austin, Texas. A federal appeals court ruled Wednesday, July 20, 2016, that Texas' strict voter ID law discriminates against minorities and the poor and must quickly be scrubbed of those effects before the November 2016 election. Voters will still need to show identification at the polls under the decision by the New Orleans-based 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, according to attorneys who challenged the law, but a lower court will now also have to devise a way for Texas to accommodate those who cannot. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

    Appeals court: Texas voter ID law discriminates; orders fix

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas’ strict voter ID law discriminates against minorities and the poor and must be weakened before the November elections, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday, following claims that at least a half-million registered voters could have struggled to cast a ballot.

  • A woman takes part in a pro-government rally in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The rebellion, which saw warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, was quashed by loyal government forces and masses of civilians who took to the streets. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    The Latest: Canada urges respect for law in coup aftermath

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the situation in Turkey after the failed military coup last week (all times local):

  • People wave Turkish flags as they gather in Taksim Square in Istanbul, protesting against the attempted coup, Wednesday, July 20, 2016.  Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared a 3-month state of emergency after a failed coup. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    Turkey widens crackdown after botched coup

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey’s president on Wednesday declared a three-month state of emergency following a botched coup attempt, declaring he would rid the military of the “virus” of subversion and giving the government sweeping powers to expand a crackdown that has already included mass arrests and the closure of hundreds of schools.

  • In this Sept. 24, 2013 file photo, Turkish Islamic preacher Fethullah Gulen is pictured at his residence in Saylorsburg, Pa. A lawyer for the Turkish government, Robert Amsterdam, said that "there are indications of direct involvement" in the Friday, July 15, 2016, coup attempt of Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim cleric who is living in exile in Pennsylvania. He said he and his firm "have attempted repeatedly to warn the U.S. government of the threat posed" by Gulen and his movement. (AP Photo/Selahattin Sevi, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: The cleric being blamed for Turkey coup attempt

    In a story July 15 about a Muslim cleric accused of being behind a coup attempt in Turkey, The Associated Press misspelled the Turkish president’s first name. He is Recep Tayyip Erdogan, not Recip Tayyip Erdogan.