• Bee advocates, pecan growers battle over pesticide request

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A plea from New Mexico’s pecan growers to use a restricted pesticide against insect infestations is drawing opposition from advocates for the honey bee.

  • FILE- In this Oct. 11, 2015 file photo, Nepal's Khadga Prasad Oli addresses the parliament before being appointed as the new Prime Minister in Kathmandu, Nepal. Oli has resigned before facing a confidence vote in parliament that he expected to lose. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha, File)

    Nepal’s prime minister resigns after losing majority support

    KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Nepal’s prime minister resigned on Sunday shortly before he was to face a confidence vote in parliament that he expected to lose, further aggravating political instability in the Himalayan country.

  • Today in History

    Today in History

  • The Latest: Judge inclined to deny Trump request

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — The latest developments on Donald Trump’s lawyers seeking to dismiss one of three lawsuits involving Trump University alleging the Republican presidential contender defrauded customers at the now defunct business (all times local):

  • Trump seeks to dismiss lawsuit over Trump University

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — A federal judge said Friday that he is inclined to deny a request by Donald Trump’s lawyers to dismiss a lawsuit that accuses the Republican presidential nominee of defrauding customers at the now-defunct Trump University.

  • Emails: Group asked governor for religious objections order

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Emails disclosed in a lawsuit over a blocked Mississippi law that protects religious objections to same-sex marriage show a Christian legal group asked Gov. Phil Bryant to institute the protections through an executive order in 2015.

  • Matthieu Reeb, General Secretary of the Court of Arbitration for Sport, CAS, speaks to journalists during the release of the decision in the case between the Russian Olympic Committee (ROC), 68 Russian athletes and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) in front of the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Lausanne, Switzerland, Thursday, July 21, 2016. The Court of Arbitration for Sport rejected the appeal of 68 Russian athletes seeking to overturn the ban imposed by the IAAF following allegations of state-sponsored doping and cover-ups.  (Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP)

    How Russia could challenge Olympic bans at CAS and beyond

    GENEVA (AP) — Much of the intense Olympic action before the Rio de Janeiro Games open in less than two weeks is set to play out in the law courts.

  • People attend Friday prayers in Fatih mosque, Istanbul, Friday July 22, 2016. Turkish lawmakers responded to an attempted coup by approving a three-month state of emergency that allows the government to extend detention times and issue decrees. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    Turkish city streets are calm after emergency declaration

    ISTANBUL (AP) — A top Turkish official on Friday accused the United States of “standing up for savages” by not immediately handing over a U.S.-based Muslim cleric who the government claims orchestrated last week’s failed coup. Speaking in Washington, President Barack Obama said there was a legal process for extradition and encouraged Turkey to present evidence.

  • Appeals court denies New Mexico man’s e-filing fee complaint

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A federal appeals court has rejected a New Mexico man’s argument that e-filing fees in the state’s judicial system burdened his access to the courts.

  • Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan hold banners and waves their national flags, during a rally at Kizilay main square, in Ankara, Turkey, Wednesday, July 20, 2016.  U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is calling on Turkey to provide hard evidence that a U.S.-based cleric was behind a foiled coup attempt last weekend if it wants him extradited.  (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

    Experts: Restoring death penalty in Turkey would be risky

    ISTANBUL (AP) — Rights groups and legal experts said Wednesday that Turkey would be abandoning international rights conventions, and reverting to relics of military dictatorships if it reinstates the death penalty, which was abolished more than a decade ago.