• The statue of Barbara Johns with her hand outstretched, stands behind Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe as he speaks during a ceremony dealing with the restoration of rights at the Virginia Civil Rights memorial at the State Capitol in Richmond, Va., on Monday, Aug. 22, 2016. McAuliffe announced that he again restored the voting rights of about 13,000 felons who served their time after his previous attempt was thwarted by Republican lawmakers and the state Supreme Court. (Bob Brown/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)

    Voting rights restored again for 13K felons in Virginia

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A defiant Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe announced Monday that he again restored the voting rights of about 13,000 felons who served their time after his previous attempt was thwarted by Republican lawmakers and the state Supreme Court.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    America’s oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into the World Trade Center — can remember the economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton ran for president. The younger end of the generation — now nearing 20 — can’t recall a time without terrorism or economic worry.

  • In this Sept. 5, 1995, file photo, first lady Hillary Clinton addresses the panel of women's health and security before addressing the U.N. World Conference on Women in Beijing. Flying across the Pacific on an Air Force jet bound for Beijing, first lady Clinton huddled deep into the night with a few aides and advisers, honing her speech for the U.N. Fourth World Conference on Women. It was 1995, and it had been a bruising first few years in the White House: Troopergate, Travelgate, Whitewater. (AP Photo/Greg Baker, File)

    Clinton identity on world stage helped by 1995 China talk

    NEW YORK (AP) — Flying across the Pacific on an Air Force jet bound for Beijing, first lady Hillary Clinton huddled deep into the night with a few aides and advisers, honing her speech for the U.N. Fourth World Conference on Women.

  • In this May 28, 2016, file photo, Tibetan exhibitors check on their phones at their booth displaying their products during the China International Fair and Trade in Beijing. Tensions have been rising over China’s assertive behavior in the seas of Asia. The U.S. also accuses China of unfair trading practices and cyber theft of business secrets. Donald Trump says that the sheer volume of trade gives the U.S. leverage over China. He accuses China of undervaluing its currency to make its exports artificially cheap and proposes tariffs as high as 45 percent on Chinese imports if Beijing doesn’t change its behavior. Such action could risk a trade war that would make many products in the U.S. more expensive. Clinton says the U.S. needs to press the rising Asian power to play by international rules, whether on trade or territorial disputes. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

    WHY IT MATTERS: China

    WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: Tensions have been rising between China and the United States. China is modernizing its military and pressing its sovereignty claims over the disputed South China Sea, an important route for global trade. The U.S. is pushing back by increasing its military presence in Asia, which China views as provocative. The U.S. also accuses China of unfair trading practices and cyber theft of business secrets. Tough action by either side could spark a skirmish at sea or a trade war that would make many goods in the U.S. more expensive.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    America’s oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into the World Trade Center — can remember the economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton ran for president. The younger end of the generation — now nearing 20 — can’t recall a time without terrorism or economic worry.

  • Today in History

    Today in History

  • In this Aug. 12, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gives a thumbs up as he leaves a campaign rally in Altoona, Pa. While Donald Trump's chief economic pitch is decrying foreign trade, the audience for his argument is shrinking by the day in the state most pivotal to his shot at the presidency. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

    In North Carolina, audience shrinking for Trump’s message

    ASHEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — Hillary Clinton “owes the state of North Carolina a very big apology,” Donald Trump thundered, condemning the loss of manufacturing jobs due to free-trade deals supported by the Democratic presidential nominee.

  • In this June 28, 1978, file photo, then New York Gov Hugh Carey points to an artists' conception of the new New York Hyatt Hotel/Convention facility that will be build on the site of the former Commordore Hotel, in New York. At the launching ceremony are, from left: Donald Trump, son of the city developer Fred C. Trump; Mayor Ed Koch of New York; Carey; and Robert T. Dormer, executive vice president of the Urban Development Corp. (AP Photo, File)

    Trump family values: bonding over bricks, mortar, politics

    WASHINGTON (AP) — There’s something about bulldozers and hard hats that brings a family together.