• Participants set the portraits of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a rally denouncing North Korea's nuclear test and missiles and North Korea's female military human rights in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, April 26, 2016. The rally is a part of an annual event called North Korea Freedom Week which held from April 24-30. North Korea is believed to have placed a new, powerful mid-range missile on standby for an impending launch, a news report said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    North Korea puts midrange missile on standby, report says

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea’s president said Tuesday that North Korea has almost completed preparations for a fifth nuclear test, and the country has reportedly placed a new midrange missile on standby for an impending launch.

  • Participants set the portraits of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a rally denouncing North Korea's nuclear test and missiles and North Korea's female military human rights in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, April 26, 2016. The rally is a part of an annual event called North Korea Freedom Week which held from April 24-30. North Korea is believed to have placed a new, powerful mid-range missile on standby for an impending launch, a news report said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Report: N. Korea puts mid-range missile on standby

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea is believed to have placed a new, powerful midrange missile on standby for an impending launch, a news report said Tuesday.

  • In this Oct. 1, 2014, file photo, Deputy Secretary of Defense Robert Work speaks at the Pentagon. The Pentagon thinks it has a winning argument for why Congress should allow a new round of military base closings. “Spending resources on excess infrastructure does not make sense,” Work wrote leaders of the relevant congressional committees on April 12. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

    A Washington ritual: Pentagon, Congress at odds over bases

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon thinks it has a winning argument for why Congress should allow a new round of military base closings. The case goes like this: The Army and Air Force have vastly more space for training and basing troops than they need, and trimming the surplus would save money better used to strengthen the military.

  • In this Aug. 12, 2015 file photo, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, right, leaves federal court in New York. A federal appeals court has ruled, Monday, April 25, 2016,  that New England Patriots Tom Brady must serve a four-game "Deflategate" suspension imposed by the NFL, overturning a lower judge and siding with the league in a battle with the players union. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Tuesday:

  • President Barack Obama speaks during the opening ceremony of the Hannover Messe Trade Fair in Hannover, Germany, Sunday, April 24, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Administration: Up to 250 military personnel headed to Syria

    AERZEN, Germany (AP) — President Barack Obama has decided to send up to 250 military personnel to Syria to help local forces fighting the Islamic State group.

  • A South Korean man watches a TV news program showing images published Sunday in North Korea's Rodong Sinmun newspaper of North Korea's ballistic missile that the North claimed to have launched from underwater, at Seoul Railway station in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, April 24, 2016. North Korea said Sunday that it successfully test-fired a ballistic missile from a submarine and warned of its growing ability to cut down its enemies with a "dagger of destruction." South Korea couldn't immediately confirm the claim of success in what marks Pyongyang's latest effort to expand its military might in face of pressure by its neighbors and Washington. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    N. Korea claims successful test of submarine-fired missile

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea said Sunday that it successfully test-fired a ballistic missile from a submarine and warned of its growing ability to cut down its enemies with a “dagger of destruction.” South Korea couldn’t immediately confirm the claim of success in what marks Pyongyang’s latest effort to expand its military might in face of pressure by its neighbors and Washington.

  • North Korea's Foreign Minister Ri Su Yong answers questions during an interview, Saturday, April 23, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

    AP Exclusive: N. Korea to halt nuke tests if US stops drills

    NEW YORK (AP) — North Korea is ready to halt its nuclear tests if the United States suspends its annual military exercises with South Korea, the North Korean foreign minister told The Associated Press in an interview in which he also warned that his country won’t be cowed by international sanctions.

  • North Korea's Foreign Minister Ri Su Yong answers questions during an interview, Saturday, April 23, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

    NKorea ready to halt nuke tests if US stops SKorea exercises

    NEW YORK (AP) — A day after North Korea’s foreign minister told The Associated Press that his country is ready to halt its nuclear tests if the United States suspends its annual military exercises with South Korea, President Barack Obama said Sunday that Washington isn’t taking the proposal seriously and Pyongyang would “have to do better than that.”

  • A man watches a TV news program showing a file footage of a missile launch conducted by North Korea, at the Seoul Train Station in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, April 23, 2016. North Korea on Saturday fired what appeared to be a ballistic missile from a submarine off its northeast coast, South Korean defense officials said, Pyongyang's latest effort to expand its military might in the face of pressure by its neighbors and Washington. The Korean letters at top left read: "North Korea fires a submarine-launched ballistic missile or SLBM." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Seoul: N. Korea appears to fire submarine-launched missile

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea said Sunday that it successfully test-fired a ballistic missile from a submarine and warned of its growing ability to cut down its enemies with a “dagger of destruction.” South Korea couldn’t immediately confirm the claim of success in what marks Pyongyang’s latest effort to expand its military might in face of pressure by its neighbors and Washington.

  • In this Saturday, April 16, 2016 photo, a woman shops at the Hamadiyah market, or souk in Arabic, that was named after the 34th Sultan of the Ottoman Empire Abdul Hamid II, in the Old city of Damascus, Syria. In Damascus, it is easy to forget the war beyond. The airstrikes, the ruins and starvation, sometimes only few miles away, seem distant and unseen. Since a partial cease-fire went into effect at the end of February, the mortar shells from opposition-held suburbs have stopped.  (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

    In Damascus, an uneasy stability boosts Syria’s Assad

    DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — Looking out from the Syrian capital these days, one can understand why President Bashar Assad would be in no hurry to make concessions at peace talks in Geneva, let alone consider stepping down as the opposition demands.