• In this March 16, 2016 file photo, a woman holds up a poster with a photo of slain environmental leader Berta Caceres during a protest in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Caceres reported receiving threats from DESA security personnel, as well as an attempt by a company official to bribe her to call off the demonstrations, according to Billy Kyte, a senior campaigner on land and environmental defense at London-based Global Witness. DESA, or Desarrollos Energeticos SA, is the company carrying out the Agua Zarca hydroelectric project that Caceres lead protests against. (AP Photo/Fernando Antonio, File)

    Court files show bid to tar slain Honduran activist Caceres

    TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) — For months before her death, environmental activist Berta Caceres complained of repeated threats warning her to stop leading protests opposing a hydroelectric project on her Lenca people’s ancestral lands.

    Updated: 2:08 pm

  • Guantanamo workforce to include SC National Guard unit

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Military police from the South Carolina Army National Guard have been ordered to prepare for a possible deployment to Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba as early as this fall, a Guard official said Tuesday.

    Updated: 1:07 pm

  • US Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, left, receives the rank pennant from US Air Force General Philip Breedlove, the outgoing commanding officer of US and NATO troops in Europe, during the change in command at the United States European Command (EUCOM), in Stuttgart, Germany, Tuesday, May 3, 2016, with General Joseph Dunford, second from left, and Command Master Chief Crispian Addington, second from right,  pictured in the background. (Marijan Murat/dpa via AP)

    Defense Secretary Carter: American killed in combat in Iraq

    STUTTGART, Germany (AP) — The combat death Tuesday of a U.S Navy SEAL who was advising Kurdish forces in Iraq coincides with a gradually deepening American role in fighting a resilient Islamic State, even as the Iraqis struggle to muster the military and political strength to defeat the militants.

    Updated: 1:02 pm

  • US Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter speaks during a press conference held after the change in command at the United States European Command (EUCOM), at the Patch Barracks in Stuttgart, Germany, Tuesday, May 3, 2016. (Marijan Murat/dpa via AP)

    Defense Sec’y Carter says Russia is ‘nuclear saber-rattling’

    STUTTGART, Germany (AP) — U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter blasted what the U.S. and its allies see as Russian aggression in Europe, saying Tuesday that Moscow is “going backward in time” with warlike actions that compel an American military buildup on NATO’s eastern flank.

    Updated: 12:20 pm

  • Palestinian journalists hold banners during a protest calling for the release of Palestinian journalist Omar Nazzal, who was arrested by Israeli authorities over the weekend, outside Ofer military prison near the West Bank city of Ramallah, Tuesday, April 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)

    Israel to hold Palestinian journalist 4 months without trial

    RAMALLAH, West Bank (AP) — Israel’s military on Monday ordered a well-known Palestinian journalist to be held for four months without charges or trial, in so-called administrative detention.

  • Rocket fire from Syria kills man in Turkish town

    ISTANBUL (AP) — Turkey’s state-run news agency says a rocket projectile fired from Syria has hit a Turkish border town, killing at least one person and wounding several others.

  • In this Jan. 16, 2014 file photo, OPCW (Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons) Director-General Ahmet Uzumcu talks during a press conference, in Rome. With about 92 percent of the world’s declared chemical weapons destroyed, the watchdog overseeing the elimination of poison gas and nerve agents is looking at how to counter emerging threats while still dealing with unfinished business in Syria. The OPCW is marking the anniversary of the entry into force of the Chemical Weapons Convention with a conference focusing on chemical security in a future in which extremists and criminals seem more likely than nations to launch attacks. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, File)

    As chemical weapons stockpiles shrink, OPCW eyes new threats

    THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — With about 92 percent of the world’s declared chemical weapons stockpiles destroyed, the watchdog agency overseeing the elimination of poison gas and nerve agents is looking now to counter emerging threats from extremist groups while still dealing with unfinished business in Syria.

  • Members of the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party arrive by bus for the launch of their municipal election manifesto, in Soweto, South Africa, Saturday, April 30, 2016. Fiery South African opposition politician Julius Malema told 40,000 cheering supporters that President Jacob Zuma should step down before the army turns on him because of the corruption allegations against him.(AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

    South Africa: Opposition leader warns president to step down

    JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Fiery South African opposition politician Julius Malema told 40,000 cheering supporters that President Jacob Zuma should step down before the army turns on him because of the corruption allegations against him.

  • This image made from undated militant video, shows Canadians John Ridsdel, right, and Robert Hall. Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau confirmed that the decapitated head of a Caucasian male recovered Monday, April 25, 2016, in the southern Philippines belongs to Ridsdel, who was taken hostage by Abu Sayyaf militants in September 2015. (Militant Video via AP Video) NO SALES, MANDATORY CREDIT

    After hostage beheading, is Philippines facing IS threat?

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Months before Abu Sayyaf militants beheaded retired Canadian mining executive John Ridsdel in the tropical jungles of the southern Philippines, they showed him pleading for life in a video with three other hostages that demanded a record-high ransom.

  • Han Yunhong, an official from the Public Security Bureau listens to questions during a press conference about a law regulating overseas non-governmental organizations held at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Thursday, April 28, 2016. China passed a much-debated law on foreign non-governmental organizations on Thursday in a move in which Beijing says would better serve the groups but critics are concerned would further restrict them by subjecting them to close police supervision. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    China passes law to tighten controls on foreign nonprofits

    BEIJING (AP) — China passed a law Thursday tightening controls over foreign non-governmental organizations by subjecting them to close police supervision, a move officials say will help the groups but critics charge is the latest attempt by authorities to clamp down on perceived threats to the ruling Communist Party’s control.