• This Wednesday, July 20, 2016 file picture shows soldiers patrolling the famed Promenade des Anglais in Nice, southern France. Since January 2015, IS-inspired attackers have killed at least 235 people in France, by far the largest casualty rate of any Western country. (AP Photo/Claude Paris, File)

    Many factors make France the top IS terror target in Europe

    PARIS (AP) — When militants loyal to the Islamic State group seek to inflict pain on Europe, France is their preferred target, a grim reality borne out yet again with Tuesday’s knife slaughter of a Catholic priest.

  • Bangladesh police say 9 militants killed in raid in Dhaka

    NEW DELHI (AP) — Police in Bangladesh’s capital raided a five-story building Tuesday and killed nine suspected Islamic militants, the country’s police chief said.

  • In this Tuesday, July 19, 2016 photo, an Afghan soldier guards a checkpoint on the Kabul-Jalalabad highway on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan. After two years of heavy casualties, the Afghan military is trying to retake the initiative in the war against militants with a new offensive next week, an assault that will see American troops back working more closely with Afghan soldiers. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

    After Obama’s green light, Afghan forces on the offensive

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — After two years of heavy casualties, the Afghan military is trying to retake the initiative in the war against militants with a new offensive next week against Islamic State group loyalists, an assault that will see American troops back on the battlefield working more closely with Afghan soldiers.

  • FILE- In this Nov. 9, 1947 file photo, Indian Sikh troops take up roadside positions on the Baramula Road to help force invaders further away from the Kashmir capital, Srinagar. A raid by armed tribesmen from north-western Pakistan forced Maharaja Hari Singh of the Himalayan kingdom of Jammu and Kashmir to seek help from India, which offered military assistance on the condition that the kingdom accede to India. The ruler accepted but insisted that the region would remain a largely autonomous state within the Indian union, with India managing its foreign affairs, defense, and telecommunication. The Indian military entered the region soon after, and the tribal raid spiraled into the first of two wars between India and Pakistan over Kashmir. The war ended in 1948 with a United Nations brokered ceasefire. (AP Photo/Max Desfor, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: For 69 years, Kashmir is torn by deadly strife

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — When news spread that Indian troops on July 8 had killed 22-year-old Burhan Wani, a charismatic commander of Indian-controlled Kashmir’s biggest rebel group, the public response was spontaneous and massive. Tens of thousands of angry youths poured out of their homes in towns and villages across the Himalayan region, hurling rocks and bricks and clashing with Indian troops.

  • FILE- In this Nov. 9, 1947 file photo, Indian Sikh troops take up roadside positions on the Baramula Road to help force invaders further away from the Kashmir capital, Srinagar. A raid by armed tribesmen from north-western Pakistan forced Maharaja Hari Singh of the Himalayan kingdom of Jammu and Kashmir to seek help from India, which offered military assistance on the condition that the kingdom accede to India. The ruler accepted but insisted that the region would remain a largely autonomous state within the Indian union, with India managing its foreign affairs, defense, and telecommunication. The Indian military entered the region soon after, and the tribal raid spiraled into the first of two wars between India and Pakistan over Kashmir. The war ended in 1948 with a United Nations brokered ceasefire. (AP Photo/Max Desfor, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: For 69 years, Kashmir is torn by deadly strife

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — When news spread that Indian troops had killed 22-year-old Burhan Wani, a charismatic commander of Indian-controlled Kashmir’s biggest rebel group on July 8, the public response was spontaneous and unprecedented. Tens of thousands of angry youths poured out of their homes in towns and villages across the Himalayan region, hurling rocks and bricks and clashing with Indian troops.

  • Supporters of Pakistan's religious group Jamaat-ud-Dawa raise their hands during an anti-Indian rally to express solidarity with Indian Kashmiris, in Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif vowed that his country would continue extending political moral and diplomatic support to Kashmiris. He urged his countrymen to observe "black day" to express solidarity with "Kashmiris who are facing atrocities at the hands of Indian forces." (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

    Pakistani militant leader pledges support to Kashmir rebels

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — The founder of the Pakistani militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba, Hafiz Saeed, pledged on Wednesday to support armed rebels in Indian-ruled Kashmir.