• The Solar Impulse 2 plane flies over Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, shortly before landing on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. The world's first ever round-the-world flight to be powered solely by the sun's energy made history with its landing in the Emirati capital, where it first took off more than a year ago. (AP Photo/Adam Schreck)

    Solar plane’s arrival highlights UAE’s clean-energy push

    ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The United Arab Emirates might not seem like an obvious spot to begin and end a globe-spanning flight promoting renewable energy.

  • In this Saturday, July 16, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee Fawaz al-Jasem pulls weeds on a tomato farm in Ramtha, Jordan. He's among thousands of displaced Syrians who recently obtained work permits as part of Jordan's promise to the international community to put 50,000 refugees to work legally by the end of the year in exchange for interest-free loans and easier access to European markets. So far, some 23,000 Syrians have been given work permits in the kingdom under the deal, aimed in part at keeping refugees in the region with a promise of jobs and education for their children, and deterring them from moving on to Europe. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    Jordan deal with donors means legal work for Syria refugees

    RAMTHA, Jordan (AP) — Syrian refugee Fawaz al-Jasem used to drop his tools and run when he saw police approaching the farm in northern Jordan where he has been picking vegetables for the past three years.

  • Russia's Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, left, talks with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry during the 6th East Asia Summit Foreign Minister's meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP photo/Sakchai Lalit)

    Kerry: Progress with Russia on Syria despite military doubts

    VIENTIANE, Laos (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said progress is being made with Russia on a potential military partnership that could strengthen a faltering truce in Syria despite grave doubts expressed by the Pentagon and joint chiefs of staff.

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  • Iraqi security forces and civilians gather at the scene of a bomb in Kadhimiyah district, Baghdad, Iraq, Sunday, July 24, 2016. A suicide bomber attacked a security check point in northern Baghdad on Sunday, killing and wounding people, Iraqi officials said. (AP Photo/Ali Abdul Hassan)

    Suicide bomber kills 14 at Iraq checkpoint; 9 die in Baghdad

    BAGHDAD (AP) — A suicide bomber rammed his explosives-laden car into a checkpoint outside a Shiite town north of Baghdad on Monday, killing at least 14 people, Iraqi officials said, while a string of bombings in the Iraqi capital killed nine more people.

  • UN calls for 48-hour humanitarian pause in Syria’s Aleppo

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Weekly 48-hour humanitarian pauses are urgently needed in Syria’s Aleppo city where fighting has left over a quarter of a million people trapped and in desperate need of aid, the U.N. humanitarian chief said Monday.

  • FILE- In this Saturday, July 23, 2016 file photo, German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives for a statement in Berlin, Germany, on the Munich attack. Four attacks in a week — three of them carried out by asylum seekers — have left Germany on edge and Chancellor Angela Merkel's policies of welcoming refugees under renewed criticism. Anxiety over Germany's ability to cope with last year's flood of more than 1 million registered asylum seekers first surged following a series of sexual assaults and robberies in Cologne during New Year celebrations.  (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

    German refugee policy under fire after a week of bloodshed

    BERLIN (AP) — Four attacks in a week — three of them carried out by asylum seekers — have left Germany on edge and Chancellor Angela Merkel’s policies of welcoming refugees under renewed criticism.

  • In this Thursday, July 14, 2016 picture, an Iraqi policeman uses a hand-held device that is supposed to detect bombs at a checkpoint in Basra, 340 miles (550 kilometers) southeast of Baghdad, Iraq. For nearly a decade, when you drove through one of Baghdad's seemingly endless checkpoints, a soldier would point a hand-held, gun-shaped device at your vehicle, intently watching if the antenna atop the device moved. If it pointed at your vehicle, the theory was, it had found a possible bomb. The wands were a fake, but it wasn't till a massive bombing this month that the government halted their use. (AP Photo/Nabil al-Jurani)

    Iraq finally bans fake bomb detectors after July 3 blast

    BAGHDAD (AP) — For nearly a decade, anyone driving through one of Baghdad’s many checkpoints was subjected to a search by a soldier pointing a security wand at their vehicle and watching the device intently to see if its antenna moved. If it pointed at the car, it had supposedly detected a possible bomb.

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