• In this Nov. 3, 2015 file photo, wind turbines dot the landscape near Steele City, Neb. Wind turbines and solar panels accounted for more than two-thirds of all new electric generation capacity added to the nation’s grid in 2015, according to a recent analysis by the U.S. Department of Energy. The remaining third was largely new power plants fueled by natural gas, which has become cheap and plentiful as a result of hydraulic fracturing. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)

    GOP states benefiting from shift to wind and solar energy

    WASHINGTON (AP) — If there’s a War on Coal, it’s increasingly clear which side is winning.

  • In this Wednesday, April 6, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, in Bethpage, N.Y. Trump says he would create coal-mining jobs as president, and he criticizes Hillary Clinton for saying “we’re going to put a lot of coal miners” out of work. Trump, however, has yet to explain exactly how he will revitalize Appalachia’s coal industry. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

    AP FACT CHECK: Bringing coal jobs back to Appalachia

    DALLAS (AP) — Donald Trump says he would bring back lost coal-mining jobs, and he is positioning for the November election in big coal states by portraying Hillary Clinton as a job killer.

  • In this undated photo provided the American Bald Eagle Foundation, a bald eagle perches on a tree branch along the Chilkat River within the Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve outside Haines, Alaska. The preserve is about 10 miles downstream from a copper and zinc prospect that could someday be developed into a hard rock mine. Critics say a spill from mining operations could harm salmon in the rivers of the preserve, where up to 4,000 eagles gather each winter to feed on the fish after they spawn. (Cheryl McRoberts/American Bald Eagle Foundation via AP)

    Critics question mine exploration near Alaska eagle preserve

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — In early winter, after most tourists have fled Alaska, another kind of visitor flies in: bald eagles, up to 4,000 of them.

  • Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton laughs with Scott Conley while talking to steelworkers in Ashland, Ky., Monday, May 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

    Once a Clinton stronghold, Appalachia now Trump country

    ASHLAND, Ky. (AP) — When President Bill Clinton rolled into the small Appalachian town of Ashland, Kentucky, in 1996, cheering crowds lined the streets. Local boy-turned-country music star Billy Ray Cyrus performed a special version of his hit, “Achy Breaky Heart” before nearly 20,000 supporters at a riverfront re-election rally.

  • In this Jan. 16, 2014 file photo, OPCW (Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons) Director-General Ahmet Uzumcu talks during a press conference, in Rome. With about 92 percent of the world’s declared chemical weapons destroyed, the watchdog overseeing the elimination of poison gas and nerve agents is looking at how to counter emerging threats while still dealing with unfinished business in Syria. The OPCW is marking the anniversary of the entry into force of the Chemical Weapons Convention with a conference focusing on chemical security in a future in which extremists and criminals seem more likely than nations to launch attacks. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, File)

    As chemical weapons stockpiles shrink, OPCW eyes new threats

    THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — With about 92 percent of the world’s declared chemical weapons stockpiles destroyed, the watchdog agency overseeing the elimination of poison gas and nerve agents is looking now to counter emerging threats from extremist groups while still dealing with unfinished business in Syria.