• New Mexico couple: Woman posed as humane worker, stole dog

    RIO COMMUNITIES, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico couple says a woman posing as an Animal Humane employee threatened them with jail and stole one of their dogs.

  • In this April 29, 2015 photo, actor Zhang Jinlai in a Monkey King costume poses next to a wax figure base on his stage performance during a ceremony at the Madame Tussauds in Beijing. The Year of the Monkey gives a little-needed excuse to reference the much loved Monkey King character from the 16th century adventure novel “Journey to the West.” The supernatural Monkey King, also known as Sun Wukong, accompanied a monk on a journey to retrieve sacred scriptures and the story has inspired countless TV shows and movies over the years. Unashamedly trying to capitalize on the new zodiac year, yet another Monkey King adaptation will be released on the first day of the lunar new year - Feb. 8. (Chinatopix via AP) CHINA OUT

    Monkey Year inspires kung fu, predictions of fire, disease

    BEIJING (AP) — The new Chinese year is the one to go bananas over. On Feb. 8, the zodiac calendar enters the Year of the Monkey — the ninth of 12 animal signs. Plastic monkeys are adorning shopping centers and office buildings, and government departments have been giving out toy monkeys.

  • New Mexico succeeds in legal fight to bar horse slaughter

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A court decision will prevent a horse slaughter operation from opening in New Mexico after the state’s lengthy legal battle.

  • 3 charged, 1 warning issued after deer beaten in Arkansas

    STUTTGART, Ark. (AP) — A Georgia man accused of beating a deer with an accounting textbook after it had been hit along an Arkansas highway has been charged with a misdemeanor count of cruelty to animals and wasting wildlife and set for a court appearance later this month.

  • In this Jan. 27, 2016 photo, children look at Hanako the elephant at Inokashira Park Zoo on the outskirts of Tokyo. An online petition drive wants the 69-year-old Hanako, or "flower child," to be moved to a Thai sanctuary, to live in a natural, grassy habitat where elephants romp in herds, not alone in her concrete pen, with a wading pool she hardly uses and a nearby side building to spend the night. It’s attracted tens of thousands of signatures already, with the aim of submitting them to the suburban Tokyo zoo and the Japanese government. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    Move sought for Japan’s oldest elephant may be too late

    TOKYO (AP) — In the humble zoo, among the small cages of owls, guinea pigs and raccoons, Japan’s oldest elephant stands in a concrete pen about the size of half of a basketball court. She drinks sugar water from a bucket and munches on bananas with her last remaining tooth while a debate is being waged about where she should live out her final years.