• The Doctors Without Borders hospital is seen in flames, after explosions in the northern Afghan city of Kunduz, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. Doctors Without Borders announced that the death toll from the bombing of the group's Kunduz hospital compound has risen to at least 16, including 3 children and that tens are missing after the explosions that may have been caused by a U.S. airstrike. In a statement, the international charity said the "sustained bombing" took place at 2:10 a.m. (21:40 GMT). Afghan forces backed by U.S. airstrikes have been fighting to dislodge Taliban insurgents who overran Kunduz on Monday. (Médecins Sans Frontières via AP)

    Doctors Without Borders leaves Afghan city after airstrike

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The U.S. and Afghan governments vowed Sunday to jointly investigate the attack on a hospital in Kunduz that killed 22 people, as street-by street battles continued between government forces and Taliban fighters and officials warned of a looming humanitarian crisis for civilians trapped in the city

    Updated: 6:30 pm

  • A student, member of the school marching band cries as she carries the coffin of her classmate and fellow band member Bryan Sandoval who died in a mudslide, to the Santa Catarina Pinula cemetery on the outskirts of Guatemala City, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. Hope faded Sunday for finding any survivors of a mudslide that killed at least 87 people as authorities said that hundreds more may still be missing. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

    Guatemala family loses 11 to mudslide, sees dreams end

    SANTA CATARINA PINULA, Guatemala (AP) — Hope faded Sunday for finding any survivors of a mudslide that killed at least 131 people as the smell of rotting bodies spread across the enormous mound of earth and rescuers reported the buried dwellings they reached were filled with water, suggesting anyone trapped inside would have drowned.

    Updated: 7:24 pm

  • In this Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, photo, Alabama Probate Judge Nick Williams laughs in a court room at the Washington County court house in Chatom, Ala. Williams, also a Baptist minister in Washington County, is among those who have stopped issuing any marriage licenses.   (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

    Alabama judges use segregation-era law to avoid gay marriage

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — As Alabama’s all-white Legislature tried to preserve racial segregation and worried about the possibility of mixed-race marriages in 1961, lawmakers rewrote state law to make it optional for counties to issue marriage licenses.

  • In this Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015 photograph, students study at Hopeworks ‘N Camden, a nonprofit organization that teaches high school students and young adults how to build websites and use software, in Camden, N.J. The group in one of the nation’s most impoverished places is planning its first hackathon to give teens and young adults in the city and professional programmers a chance to collaborate on solutions to local problems. The plan is to build new websites for some community groups and also to connect young Camden residents with area information technology professionals. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    Can youths in ‘hackathon’ help struggling city help itself?

    CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) — Can computer coding help turn this impoverished city around? One nonprofit group thinks so, and is bringing together youths and professional programmers for Camden’s first “hackathon” this weekend.

  • McKinley County allocates liquor tax funds for detox center

    GALLUP, N.M. (AP) — McKinley County commissioners have allocated liquor excise tax funds for a detox center in Gallup.

  • St. Paul mayor says protesters agree not to disrupt marathon

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Black Lives Matter St. Paul has agreed not to disrupt the Twin Cities Marathon during the rally the group is planning for Sunday, Mayor Chis Coleman said after talking with the group’s organizer on Thursday.

  • Mayor vetoes Albuquerque measure on marijuana penalties

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Mayor Richard Berry says he has vetoed an Albuquerque City Council measure to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana.

  • In this photo taken Tuesday, July 14, 2015, Bob Perkins, facilities manager at LightEdge Data Center, talks about the company's new data storage facility in Kansas City, Mo. LightEdge Solutions Inc. opened with the help of a projected $15.5 million in sales, income and property tax breaks. An Associated Press analysis of state revenue and economic-development records shows that government officials extended nearly $1.5 billion in tax incentives to hundreds of data-center projects nationwide during the past decade. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

    States competing for data centers extend $1.5B in tax breaks

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The former limestone mine seemed perfect for a large computer data center. The air was cool. The rock walls provided a defense against natural disasters. And the tunnels bored into a Kansas City hillside had access to abundant electricity and fiber-optic cables.

  • Four lifeguards from Barcelona, Spain, working as volunteers, help disembarking a dinghy as migrants and refugees arrive from the Turkish coasts to the northeastern Greek island of Lesbos, on Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015. The International Organization for Migration says a record number of people have crossed the Mediterranean into Europe this year, now topping a half a million, with some 388,000 entering via Greece. (AP Photo/Santi Palacios)

    The Latest: Czechs drill in preparation for influx

    PARIS (AP) — The latest developments as European nations struggle to cope with tens of thousands of people trekking across the continent to find safety. All times local:

  • New Mexico councilor in troubled city arrested at meeting

    SUNLAND PARK, N.M. (AP) — A councilor in a troubled New Mexico border city has been arrested on misdemeanor drug charges in the middle of a special council meeting.