• Congressman calls on New Mexico to help with water dispute

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico’s only Republican member of Congress has joined the fight between ranchers and the federal government over access to water on national forest lands, saying the state can do more to protect the private property and water rights of its citizens.

  • House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 25, 2016, during the committee's markup hearing on H.R. 5278, Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    Puerto Rico clears first hurdle with committee vote

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan deal to help Puerto Rico manage its crippling finances cleared its first hurdle Wednesday with approval from a Republican-led House committee.

  • This June 18, 2015, file photo, provided by the Charleston County Sheriff's Office shows Dylann Roof.  The Justice Department intends to seek the death penalty against Roof, the man charged with killing nine black parishioners last year in a church in Charleston, South Carolina, Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Tuesday, May 24, 2016. (Charleston County Sheriff's Office via AP, file)

    The Latest: Portrait to be unveiled of slain church pastor

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The Latest on a church shooting in Charleston about a year ago that left nine black members dead (all times local):

  • Creditors: Minnesota archdiocese sitting on $1.7 billion

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Attorneys on Tuesday accused a Minnesota archdiocese of sheltering more than $1 billion in assets to avoid big payouts to abuse survivors as part of the church’s bankruptcy case.

  • Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., speaks with Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 19, 2016, before joining a bipartisan group of senators at a news conference to discuss legislation to improve the federal regulation of chemicals and toxic substances.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    House set to approve bill to regulate toxic chemicals

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Tuesday easily approved a bipartisan bill that would for the first time regulate tens of thousands of toxic chemicals in everyday products from household cleaners to clothing and furniture.

  • In this June 10, 2013 file photo, Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr. speaks in Trenton, N.J.  Pallone has found that National Football League officials improperly sought to influence a government study on the link between football and brain disease. Pallone's report says the league tried to strong-arm the National Institutes of Health into taking the project away from a researcher that the NFL feared was biased.  (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

    NFL doctor sends strong response to House report

    SEATTLE (AP) — The co-chairman of the NFL’s head, neck and spine committee has sent a letter to Congress stressing that he was not contacted during a government study on the link between football and brain disease.

  • Louisiana set to expand hate crimes law to include police

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana is poised to become the first state in the nation to expand its hate-crime laws to protect police, firefighters and emergency medical crews.

  • House Judiciary Committee members, Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, left, and Rep. Ron DeSantis, R-Fla., are sworn in Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 24, 2016, prior to testifying before the Judiciary Committee's hearing on allegations of misconduct against IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    House panel hearing lawmaker who wants IRS chief impeached

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans gave an election-year airing to their complaints about IRS chief John Koskinen Tuesday, telling a GOP-run House committee that he should be impeached for lying to lawmakers and destroying evidence.

  • In this May 10, 2016, file photo, Jerry Ilo holds a gun that he uses to teach the Hawaii Department of Natural Resources hunter education training course in a classroom in Honolulu. Ilo was one of several Hawaii residents to speak out against a bill passed by lawmakers to allow Hawaii gun owners to be registered in a federal database that will automatically notify police if an island resident is arrested anywhere else in the country. (AP Photo/Marina Riker, File)

    Hawaii could be first to put gun owners in federal database

    HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii could become the first state in the United States to enter gun owners into an FBI database that will automatically notify police if an island resident is arrested anywhere else in the country.

  • New Mexico probes its handling of emergency food aid

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The practice of altering emergency food assistance applications that results in delayed benefits may date back more than a decade, New Mexico lawmakers were told Monday.