• Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert departs the federal courthouse Wednesday, April 27, 2016, in Chicago, after his sentencing on federal banking charges which he pled guilty to last year. Hastert was sentenced to more than a year in prison in the hush-money case that included accusations he sexually abused teenagers while coaching high school wrestling.  (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    The Latest: Dennis Hastert arrives at court for sentencing

    CHICAGO (AP) — The Latest on the sentencing of former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert (all times local):

  • Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert departs the federal courthouse Wednesday, April 27, 2016, in Chicago, after his sentencing on federal banking charges which he pled guilty to last year. Hastert was sentenced to more than a year in prison in the hush-money case that included accusations he sexually abused teenagers while coaching high school wrestling.  (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Dennis Hastert awaits sentence in hush-money case

    CHICAGO (AP) — Dennis Hastert, the Republican who for eight years presided over the House and was second in the line of succession to the presidency, was sentenced Wednesday to more than a year in prison in a hush-money case that revealed accusations he sexually abused teenagers while coaching high school wrestling.

  • From left, Valeant's outgoing CEO, J. Michael Pearson; former chief financial officer Howard Schiller; and billionaire investor William Ackman, whose hedge fund holds a large stake in Valeant and controls two seats on its board of directors, are sworn in on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 27, 2016, prior to testifying before the Senate Special Committee on Aging hearing on drastic price hikes by Valeant and a handful of other drugmakers that have stoked outrage from patients, physicians and politicians nationwide. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Valeant CEO will cite ‘mistakes’ in price-hiking strategy

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers accused Valeant Pharmaceuticals of gouging patients to reward Wall Street investors during a hearing Wednesday scrutinizing the embattled drugmaker’s pricing tactics.

  • Protesters head into the Legislative building for a sit-in against House Bill 2 in Raleigh, N.C.,  Monday, April 25, 2016. While demonstrations circled North Carolina's statehouse on Monday, for and against a Republican-backed law curtailing protections for LGBT people and limiting public bathroom access for transgender people, House Democrats filed a repeal bill that stands little chance of passing. (Chuck Liddy/The News & Observer via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    North Carolina Dems pan ‘keep our state straight’ comment

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Rhetorical skirmishes continued Tuesday in North Carolina over a law limiting protections for LGBT people, as Democrats criticized a Republican’s plea to “keep our state straight.”

  • In this Friday, April 22, 2016 photo, a jar containing a strain of marijuana nicknamed "Killer D" is seen at a medical marijuana facility in Unity, Maine. A growing number of health experts and law enforcement officials are making the case that marijuana could help reduce the numbers of overdoses and redirect money into fighting heroin and other opiates. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    Could marijuana help treat painkiller and heroin addiction?

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The growing number of patients who claim marijuana helped them drop their painkiller habit has intrigued lawmakers and emboldened advocates, who are pushing for cannabis as a treatment for the abuse of opioids and illegal narcotics like heroin, as well as an alternative to painkillers.

  • Protesters head into the Legislative building for a sit-in against House Bill 2 in Raleigh, N.C.,  Monday, April 25, 2016. While demonstrations circled North Carolina's statehouse on Monday, for and against a Republican-backed law curtailing protections for LGBT people and limiting public bathroom access for transgender people, House Democrats filed a repeal bill that stands little chance of passing. (Chuck Liddy/The News & Observer via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    LGBT debate spurs arrests at North Carolina statehouse

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A day of protests and arrests around North Carolina’s statehouse marked what’s likely to be weeks of impassioned debate over a law limiting protections for LGBT people.

  • Abortion rights’ advocate looks to amendment recount

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — An amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that would place greater restrictions on abortions is likely to be tossed out now that a judge has ordered a recount of the 2014 ballot approving it, the lead plaintiff in a federal lawsuit challenging the results said Monday.

  • Don’t like orange? Hunters will be able to wear pink instead

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Hunting in fluorescent pink could soon become a Louisiana trend.

  • Delaware justices to hear arguments on death penalty law

    DOVER, Del. (AP) — Delaware’s Supreme Court has scheduled oral arguments on the constitutionality of the state’s death penalty.

  • In this Oct. 1, 2014, file photo, Deputy Secretary of Defense Robert Work speaks at the Pentagon. The Pentagon thinks it has a winning argument for why Congress should allow a new round of military base closings. “Spending resources on excess infrastructure does not make sense,” Work wrote leaders of the relevant congressional committees on April 12. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

    A Washington ritual: Pentagon, Congress at odds over bases

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon thinks it has a winning argument for why Congress should allow a new round of military base closings. The case goes like this: The Army and Air Force have vastly more space for training and basing troops than they need, and trimming the surplus would save money better used to strengthen the military.