• In this Sept. 9, 2015, file photo, Debbie Ziegler holds a photo of her late daughter, Brittany Maynard, as she receives congratulations from Ellen Pontac, left, after a right-to die measure was approved by the state Assembly in Sacramento, Calif. California will become the fifth state to allow terminally ill patients to legally end their lives using doctor-prescribed drugs after Gov. Jerry Brown announced Monday, Oct. 5, 2015 he signed one of the most emotionally charged bills of the year. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

    California governor signs hard-won right-to-die legislation

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — In a rare personal message, California’s 77-year-old governor provided insight into his deliberations before deciding to sign a bill allowing terminally ill Californians to legally take their own lives, reflecting on religion and self-determination as he weighed an emotionally fraught choice.

    Updated: 2:03 am

  • Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks about the agreement on the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal at Abe's official residence in Tokyo, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

    United States, 11 Pacific Rim countries reach trade deal

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States and 11 other Pacific Rim countries reached a contentious trade pact that cuts trade barriers, sets labor and environmental standards and protects the intellectual property of multinational corporations. Now each country must sell the deal to skeptical lawmakers.

    Updated: 10:57 pm

  • Albuquerque police to buy property for seized vehicles

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Albuquerque police could get the funds to purchase a property for storing hundreds of vehicles seized during DWI arrests, a city official said.

  • In this Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, photo, Alabama Probate Judge Nick Williams laughs in a court room at the Washington County court house in Chatom, Ala. Williams, also a Baptist minister in Washington County, is among those who have stopped issuing any marriage licenses.   (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

    Alabama judges use segregation-era law to avoid gay marriage

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — As Alabama’s all-white Legislature tried to preserve racial segregation and worried about the possibility of mixed-race marriages in 1961, lawmakers rewrote state law to make it optional for counties to issue marriage licenses.

  • Friday, October 2, 2015

    The Latest: Father of teen who survived Oregon shooting recounts her harrowing experience

  • In this photo taken June 23, 2015, the Mississippi state flag is unfurled against the front of the Governor's Mansion in Jackson, Miss.  A new proposal seeks a statewide election on removing the Confederate battle emblem from the Mississippi flag. But it could be years before the issue gets on the ballot, and there's no guarantee voters would accept it.(AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

    Proposal would erase Confederate sign from Mississippi flag

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A new proposal seeks a statewide election on removing the Confederate battle emblem from the Mississippi flag. But it could be years before the issue gets on the ballot, and there’s no guarantee voters would accept it.

  • President Barack Obama gestures as he answers question during a news conference in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

    Obama: No more temporary spending bills, budget deal needed

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Friday he won’t sign another temporary government funding bill after the current one expires Dec. 11, insisting that congressional Republicans and Democrats work out a long-term budget deal with the White House.

  • Judge rules New Mexico tree-cutting law is unconstitutional

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A federal court has struck down a state law that gave New Mexico counties the authority to remove trees and clear overgrown areas on national forest land without having to get approval from the U.S. Forest Service.

  • Senate panel votes to lift 40-year-old US ban on oil exports

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Banking Committee endorsed a bill Thursday to lift the four-decade-old ban on crude oil exports, the latest sign of congressional support for legislation that President Barack Obama opposes.

  • Brazil’s lower house approves visa waiver tied to Olympics

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil’s lower house voted Thursday to give a 90-day waiver to foreigners who normally need a visa so they can come to the country next year for the Olympic and Paralympic Games. The bill is expected to be approved by the Senate and signed by President Dilma Rousseff.