• Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards, right,  talks with Jessica Venable, left, and Nicole Sylvester, center, during his tour of damaged neighborhoods Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016.  Edwards said afterward that like many other areas that flooded this month, people in Youngsville, La., were in areas that had never flooded and didn’t have to buy flood insurance. He says that insurance is designed to cover all damages, while help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency cannot do that. He says he will ask Congress for more money to help the recovery.  (Scott Clause/The Daily Advertiser via AP)

    Gov sees flooded subdivision, SW city saved by sandbag wall

    LAKE ARTHUR, La. (AP) — Gov. John Bel Edwards flew across south Louisiana Thursday, surveying flood damage from a helicopter and talking with people in a city that flooded and in one where a heroic effort by volunteers and others held floodwaters back.

  • Brazil's suspended President Dilma Rousseff smiles during a rally in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. Brazil’s Senate braces for a final showdown in a trial that could overthrow President Rousseff after months of lengthy proceedings in Congress. She is accused of breaking fiscal laws, in managing the federal budget as her government ran out of resources. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil Senate starts impeachment trial of President Rousseff

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil’s Senate on Thursday began deliberating whether to permanently remove President Dilma Rousseff from office, the final step in a leadership fight that has paralyzed Congress and cast a pall over a nation in the midst of a severe recession.

  • Correction: Congress-EpiPens-Manchin story

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — In a story Aug. 24 about U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin’s stance on price hikes for life-saving allergy injection pens, The Associated Press erroneously reported that the cost of a two-dose package of EpiPens rose more than 600 percent in the last nine years. The price rise reflects an increase of more than 500 percent.

  • Former pro wrestler running for state representative seat

    EAST HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — A former professional wrestler who once grappled with the likes of Hulk Hogan is now running for a state representative seat in Connecticut.

  • People celebrate in a park as they listen to the announcement from Havana, Cuba, that delegates of Colombia's government and leaders of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia reached a peace accord to end their half-century civil war, in Bogota, Colombia, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The government's accord with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia must still be ratified by voters in a plebiscite in order to take effect. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    Colombia’s president rushing plebiscite on deal with rebels

    BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Colombia’s president is moving quickly to hold a national referendum on a peace deal meant to end a half-century of bloody conflict with leftist rebels, delivering the final text of the deal to congress on Thursday and declaring a definitive cease-fire with the guerrillas.

    Updated: 8:35 pm

  • Correction: Water Park-Fatality-Regulation story

    TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — In a story Aug. 12 about the regulation in Kansas for amusement park rides, The Associated Press erroneously reported that South Dakota was among the states that have no laws regulating the industry. South Dakota passed a law requiring inspections in 2014.

  • People celebrate  the announcement from Havana, Cuba, that delegates of Colombia's government and leaders of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia reached a peace accord to end their half-century civil war, in Bogota, Colombia, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The government's accord with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia must still be ratified by voters in a plebiscite in order to take effect. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    Colombia, rebels say they have reached historic peace deal

    HAVANA (AP) — Colombia’s government and the country’s biggest rebel group reached a historic deal Wednesday evening for ending a half-century of hostilities in one of the world’s longest-running and bloodiest armed conflicts.

  • In this August 5, 2016 photo, Asma Dawaghreh poses for a photo at her apartment in Irbid, Jordan. Her family is one of dozens uprooted every year in the kingdom under the tribal practice of “jalwa” -- Arabic for “eviction” -- in which an entire clan can be forced to relocate because of a crime committed by a family member. The ancient tribal practice was meant to prevent blood feuds, but critics say it amounts to collective punishment and is no longer practical in modern life. Jordan's parliament is now trying to curb the tradition to reduce the harm to innocents, but some say faith in tribal rules may prove stronger. (AP Photo/Layla K. Quran)

    Forced relocations raise doubts over Jordan’s tribal customs

    IRBID, Jordan (AP) — It was four in the morning when Asma Dawaghreh fled her home with her sick husband and six children. With nothing but the loose change in her pockets, she packed her family into a car and left under the cover of darkness.

  • In this April 18, 2016 file photo, supporters of fair immigration reform dance in front of the Supreme Court in Washington. For more than a decade lawmakers have been pointing to their counterparts to take the blame for what just about everyone agrees is a broken immigration system.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

    Hunting for the root of immigration woes? Look to the past.

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For more than a decade, lawmakers have been pointing at their counterparts to take the blame for what just about everyone agrees is a broken immigration system.

  • New Mexico governor reiterates opposition to tax increase

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez will not consider any tax increases as the state seeks to close a projected budget shortfall during an upcoming special session of the Legislature, her spokesman reiterated Monday.