• In this photo taken Thursday, July 21, 2016, Anthony Villarreal ties his running shoe at his home in Citrus Heights, Calif. Villarreal had been a long distance runner for William Jessup University's country and track teams, before he was expelled in 2013, which, he says, was because the school found out he is gay. Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens introduced SB1146 which would expand state LGBT protections by removing the state's exemption for religious colleges and universities for anti-discrimination policies. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

    Bill would prevent LGBT discrimination at religious schools

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The conflict between religious freedom and gay rights has a new battleground — California’s religious colleges and universities.

    Updated: 12:43 pm

  • In this Feb. 23, 2016 file photo, protesters burn an American flag in Chicago. Champaign County Ill., State's Attorney Julia Rietz was alerted on July 4, 2016, that police had just arrested a resident on suspicion of burning an American flag. Rietz said she knew "immediately" that the Urbana Police Department needed to release him. The state law used to jail him, though clear in its prohibition of desecrating either the U.S. or state flags, is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

    States’ flag-burning laws unconstitutional, but persist

    URBANA, Ill. (AP) — Champaign County State’s Attorney Julia Rietz had just finished walking in a July 4th parade when her assistant told her a central Illinois man had been arrested on suspicion of burning an American flag.

    Updated: 12:20 pm

  • Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, right, holds a news conference near the site where Freddie Gray was arrested after her office dropped the remaining charges against three Baltimore police officers awaiting trial in Gray's death, in Baltimore, Wednesday, July 27, 2016. The decision by prosecutors comes after a judge had already acquitted three of the six officers charged in the case. At left is Gray's father, Richard Shipley. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)

    Baltimore’s far from done despite collapse of criminal case

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Many of this city’s deepest challenges remain unresolved after the collapse of the criminal case against six police officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray, the young black man whose broken neck in police custody caused so much upheaval. Here’s a look at the to-do lists of those involved.

  • New Mexico lawmaker eyes ‘right to die’ bill amid court loss

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico state lawmaker is pushing for a law to allow terminally ill patients to end their lives with help from doctors a month after advocates for the practice suffered a court defeat.

  • Swimming’s governing body rules 7 Russians ineligible for Olympics because of doping violations

    LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Swimming’s governing body rules 7 Russians ineligible for Olympics because of doping violations.

  • In this Feb. 13, 2014, file photo, a worker attaches a banner to a scaffolding in New Orleans in preparation of the NBA All-Star basketball game. The league took the 2017 game out of Charlotte on Thursday, July 21, 2016,  because of its objections to a North Carolina law that limits anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay and transgender people. As the NBA looks for a new home for the 2017 All-Star Game, cities are lining up with open arms to welcome LeBron James, Stephen Curry and the hundred million or so dollars they would bring to the local economy. New Orleans is the favorite, with one official familiar with the discussions telling The Associated Press that the league and city are “deep in negotiations” to stage the game there for a third time.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

    Blame game follows NBA’s removal of Charlotte All-Star game

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NBA All-Star Game’s exit from North Carolina because of a law limiting protections for LGBT people represents some of the worst publicity yet for Republican Gov. Pat McCrory’s re-election campaign, even as he dismisses the move as political correctness gone too far.