• Correction: Hospital Superbug Outbreak story

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — In a Feb. 20, 2015 story about an antibiotic-resistant “superbug” outbreak at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, The Associated Press mischaracterized a statement an expert made about proving the cause of an infection. Lawrence Muscarella, a health care and sterilization expert, said he was suggesting an argument hospitals might use when he said, “Proving causation is impossible.” Muscarella said an infection can be proven to come from a hospital instrument.

  • Sharper files notice of appeal in federal rape case

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — NFL star Darren Sharper filed a federal court notice Friday that he now plans to appeal his conviction and nearly two-decade sentence in a drug and sexual assault case — a case in which he pleaded guilty.

    Updated: 4:26 pm

  • Judge blocks transgender bathroom law for 3 plaintiffs

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A federal judge ruled Friday that two students and an employee must be allowed to use restrooms matching their gender identity at University of North Carolina campuses, and he said they have a strong chance of proving the state’s bathroom-access measure violates federal law.

    Updated: 6:21 pm

  • Miller Shealy, a professor at the Charleston School of Law, announces at the school in Charleston, S.C., on Friday, Aug. 26, 2016, that attorneys plan to bring a civil rights lawsuit stemming from the 1944 execution of George Stinney. Stinney, executed in Columbia, S.C., was one of the youngest defendants executed in American history and the youngest executed in the 20th century. An all-white jury took only 10 minutes to decide Stinney's fate in the summer of 1944. A South Carolina state judge vacated the conviction almost two years ago. Attorneys announced Friday they will be working with law school students to file a lawsuit on behalf of Stinney's family. (AP Photo/Bruce Smith)

    Lawyers plan civil suit in ’44 execution of black youth

    CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Attorneys are investigating the possibility of filing a civil-rights lawsuit in the case of a black teenager electrocuted more than 70 years ago for the killings of two young white girls in a segregated South Carolina mill town.

    Updated: 1:13 pm

  • Man convicted of lying to become citizen gets nearly 5 years

    ATLANTA (AP) — A man convicted of getting U.S. citizenship fraudulently after prosecutors said he failed to disclose he was a guard at a concentration camp during the Bosnian War has been sentenced to serve nearly five years in federal prison.

  • Judge Thokozile Masipa, reads her verdict during the state appeal hearing at the high court in Johannesburg, South Africa,Friday, Aug. 26, 2016. The State lost it's appeal after challenging a ruling by Judge Masipa against convicted murderer Oscar Pistorius who received six years for the murder of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe/POOL)

    SAfrican judge denies appeal for harsher Pistorius sentence

    JOHANNESBURG (AP) — A South African judge on Friday dismissed an appeal by prosecutors for a harsher sentence against Oscar Pistorius who was found guilty of murder for killing his girlfriend in 2013.

  • Man gets house arrest for trying to extort ex-football star

    AKRON, Ohio (AP) — A quadriplegic man who admitted to trying to extort money from former Ohio State star and NFL player Christopher “Beanie” Wells has been sentenced to a year of house arrest after a judge concluded that imprisoning the defendant would be too costly for taxpayers.

  • Judge won’t dismiss Pierre-Paul privacy lawsuit against ESPN

    MIAMI (AP) — A Miami federal judge has refused to dismiss a lawsuit filed by New York Giants lineman Jason Pierre-Paul against ESPN over disclosure of his medical records from a 2015 fireworks accident.

  • The Corrections Corporation of America headquarters are shown Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016, in Nashville, Tenn. Private prison operator CCA wants to seal from public view documents in a lawsuit that claims female visitors to a Tennessee prison were forced to undergo strip searches to prove they were menstruating. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

    Prison company fights to seal documents about strip searches

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Private prison operator Corrections Corporation of America is trying to seal from public view documents in a lawsuit that claim female visitors to a Tennessee prison were forced to undergo strip searches to prove they were menstruating.

  • Brazil's suspended President Dilma Rousseff smiles during a rally in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. Brazil’s Senate braces for a final showdown in a trial that could overthrow President Rousseff after months of lengthy proceedings in Congress. She is accused of breaking fiscal laws, in managing the federal budget as her government ran out of resources. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil Senate starts impeachment trial of President Rousseff

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil’s Senate on Thursday began deliberating whether to permanently remove President Dilma Rousseff from office, the final step in a leadership fight that has paralyzed Congress and cast a pall over a nation in the midst of a severe recession.