• Palestinian mourners carry the body of  Nihad Waked, 15, who was shot dead by Israeli troops with Fouad Waked, 15, during their funeral in the village of Aeraqh near the West Bank city of Jenin, Sunday, Feb. 14, 2016. The Israeli army said the two teenagers were throwing rocks at passing vehicles near the West Bank city of Jenin, and when Israeli forces arrived at the scene, one of the Palestinians opened fire at them, soldiers fired back and killed the two Palestinians. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)

    Group: 1,800 housing starts in West Bank settlements in 2015

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Three Palestinians were killed and another critically wounded while attempting to attack Israeli security forces in three separate incidents in the West Bank on Sunday, the Israeli military and police said.

    Updated: 9:34 am

  • A man walks by an electronic stock board of a securities firm showing Japan's Nikkei Index that fell 760 points or 4.84 percent to 14,952.61 in Tokyo, Friday, Feb. 12, 2016. Japan's main stock index dived Friday, leading other Asian markets lower, after a sell-off in banking shares roiled investors in the U.S. and Europe. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    The Latest: European markets enjoy modest bounce at the open

    LONDON (AP) — The latest on the turmoil in global financial markets (all times local):

  • People look at an electronic stock board of a securities firm in Tokyo, Friday, Feb. 12, 2016 . Japan's main stock index dived Friday, leading other Asian markets lower, after a sell-off in banking shares roiled investors in the U.S. and Europe. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    Japan stocks down 5.3 percent after Europe, US sell-off

    TOKYO (AP) — European stocks rose Friday, shrugging off a bad day in Asia, as the sell-off in banking shares abated and oil prices rebounded from a 12-year low. But Japan’s main stock index lost nearly 5 percent, leading other Asian markets lower.

  • Stock traders work at the New York Stock Exchange, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    What a recession does to your money

    NEW YORK (AP) — If we are indeed in the midst of a recession — and we won’t know we’re in one until well after it’s begun — stocks likely still have a long way to go down.

  • A man walk past a bank electronic board showing the Hong Kong share index at Hong Kong Stock Exchange Thursday, Feb. 11, 2015. Hong Kong's stocks are set for their biggest daily drop in six months on Thursday, as worries about the health of the global economy, particularly the mainland, sparked a sell-off in financials and energy shares, according to government radio. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

    Questions grow over banks as profit warnings pile up

    PARIS (AP) — Questions are growing over the financial health of banks, particularly in Europe, as they face a toxic mix of low economic growth, bad loans and squeezed earnings.

  • An employee passes next to an index board at the reception hall of the Stock Exchange in Athens, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Banks, particularly in Europe, have come under pressure over recent days as investors fret about their ability to cope with a bigger than expected global slowdown at a time when many still have sizeable bad loans on their books. Greece is expected to slip back into a mild recession in 2016, while the global sell-off in financial markets saw the value of shares on the Athens Stock Exchange sink to their worst level since 1989. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

    The Latest: European stocks sink, tracking Asia lower

    LONDON (AP) — The latest on the turmoil afflicting global financial markets (all times local):

  • Currency traders look at the computer monitors near the screens showing the foreign exchange rates at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Hong Kong, Seoul stocks sharply lower after holidays

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by a sharp drop in Hong Kong as it caught up with global market turmoil after Lunar New Year holidays. An escalation in tensions between North and South Korea added to a litany of woes for markets that were already flustered by signs of slowing global growth and the slide in oil prices.

  • Currency traders look at the computer monitors near the screens showing the foreign exchange rates at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Hong Kong, Seoul stocks sharply lower after holidays

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.

  • A man looks at an electronic stock board showing Japan's Nikkei 225 in Tokyo, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016. Asian stock markets fell for a third consecutive day Wednesday, beset by nerves about shaky global growth, falling oil prices and possible capital shortfalls at major European banks. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    Global stocks turn higher ahead of Yellen testimony

    LONDON (AP) — European stocks rose Wednesday and Wall Street was expected to open higher ahead of testimony from the Federal Reserve chief that could either ease market turmoil or add to it. Asian markets mostly fell in a spillover sell-off from the previous day’s losses.

  • This combination of file photos shows logos for IBM, Macy's, Chevron and Starwood Hotels and Resorts group's W Hotel Hollywood. Big companies have lost billions buying their own shares. Nearly half the companies in the Standard and Poor’s 500 index paid more for their shares in the past three years than they are worth, according to analysis by The Associated Press. Retailer Macy’s is down $1.4 billion on its purchases, a 24 percent loss. As the price of oil plunged, driller Chevron lost $3.3 billion betting on its stock, a 33 percent loss. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide has lost hundreds of millions on buybacks, more than a fifth of what it spent. IBM has the biggest losses from buybacks, down $5.5 billion. (AP Photo)

    Companies lose billions buying back their own stock

    NEW YORK (AP) — If you think your stocks are doing poorly, check out the performance of some of the most sophisticated investors, the ones with more knowledge about what’s going on inside businesses than anyone else: Companies that buy their own shares.