• This combination of file photos shows logos for IBM, Macy's, Chevron and Starwood Hotels and Resorts group's W Hotel Hollywood. Big companies have lost billions buying their own shares. Nearly half the companies in the Standard and Poor’s 500 index paid more for their shares in the past three years than they are worth, according to analysis by The Associated Press. Retailer Macy’s is down $1.4 billion on its purchases, a 24 percent loss. As the price of oil plunged, driller Chevron lost $3.3 billion betting on its stock, a 33 percent loss. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide has lost hundreds of millions on buybacks, more than a fifth of what it spent. IBM has the biggest losses from buybacks, down $5.5 billion. (AP Photo)

    Companies lose billions buying back their own stock

    NEW YORK (AP) — If you think your stocks are doing poorly, check out the performance of some of the most sophisticated investors, the ones with more knowledge about what’s going on inside businesses than anyone else: Companies that buy their own shares.

  • A man looks at screens displaying financial information at the Stock Exchange in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Renewed jitters about the global economy set off a wave of selling in banking stocks after Asian markets tumbled Tuesday, led by a 5.4 percent slide in Tokyo. The stock index in Spain was off roughly 4 percent, while Italy's lost about 5 percent and Greece's index sank about 8 percent. Stock markets have been slump so far this year after a lackluster 2015. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

    The Latest: Relief as European markets eke out gains

    LONDON (AP) — The latest on the turmoil afflicting global financial markets (all times local):

    Updated: 10:59 am

  • American flags fly at the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street,  July 6, 2015.  World stock markets were uneven Friday, Feb. 5, 2016, as investors awaited U.S. job numbers that could influence how much the Fed raises interest rates this year. Japanese shares sagged on the strengthening yen. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    Global stocks mostly fall amid economy jitters

    LONDON (AP) — Worries over the global economy weighed heavily on stock markets Monday, with Europe bearing the brunt of the selling. And oil prices fell further, with the benchmark New York rate below $30 a barrel again.

  • American flags fly at the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street,  July 6, 2015.  World stock markets were uneven Friday, Feb. 5, 2016, as investors awaited U.S. job numbers that could influence how much the Fed raises interest rates this year. Japanese shares sagged on the strengthening yen. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    Stocks edge lower in early trading following jobs report

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks posted steep losses Friday, ending the week with broad declines, as investors fretted over a report showing that U.S. job creation slowed last month.

  • American flags fly at the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street,  July 6, 2015.  World stock markets were uneven Friday, Feb. 5, 2016, as investors awaited U.S. job numbers that could influence how much the Fed raises interest rates this year. Japanese shares sagged on the strengthening yen. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    Asian stocks directionless ahead of US jobless report

    NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market opened slightly lower after the government reported only modest job growth last month.

  • A woman waits to cross a street in front of an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Most Asian stocks jumped Thursday as oil prices bounced back and weak U.S. economic data fueled investor hopes that the Fed would slow the pace of rate hikes this year. Japanese shares fell as the yen rose against the dollar. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

    Most Asian stocks jump as oil rallies on weaker dollar

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks opened slightly lower as retail companies slipped.

  • In this Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a Wall Street street sign is framed by a giant American flag hanging on the facade of the New York Stock Exchange. Global stock markets were having another lackluster day Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016, amid ongoing worries over the state of the world economy, which has piled the pressure on oil prices in particular. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

    US stocks give up an early gain and move lower; Yahoo down

    HONG KONG (AP) — Most Asian stocks jumped Thursday as oil prices bounced back and weak U.S. economic data fueled investor hopes that the Fed would slow the pace of rate hikes this year. Japanese shares fell as the yen rose against the dollar.

  • In this Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a Wall Street street sign is framed by a giant American flag hanging on the facade of the New York Stock Exchange. Global stock markets were having another lackluster day Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016, amid ongoing worries over the state of the world economy, which has piled the pressure on oil prices in particular. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

    Asian stocks weighed down by another oil price dive

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are gaining ground in early trading as investors were encouraged by some strong company earnings reports and a pickup in the price of crude oil.

  • This July 15, 2013, file photo, shows a sign for Wall Street outside the New York Stock Exchange. Falling oil prices continued to weigh on global stock markets Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2016, a day after a 6-percent plunge that was sparked by concerns over the global economic recovery following weak Chinese and U.S. data. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    Energy sector leads another decline in stocks as oil falls

    TOKYO (AP) — Asian shares stumbled Wednesday as another steep drop in the price of oil reinforced worries about the potential impact on the world economy of job cuts and reduced investment in the energy industry.

  • Miss Piggy overlooks the New York Stock Exchange trading floor after ringing the opening bell to highlight the season premier of Disney's "The Muppets" television show, Monday, Feb. 1, 2016. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    Global stock markets mostly lower as oil extends fall

    LONDON (AP) — Falling oil prices continued to weigh on global stock markets Tuesday, a day after a 6-percent plunge that was sparked by concerns over the global economic recovery following weak Chinese and U.S. data.