• Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, center, strolls with Stanley Fischer, right, vice chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, and Bill Dudley, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, before her speech to the annual invitation-only conference of central bankers from around the world, at Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park, north of Jackson Hole, Wyo., Friday, Aug 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Yellen suggests rate hike is coming but offers no timetable

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the case for raising interest rates has strengthened in light of a solid job market and an improved outlook for the U.S. economy and inflation. But she stopped short of offering any timetable.

  • Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa, Fla., Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. (Loren Elliott/The Tampa Bay Times via AP)

    WHY IT MATTERS: Trade

    WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: In this angry election year, many American voters are deeply skeptical about free trade — or downright hostile to it.

  • In this Thursday, July 21, 2016, file photo, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi speaks during a news conference in Frankfurt, Germany, after a meeting of the governing council. The Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan have pumped trillions of dollars into global financial markets and taken the radical step of pushing interest rates below zero in Europe and Japan. But the results have been lackluster. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)

    Bold moves, tepid gains: Have central banks met their limit?

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The world’s key central banks have worked themselves into contortions to try to rev up economic growth, raise inflation and coax consumers and businesses to borrow and spend more.