• In this Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016, file photo, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte gestures with a fist bump during his visit to the Philippine Army's Camp Mateo Capinpin at Tanay township, Rizal province east of Manila, Philippines. Since Duterte unleashed a massive anti-drug crackdown after taking office barely two months ago, nearly 2,000 suspected drug pushers and users have been killed. He has called the pope a son of a bitch, the U.S. ambassador gay, the United Nations inutile, and threatened to declare martial law if the Supreme Court meddles in his work. But, according to a survey early last month, he has the support of nearly 91 percent of Filipinos. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)

    Filipinos seen backing Duterte despite rising drug killings

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — On the day he was sworn into office, President Rodrigo Duterte went to a Manila slum and exhorted residents who knew any drug addicts to “go ahead and kill them yourself as getting their parents to do it would be too painful.”

  • In this Feb. 12, 2015 file photo, the Port of Los Angeles, with some cargo loading cranes in the upright and idle position, are seen in this view from the San Pedro area of Los Angeles. In this angry election year, many American voters are skeptical about free trade, or hostile to it. The backlash threatens a pillar of U.S. policy: The United States has long sought global trade. Economists say imports cut prices for consumers and make the U.S. more efficient. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

    WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A selection of issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans, in brief:

  • FILE- In this April 20, 2015, file photo, a sidewalk leads to the South Building on campus at The University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C. A federal judge ruled Friday, Aug. 26, 2016, that two students and an employee must be allowed to use restrooms matching their gender identity at University of North Carolina campuses, and he said they have a strong chance of proving the state's bathroom-access measure violates federal law, a judicial rebuke that transgender rights advocates hailed as a victory. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

    Judge blocks transgender bathroom law for 3 plaintiffs

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A federal judge ruled Friday that two students and an employee must be allowed to use restrooms matching their gender identity at University of North Carolina campuses, and he said they have a strong chance of proving the state’s bathroom-access measure violates federal law, a judicial rebuke that transgender rights advocates hailed as a victory.

    Updated: 11:08 pm

  • Defense attorneys clash with prison over recorded meetings

    KANSAS CITY, Kan. (AP) — Defense attorneys who represent inmates at a privately run federal prison in Kansas were livid after learning that their meetings with clients had been recorded on video, despite repeated assurances from the penitentiary that the conversations were private.

  • Judge won’t dismiss Pierre-Paul privacy lawsuit against ESPN

    MIAMI (AP) — A Miami federal judge has refused to dismiss a lawsuit filed by New York Giants lineman Jason Pierre-Paul against ESPN over disclosure of his medical records from a 2015 fireworks accident.

  • Florida shock jock’s lawyers permanently disbarred

    TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — The Florida Supreme Court has permanently disbarred two lawyers accused of orchestrating the arrest of a rival attorney.

  • Brazil's suspended President Dilma Rousseff smiles during a rally in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. Brazil’s Senate braces for a final showdown in a trial that could overthrow President Rousseff after months of lengthy proceedings in Congress. She is accused of breaking fiscal laws, in managing the federal budget as her government ran out of resources. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil Senate starts impeachment trial of President Rousseff

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil’s Senate on Thursday began deliberating whether to permanently remove President Dilma Rousseff from office, the final step in a leadership fight that has paralyzed Congress and cast a pall over a nation in the midst of a severe recession.

  • Postscript: After US sentence, Sharper goes to state court

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Making clear that she thought the sentence was a light one, a Louisiana judge Thursday formally imposed a 20-year prison sentence on former NFL star Darren Sharper, who last week was sentenced by a federal judge to 18 years and four months in a drug and rape case with victims in four states.

  • This undated photo provided by William Herron, shows Rosalind Alexander-Kasparik, left, and her fiance, David Rector, who is seeking to have his voting rights restored five years after a judge ruled that a traumatic brain injury disqualified him from casting a ballot in San Diego. As the November election neared, it looked like Rector would once again be unable to vote. Then the 66-year-old former National Public Radio producer learned about a California law that took effect Jan. 1, that makes it easier for people with developmental disabilities to keep and regain the right to vote, if they can express a desire to vote. On Tuesday, Aug. 23, Rector will seek to have his voting rights restored and advocates representing him and others who have been disqualified will file a complaint with the U.S. Justice Department asking that the state be required to notify them of the new law in time for the Nov. 8 ballot. (William Herron via AP)

    Disabled California man seeks to have voting rights restored

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — A former producer at NPR who lost his ability to walk and speak asked a judge Tuesday to restore his right to vote under a new California law that makes it easier for people with disabilities to keep that right and regain it if lost.

  • This undated photo provided by Bartlow Gallery, Ltd. shows a painting of a landscape that was once valued at more than $10 million. A federal judge in Chicago is set to issue a verdict in a peculiar civil trial over a celebrated Scottish-born artist's insistence that he did not paint the landscape work. The painting's owner maintains that the painting of the desert landscape, which he paid $100 for in the ’70s, is by Scottish-born Peter Doig. (Bartlow Gallery, Ltd. via AP)

    Was painting by famed living artist? US judge to decide

    CHICAGO (AP) — A federal judge in Chicago is set to issue a verdict in a peculiar civil trial over a celebrated Scottish-born artist’s insistence that he did not paint a landscape work that was once valued at more than $10 million.