• In this Tuesday, August 23, 2016, photo, Ahmad Abughaush displays his taekwondo gold medal from the 2016 Olympics for photographers on his arrival to the Queen Alia International Airport in Amman, Jordan. Abughaush, Jordan's first Olympic champion, has returned home to a royal welcome. The 20-year-old was greeted by three princes and a cheering crowd at the kingdom's main airport, after his return from the Rio games. Abughaush says he'll seek to defend his title at the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    Jordan’s first Olympic medalist comes home to royal welcome

    AMMAN, Jordan (AP) — Jordan’s first Olympic champion, taekwondo gold medal winner Ahmad Abughaush, has returned home to a royal welcome.

  • In this August 5, 2016 photo, Asma Dawaghreh poses for a photo at her apartment in Irbid, Jordan. Her family is one of dozens uprooted every year in the kingdom under the tribal practice of “jalwa” -- Arabic for “eviction” -- in which an entire clan can be forced to relocate because of a crime committed by a family member. The ancient tribal practice was meant to prevent blood feuds, but critics say it amounts to collective punishment and is no longer practical in modern life. Jordan's parliament is now trying to curb the tradition to reduce the harm to innocents, but some say faith in tribal rules may prove stronger. (AP Photo/Layla K. Quran)

    Forced relocations raise doubts over Jordan’s tribal customs

    IRBID, Jordan (AP) — It was four in the morning when Asma Dawaghreh fled her home with her sick husband and six children. With nothing but the loose change in her pockets, she packed her family into a car and left under the cover of darkness.

  • In this Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016 photo, a selection of private medical files published by transparency website WikiLeaks is shown in Paris. WikiLeaks’ global crusade to expose government secrets is causing collateral damage to the privacy of hundreds of innocent people, including survivors of sexual abuse, sick children and the mentally ill, The Associated Press has found.(AP Photo/Raphael Satter)

    Private lives are exposed as WikiLeaks spills its secrets

    CAIRO (AP) — Its scoops have rattled the Saudi foreign ministry, the National Security Agency and the U.S. Democratic Party. But WikiLeaks’ spectacular mass-disclosures have also hit hundreds of average people — including sick children, rape victims and mental patients — who just happened to find their personal information included in the group’s giant data dumps, The Associated Press has found.