• In this March 31, 2016, file photo, South Korean President Park Geun-hye, left, shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as U.S. President Barack Obama watches after their meeting at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington. By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Obama’s Hiroshima trip parachutes him into history disputes

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing.

  • Vietnam veterans Robert Turner, 68, left, and Cliff Stone, 68, both of North Andover, Mass, both of whom said that they oppose President Barack Obama's decision to lift the half-century-old Vietnam arms embargo, pose for a photo at the VFW hall Monday, May 23, 2016, in North Andover, Mass. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Many Vietnam vets say they support lifting of arms embargo

    CHICAGO (AP) — The way Terry Neilen sees it, lifting the ban on U.S. arms sales to Vietnam makes sense in the face of China’s growing influence in the region.

  • President Barack Obama winks as he arrives for a news conference with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang, Monday, May 23, 2016, at the International Convention Center in Hanoi, Vietnam. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama lifts decades-old arms ban in his 1st visit to Vietnam

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Eager to banish lingering shadows of the Vietnam War, President Barack Obama lifted the U.S. embargo on selling arms to America’s former enemy Monday and made the case for a more trusting and prosperous relationship going forward. Activists said the president was being too quick to gloss over serious human rights abuses in his push to establish warmer ties.

  • People walk by an electronic stock board of a securities firm in Tokyo, Monday, May 23, 2016. Japanese stocks fell and other Asian markets were higher Monday after a global finance meeting failed to produce an economic growth plan and Tokyo reported weaker exports. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    Asian stocks rise after G7 meet; Tokyo falls on weak trade

    LONDON (AP) — Stock markets were choppy Monday after a meeting of the developed world’s central bankers and finance ministers failed to yield fresh ideas for spurring economic growth.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama arrives on Air Force One at Noi Bai International Airport in Hanoi, Vietnam, Sunday, May 22, 2016. The president is on a weeklong trip to Asia as part of his effort to pay more attention to the region and boost economic and security cooperation. (Hoang Dinh Nam/ Pool Photo via AP)

    Obama looks to boost economic, security ties in Asia

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — President Barack Obama’s mission in Vietnam and Japan is to build stronger economic and security ties with Asian-Pacific allies anxious about the rise of an increasingly muscular China. That forward-looking message will be delivered even as he confronts the legacies of two wars long past — Vietnam and World War II — that still are fraught with emotion.

  • Anne Buijs of the Netherlands spikes the ball against Peru during their Women's Volleyball World Olympic qualification tournament in Tokyo, Saturday, May 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    Dutch women beat Peru to qualify for Rio volleyball

    TOKYO (AP) — The Netherlands beat Peru 25-16, 25-14, 25-17 Saturday to qualify for the women’s volleyball tournament at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics.

  • Obama leaves for Asia to boost trade, cooperation

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama departed Saturday on a weeklong, 16,000-mile trip to Asia, part of his effort to pay more attention to the region and boost economic and security cooperation.

  • Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso, left, speaks next to Bank of Japan Gov. Haruhiko Kuroda, right, during a press conference after a meeting of finance ministers and heads of central banks of the Group of Seven in in Akiu, northern Japan, Saturday, May 21, 2016. The G7 major economies showed a united front on fighting terrorist financing and tax evasion in talks that ended Saturday, but shied away from coordinated action on policies to revive stalling growth. Yohei Kanezashi/Kyodo News via AP) JAPAN OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT

    G-7 commits to step up controls on terrorist financing

    AKIU, Japan (AP) — The Group of Seven major economies showed a united front on fighting terrorist financing and tax evasion in talks that ended Saturday, but shied away from coordinated action on policies to revive stalling growth.

  • Kentucky Derby winner Nyquist is washed at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, Friday, May 20, 2016. The Preakness Stakes horse race is scheduled to take place May 21. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

    Derby winner Nyquist ready for Preakness, even a rainy one

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Let it rain again on the Preakness. Team Nyquist doesn’t seem concerned.

  • U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew talks to reporters during a press briefing in Sendai, northern Japan, Friday, May 20, 2016. Top finance officials of the Group of Seven industrialized economies kicked off their two-day meeting over discussions on revitalizing the global economy on Friday. (AP Photo/Elaine Kurtenbach)

    G-7 finance leaders seek to reassure on global economy

    AKIU, Japan (AP) — Having agreed to only tacit coordination of their varying strategies for boosting growth, financial leaders of the Group of Seven major economies turned Saturday to housekeeping issues such as terrorist financing, tax evasion and support for fighting pandemics.