• U.S. President Barack Obam, right, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands after laying wreaths at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western, Japan, Friday, May 27, 2016. Obama on Friday became the first sitting U.S. president to visit the site of the world's first atomic bomb attack, bringing global attention both to survivors and to his unfulfilled vision of a world without nuclear weapons. Atomic Bomb Dome is seen in the background. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    The Latest: Hiroshima peace park preparing for Obama

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — The Latest on U.S. President Barack Obama’s visit to Hiroshima, Japan (all times local):

  • People gather around the gutted Atomic Bomb Dome at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, southwestern Japan, Thursday, May 26, 2016. President Barack Obama is to visit Hiroshima on Friday, May 27. Seven years ago, a new American president stood before cheering throngs in Prague’s historic Hradcany Square and laid out an audacious goal. “Today, I state clearly and with conviction America's commitment to seek the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons,” Barack Obama declared. “I'm not naive. This goal will not be reached quickly _ perhaps not in my lifetime. It will take patience and persistence. But now we, too, must ignore the voices who tell us that the world cannot change. We have to insist, ‘Yes, we can.’”  (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

    Obama ready to face historic, haunted ground of Hiroshima

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Convinced that the time for this moment is right at last, President Barack Obama on Friday will become the first American president to confront the historic and haunted ground of Hiroshima.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrive to the Ise Grand Shrine in Ise, Japan during the G-7 Summit on Thursday, May 26, 2016. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    Obama defends his nuclear record on eve of Hiroshima visit

    SHIMA, Japan (AP) — On the eve of his historic trip to Hiroshima, President Barack Obama is defending the vigor of his efforts to rid the world of nuclear weapons. He says he will use his visit to the Japanese memorial site on Friday to underscore “the sense of urgency that we all should have.”

  • With the Atomic Bomb Dome as a backdrop, passers-by move past riot police near Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima, southwestern Japan, Thursday, May 26, 2016. U.S. President Barack Obama is to visit Hiroshima on Friday, May 27 after the Group of Seven summit in central Japan, becoming the first serving American president to do so. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

    Obama’s every gesture will be scrutinized in Hiroshima visit

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Every gesture. Every word uttered or avoided. Every person Barack Obama speaks with, listens to and stands beside in Hiroshima. All of it will help determine the success of a trip with huge potential political and diplomatic pitfalls, both in America and Asia.

  • President Barack Obama speaks during a news conference at the Shima Kanko Hotel in Shima, Japan, Thursday, May 26, 2016, after completion the third working session of the G-7 Summit. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama: World leaders rightfully ‘rattled’ by Trump

    SHIMA, Japan (AP) — President Barack Obama said Thursday that foreign leaders are “rattled” by Donald Trump and have good reason to feel that way, as he accused the presumptive Republican presidential nominee of ignorance about world affairs.

  • International Olympic Committee (IOC) Vice President and IOC Coordination Commission for Tokyo 2020 Chairman John Coates speaks during a press Briefing of the IOC Executive meeting for the Olympic Games Tokyo, in Tokyo, Thursday, May 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    IOC expresses concern over investigation into Tokyo 2020 bid

    TOKYO (AP) — IOC vice president John Coates expressed concern Thursday over payments made to a Singapore firm which have entangled Tokyo’s winning bid for the 2020 Olympics in a bribery investigation.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama, left, talks with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on the Ujibashi bridge as they visit the Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Mie prefecture, Japan Thursday, May 26, 2016 , ahead of the first session of the G-7 summit meetings. When Obama and Abe make a historic visit to Hiroshima - the first time a sitting U.S. president has visited the site of the first atomic bomb attack - their words advocating nuclear disarmament will clash with real-world security necessities. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP)

    Nuclear-free aspirations of Obama, Abe conflict with reality

    TOBA, Japan (AP) — There is the soaring rhetoric. And then there’s the messy reality.

  • In this May 3, 2016 file photo, World War II veteran Lester Tenney, 95, holds a bamboo stick that he said Japanese soldiers used to beat him while he was held as a prisoner of war, at his home in Carlsbad, Calif. The former Army staff sergeant believes President Barack Obama should keep ex-POWs like him and others in mind when he makes his historic visit to Hiroshima on Friday, May 27. (AP Photo/Julie Watson, File)

    VOICES: Hiroshima serves as memorial for all victims of WWII

    CARLSBAD, Calif. (AP) — The suffering he endured during World War II still haunts 95-year-old Lester Tenney, who has black lung disease from working as a prisoner of war in a Japanese coal mine.

  • Leaders from left, Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Chad President Idriss Deby Itno,  Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and French President Francois Hollande, leave a space for U.S. President Barack Obama, as they wait for him to arrive for a photo session with other G-7 leaders and Outreach Partners in Shima, Japan, Friday, May 27, 2016, during the G-7 Summit. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, Pool)

    The Latest: G-7 leaders arrive at Japan’s sacred Ise shrine

    ISE, Japan (AP) — The latest news on the Group of Seven summit in Japan, where the leaders of the seven advanced economies are meeting for two days (all times local):

  • Leaders of Group of Seven nations, from left, British Prime Minister David Cameron, French President Francois Hollande, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, European Council President Donald Tusk, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, U.S. President Barack Obama and German Chancellor Angela Merkel look to media as they gather to participate in a G-7 Working Session in Shima, Japan, Friday, May 27, 2016, during the G-7 Summit. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, Pool)

    G-7 in sync with Japanese Prime Minister Abe’s own agenda

    SHIMA, Japan (AP) — The leaders of the Group of Seven rich economies pledged Friday to “collectively tackle” major risks to global growth, including direct political threats to the international order from terrorist attacks, violent extremism and refugee flows.