• Israel’s Laetitia Beck takes LPGA Tour lead in Alabama

    PRATTVILLE, Ala. (AP) — Laetitia Beck took the first-round lead in the Yokohama Tire LPGA Classic, dodging some of the wind Thursday morning in a bogey-free 7-under 65.

  • In this October 1980 photo provided by the Korea News Service (KNS), then North Korean leader Kim Il Sung, center, and his son Kim Jong Il, left, talk about the preparation for the convention of North Korea's Workers' Party in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea, the world’s last great master of socialist spectacle, is likely to deliver a big one when its ruling party holds its first congress in 36 years later this week, scheduled to begin on Friday, May 6, 2016. (Korea News Service via AP) JAPAN OUT UNTIL 14 DAYS AFTER THE DAY OF TRANSMISSION

    Details of N. Korea party congress secret, but goals clear

    TOKYO (AP) — North Korea, the world’s last great master of Cold War-era spectacle, is likely to deliver a big one when its ruling party holds its first congress in 36 years later this week.

  • Pilot Andre Borschberg sits in the cockpit of the Solar Impulse 2, as his son, Teo Borschberg, prepares the solar powered plane at Moffett Field in Mountain View, Calif., before dawn Monday, May 2, 2016. The plane took off from California for Arizona to resume its journey around the world using only energy from the sun. The Swiss-made Solar Impulse 2 left Mountain View south of San Francisco shortly after 5 a.m. Monday for an expected 16-hour trip to Phoenix.  (Karl Mondon/The Mercury News-Bay Area News Group via AP)

    Solar plane on global trip arrives in Arizona

    GOODYEAR, Ariz. (AP) — A solar-powered airplane landed in suburban Phoenix Monday night after a daylong flight from California — the latest leg in its around the world journey using only energy from the sun.

  • In this Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015 file photo,  North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves at a parade in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea is preparing to hold a once-in-a-generation congress of its ruling party that is intended to rally the nation behind leader Kim Jong Un and could provide an important glimpse into Kim’s plans for the country’s economy and military. The congress is set to begin May 6, 2016. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

    North Korea party congress to show unity around Kim Jong Un

    TOKYO (AP) — North Korea is preparing to hold a once-in-a-generation congress of its ruling party that is intended to rally the nation behind leader Kim Jong Un and could provide an important glimpse into Kim’s plans for the country’s economy and military.

  • Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida, left, shakes hands with China's Premier Li Keqiang during a meeting at the Zhongnanhai leadership compound in Beijing Saturday, April 30, 2016. (Jason Lee/Pool Photo via AP)

    China, Japan foreign ministers meet to smooth tense ties

    BEIJING (AP) — China laid out firm conditions Saturday for improved ties with Japan, telling Tokyo’s visiting foreign minister that there could be “no ambiguity or vacillation” in meeting Beijing’s demands over historical interpretation, relations with Taiwan and other key matters.

  • A currency trader walks by the screen showing the Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI) at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, April 29, 2016. Asian stocks were mixed Friday after Wall Street slid and Japan's central bank surprised markets by putting off possible additional stimulus. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Asian stocks mixed after Wall Street slide

    BEIJING (AP) — Global stock markets mostly fell Friday after Wall Street slid and Japan’s central bank surprised markets by putting off possible additional stimulus.

  • Trader Tommy Kalikas, center, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Thursday, April 28, 2016. Stocks are opening broadly lower on Wall Street as traders look over the latest batch of earnings and deal news. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    Despite wave of deals, stocks slip as economic growth slows

    BEIJING (AP) — Asian stocks were mixed Friday after Wall Street slid and Japan’s central bank surprised markets by putting off possible additional stimulus.

  • In this Feb. 10, 2016, file photo, members of a media tour group wearing a protective suit and a mask walk together after they receive a briefing from Tokyo Electric Power Co. employees (in blue) in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. In an AP interview, a chief architect of an “ice wall” being built into the ground around the broken Fukushima nuclear plant defends the project but acknowledges it won’t be watertight, and as much as 50 tons of radiated water will still accumulate each day. TEPCO, the utility that operates the facility, resorted to the $312 million frozen barrier after it became clear that something had to be done to stem the flow of water into and out of the broken reactors so that they can be dismantled. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP, File)

    AP Interview: Fukushima plant’s new ice wall not watertight

    TOKYO (AP) — Coping with the vast amounts of ground water flowing into the broken Fukushima nuclear plant — which then becomes radiated and seeps back out — has become such a problem that Japan is building a 35 billion yen ($312 million) “ice wall” into the earth around it.