• People attend Friday prayers in Fatih mosque, Istanbul, Friday July 22, 2016. Turkish lawmakers responded to an attempted coup by approving a three-month state of emergency that allows the government to extend detention times and issue decrees. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    Turkish city streets are calm after emergency declaration

    ISTANBUL (AP) — A top Turkish official on Friday accused the United States of “standing up for savages” by not immediately handing over a U.S.-based Muslim cleric who the government claims orchestrated last week’s failed coup. Speaking in Washington, President Barack Obama said there was a legal process for extradition and encouraged Turkey to present evidence.

  • People walk in Kizilay Square with a poster of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in the background in Ankara, Turkey, Thursday, July 21, 2016. Turkish lawmakers declared a three-month state of emergency Thursday, overwhelmingly approving President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's request for sweeping new powers to expand a crackdown in the aftermath of last week's coup. Parliament voted 346-115 to approve the national state of emergency, which will give Erdogan the authority to extend detention times for suspects and issue decrees that have the force of law without parliamentary approval, among other powers.(AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

    Analysis: Is Turkish leader transforming a nation?

    ISTANBUL (AP) — The stunning sweep of Turkey’s crackdown following an attempted coup last week forces questions about how far President Recep Tayyip Erdogan will go in a tense, conspiracy-fueled country. While the purges may be designed to derail any future insurrections, there are increasing concerns that Erdogan is seizing the moment to transform Turkey, steering it from its secular roots toward a more pious Muslim model and cementing personal power at the expense of democratic ideals.

  • Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan hold banners and waves their national flags, during a rally at Kizilay main square, in Ankara, Turkey, Wednesday, July 20, 2016.  U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is calling on Turkey to provide hard evidence that a U.S.-based cleric was behind a foiled coup attempt last weekend if it wants him extradited.  (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

    Experts: Restoring death penalty in Turkey would be risky

    ISTANBUL (AP) — Rights groups and legal experts said Wednesday that Turkey would be abandoning international rights conventions, and reverting to relics of military dictatorships if it reinstates the death penalty, which was abolished more than a decade ago.

  • A woman takes part in a pro-government rally in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The rebellion, which saw warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, was quashed by loyal government forces and masses of civilians who took to the streets. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    The Latest: Canada urges respect for law in coup aftermath

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the situation in Turkey after the failed military coup last week (all times local):

  • People wave Turkish flags as they gather in Taksim Square in Istanbul, protesting against the attempted coup, Wednesday, July 20, 2016.  Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared a 3-month state of emergency after a failed coup. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    Turkey widens crackdown after botched coup

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey’s president on Wednesday declared a three-month state of emergency following a botched coup attempt, declaring he would rid the military of the “virus” of subversion and giving the government sweeping powers to expand a crackdown that has already included mass arrests and the closure of hundreds of schools.

  • Pro-government wave Turkish flags as they protest against the attempted coup, in Istanbul, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. T (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

    Turkey’s Erdogan recounts night of coup, mulls death penalty

    ISTANBUL (AP) — Asserting that “all the evidence” points to a U.S.-based Muslim cleric as the mastermind of last week’s failed coup, Turkey’s government on Tuesday fired tens of thousands of teachers, university deans and others accused of ties to the plot and demanded the cleric’s extradition.

  • A protester salutes as he takes part in a rally in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Sunday, July 17, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, with the justice minister saying Sunday that 6,000 people had been detained in the investigation, including three of the country's top generals and hundreds of soldiers. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    Crackdown following failed coup in Turkey raises concerns

    ISTANBUL (AP) — Following a failed coup against Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the government moved swiftly Sunday to shore up his power and remove those perceived as an enemy, saying it has detained 6,000 people.

  • Turkish soldiers march after a mass funeral for the victims of a failed military coup last Friday, outside Kocatepe Mosque in Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, July 17, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, with the justice minister saying Sunday that 6,000 people had been detained in the investigation, including three of the country's top generals and hundreds of soldiers. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

    The Latest: Turkey cracks down on alleged coup plotters

    ISTANBUL (AP) — The Latest on Turkey’s failed military coup. (all times local):

  • People gather at a pro-government rally in central Istanbul's Taksim square, Saturday, July 16, 2016. Forces loyal to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan quashed a coup attempt in a night of explosions, air battles and gunfire that left some hundreds of people dead and scores of others wounded Saturday. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)

    Turkey rounds up 52 military, seeks to detain 53 judges

    ISTANBUL (AP) — Chanting, dancing and waving flags, tens of thousands of Turks marched through the streets into the wee hours Sunday in half a dozen cities to defend democracy and support the country’s long-time leader after a failed military coup shocked the nation.

  • People chant slogans as they gather at a pro-government rally in central Istanbul's Taksim square, Saturday, July 16, 2016. Forces loyal to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan quashed a coup attempt in a night of explosions, air battles and gunfire that left some hundreds of people dead and scores of others wounded Saturday. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)

    Turkish president says he’s in control, coup faltering

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Rather than toppling Turkey’s strongman president, a failed military coup that left more than 250 dead appears to have bolstered Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s immediate grip on power and boosted his popularity.