• FILE: In this Aug. 2014 file photo, worshippers gather at the Nizamiye Mosque for prayers after celebrating Eid in Midrand, north of Johannesburg, South Africa. Turkey has launched an international campaign to shut schools and foundations linked to Fethullah Gulen, the Muslim preacher that it blames for an attempted coup last month. Some Erdogan supporters also criticized the Nizamiye mosque north of Johannesburg, a soaring structure built with the funds of a Gulen backer. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell, file)

    Turkey targets Gulen-inspired projects around the world

    JOHANNESBURG (AP) — In past years, big names in South Africa picked up the annual Gulen Peace Award, a local accolade inspired by a Turkish preacher who has been blamed by Turkey for an attempted coup last month.

  • Veiled women walk in central Algiers, Wednesday Aug. 10, 2016.  Mosques are going up, women are covering up and bars, restaurants and shops selling alcoholic beverages are shutting down in a changing Algeria where, slowly but surely, Muslim fundamentalists are gaining ground.(AP Photo/Ouahab Hebbat)

    Fundamentalists gain ground in Algeria as war memory fades

    ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) — Mosques are going up, women are covering up, and shops selling alcoholic beverages are shutting down in a changing Algeria where, slowly but surely, Muslim fundamentalists are gaining ground.

  • In this photo taken Tuesday April, 5. 2016 author Hadiza Nuhu Gudaji, reads through one of her novels in her bedroom in Kano, Nigeria. In the local market stalls are signs of a feminist revolution with piles of poorly printed books by women, as part of a flourishing literary movement centered in the ancient city of Kano, that advocate against conservative Muslim traditions such as child marriage and quick divorces.  dozens of young women are rebelling through romance novels, many hand-written in the Hausa language, and the romances now run into thousands of titles.  (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

    Romances by women authors in Nigeria challenge traditions

    KANO, Nigeria (AP) — Nestled among vegetables, plastic kettles and hand-dyed fabric in market stalls are the signs of a feminist revolution: Piles of poorly printed books by women that advocate forcefully against conservative Muslim traditions such as child marriage and quick divorce.