• In this Feb. 22, 2015 file photo, Syrian Kurdish militia members of the YPG make a V-sign next to a drawing of Abdullah Ocalan, jailed Kurdish rebel leader, in Esme village in Aleppo province, Syria. A Turkish military expedition into Syria has threatened a Kurdish political project just as Kurdish forces seemed on the verge of connecting their northern Syrian zones. It is the first Turkish ground intervention in the course of the Syria war, now in its sixth year, and it underscores how seriously Turkey is taking Kurdish autonomy next door. (Mursel Coban/Depo Photos via AP, File)

    Syria’s Kurds: An embattled US ally in a complex civil war

    BEIRUT (AP) — Syria’s battle-hardened Kurds have proven their mettle against the Islamic State group, and in the process, carved out an autonomous zone across the country’s north. But their advance has alarmed Turkey, and Ankara on Wednesday sent tanks across the border against IS, and demanded that the Kurds withdraw from recently seized territory.

  • Raped and tortured by IS, Yazidi women recover in Germany

    VILLINGEN-SCHWENNINGEN, Germany (AP) — The Yazidi girl had been in the safety of a refugee camp in Iraq for two weeks when she imagined she heard the voices of Islamic State fighters outside her tent.

  • In this August 17, 2016 photo, men wait outside a fenced area at the Dibaga Camp for displaced people, where newcomers are interrogated before being allowed to stay, in Hajj Ali, northern Iraq. As the Islamic State group loses ground in Iraq, the militants are showing strains in their rule over areas they still control, growing more brutal, killing deserters and relying on younger recruits, according to residents. The accounts pointed to the difficulties the extremist group is facing as Iraqi forces backed by the United States prepare for an assault on Mosul. (AP Photo/Alice Martins)

    IS struggles to retain grip as it loses ground in Iraq

    DIBAGA CAMP, Iraq (AP) — As the Islamic State group loses ground in Iraq, the militants are showing strains in their rule over areas they still control, growing more brutal, killing deserters and relying on younger and younger recruits, according to residents who fled battleground territories.