• Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa, Fla., Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. (Loren Elliott/The Tampa Bay Times via AP)

    WHY IT MATTERS: Trade

    WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: In this angry election year, many American voters are deeply skeptical about free trade — or downright hostile to it.

  • In this June 10, 2005 file photo, workers walk past a part of the Qinshan No. 2 Nuclear Power Plant, China's first self-designed and self-built national commercial nuclear power plant in Qinshan, about 125 kilometers (about 90 miles) southwest of Shanghai, China. Beijing's wants to compete with the United States, France and Russia as an exporter of atomic power technology. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    China sets sights on new global export: nuclear energy

    BEIJING (AP) — On a seaside field south of Shanghai, workers are constructing a nuclear reactor that is the flagship for Beijing’s ambition to compete with the United States, France and Russia as an exporter of atomic power technology.

  • In this May 28, 2016, file photo, Tibetan exhibitors check on their phones at their booth displaying their products during the China International Fair and Trade in Beijing. Tensions have been rising over China’s assertive behavior in the seas of Asia. The U.S. also accuses China of unfair trading practices and cyber theft of business secrets. Donald Trump says that the sheer volume of trade gives the U.S. leverage over China. He accuses China of undervaluing its currency to make its exports artificially cheap and proposes tariffs as high as 45 percent on Chinese imports if Beijing doesn’t change its behavior. Such action could risk a trade war that would make many products in the U.S. more expensive. Clinton says the U.S. needs to press the rising Asian power to play by international rules, whether on trade or territorial disputes. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

    WHY IT MATTERS: China

    WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: Tensions have been rising between China and the United States. China is modernizing its military and pressing its sovereignty claims over the disputed South China Sea, an important route for global trade. The U.S. is pushing back by increasing its military presence in Asia, which China views as provocative. The U.S. also accuses China of unfair trading practices and cyber theft of business secrets. Tough action by either side could spark a skirmish at sea or a trade war that would make many goods in the U.S. more expensive.

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016 file photo, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, left, talks with Chinese Ambassador to the Philippines Zhao Jianhua, right, during the 115th Police Service Anniversary at the Philippine National Police (PNP) headquarters in Manila. Duterte said last week that he would not raise maritime disputes with China at a meeting of Southeast Asian nations in Laos next month, preferring to talk quietly with Chinese officials. (Noel Celis/Pool Photo via AP, File)

    Recent developments surrounding the South China Sea dispute

    BEIJING (AP) — A look at recent developments in the South China Sea, where China is pitted against smaller neighbors in multiple disputes over islands, coral reefs and lagoons in waters crucial for global commerce and rich in fish and potential gas and oil reserves:

  • In this Aug. 12, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gives a thumbs up as he leaves a campaign rally in Altoona, Pa. While Donald Trump's chief economic pitch is decrying foreign trade, the audience for his argument is shrinking by the day in the state most pivotal to his shot at the presidency. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

    In North Carolina, audience shrinking for Trump’s message

    ASHEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — Hillary Clinton “owes the state of North Carolina a very big apology,” Donald Trump thundered, condemning the loss of manufacturing jobs due to free-trade deals supported by the Democratic presidential nominee.

  • This July 9, 2015 photo shows a Wall Street sign near the New York Stock Exchange in New York.  World stock markets turned lower on Friday, Aug. 19, 2016 as investors speculated whether the U.S. Federal Reserve will raise interest rates in coming months. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    US stocks skid as market heads lower for the week

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks took small losses Friday to end a quiet week of trading. Energy companies fell as a rally in oil prices faded and investors continue to sell the safe assets they favored earlier this year. Technology and materials companies made small gains.

  • Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks over the crowd during his campaign rally Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016 in West Bend, Wis. (John Ehlke/West Bend Daily News via AP)

    How the Trump and Clinton tax plans would affect Americans

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For America’s wealthiest families, the presidential campaign presents a stark choice: A big tax increase if Hillary Clinton wins the election — or a big tax cut if Donald Trump wins.