• In this Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016 file photo, Filipino Muslims shout slogans during a protest at the Philippine Congress in suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines because they believe the Philippine Congress has run out of time to pass under the current president's term a Muslim autonomy bill that aims to peacefully settle a decades-long Muslim rebellion in the south. The Philippine government and Muslim rebels have extended the stay of international cease-fire monitors at their first meeting since their peace pact stalled amid fears of fresh fighting. In their joint statement issued Friday, Feb. 12, government negotiator Miriam Coronel-Ferrer and her rebel counterpart, Mohagher Iqbal, expressed disappointment over Philippine Congress's failure to pass a Muslim autonomy bill that's required under a 2014 peace accord that ended decades of fighting in the southern Philippines. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)

    Philippines, rebels fortify truce amid stalled peace pact

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The Philippine government and Muslim rebels have extended the stay of international cease-fire monitors at their first meeting since their peace pact stalled amid fears of fresh fighting.

  • Jan Egeland, Senior Advisor to the United Nations Special Envoy for Syria, speaks  at the European headquarters of the United Nations, in Geneva, Switzerland, on Friday, Feb. 12, 2016.  (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

    Diplomats aim for temporary Syria truce in a week

    BEIRUT (AP) — A diplomatic push for a temporary pause in Syria’s civil war and the delivery of humanitarian aid faced huge hurdles Friday, with Russia saying it would continue its airstrikes and government planes dropping leaflets urging rebels to surrender because “the belt is narrowing around you.”

    Updated: 5:08 pm

  • In this Jan. 10, 2016 file photo, a protester wearing a mask of missing bookseller Lee Bo sits in a cage during a protest against the disappearances of booksellers in Hong Kong. Britain says the missing Hong Kong bookseller was likely abducted to mainland China in what it says is a "serious breach" of the treaty under which Beijing took control of the city. British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond said in a twice-yearly report on Hong Kong affairs released Thursday, Feb. 11, that Lee was "involuntarily removed" to the mainland. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)

    UK: Hong Kong bookseller ‘removed’ in breach of China treaty

    HONG KONG (AP) — Britain says a missing Hong Kong bookseller was likely abducted to mainland China, calling it a “serious breach” of the treaty under which Beijing took control of the city.

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    Today in History