• China's Margaret Chan, Director General of the World Health Organization, WHO, addresses her statement, during the 69th World Health Assembly at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, Monday, May 23, 2016. (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP)

    UN health agency gets OK for revamp of emergency response

    GENEVA (AP) — Stung by failures in its response to Ebola, the World Health Organization is revamping how it responds to emergencies to become nimbler, more reactive and more operational in “one of the most profound transformations” ever at the U.N. health agency.

  • This photo taken Thursday, May 12, 2016, shows mosquito larvas breeding in a plastic pot with standing water, outside a home in Rio, Fla. The dengue fever outbreak that infected 28 people in August and September of 2013 caught Florida's Atlantic coast by surprise. The mosquito-borne disease many associate with crowded, third-world conditions had spread among the pink plastic flamingoes in their modest suburban yards. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

    Brazilian health minister updates IOC on anti-Zika measures

    LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Brazil’s health minister briefed IOC officials Tuesday on the steps being taken to combat the Zika virus ahead of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics.

  • Northern Ireland's Rory McIlroy holds the trophy after winning the Irish Open at The K Club, County Kildare, Ireland, Sunday May 22, 2016. (Brian Lawless/PA via AP) UNITED KINGDOM OUT

    Rory McIlroy concerned about Zika ahead of Olympics

    LONDON (AP) — Rory McIlroy has concerns about the Zika virus as he prepares to play at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics.

  • In this Saturday, May 21, 2016 photo, a vendor combs another woman's hair next to a water canal full of rubbish, fertile ground for mosquito-borne diseases, near a street market in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Haiti’s government has stepped up fumigation and public service announcements about the importance of getting rid of mosquito breeding grounds, but mosquito control is minimal compared to more developed nations. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

    Concern in Haiti over emerging condition linked to Zika

    MIREBALAIS, Haiti (AP) — Berny Saint-Sauveur was moaning and incoherent when his family carried him into a hospital in central Haiti. He was unable to move, he later found out, because of an unusual paralysis syndrome linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus.

  • In this May 24, 2012, file photo, United States Olympic Committee  Secretary General Scott Blackmun discusses with the media an agreement between the IOC and the USOC at the SportAccord conference in Quebec City. In an interview Friday, May 20, 2106,  with The Associated Press, Blackmun said if stories of the Russian lab director's elaborate plans to keep the country's athletes from testing positive at the Sochi Games turn out to be true, then, in his words, "we need to admit the system is flawed." (Francis Vachon/The Canadian Press via AP, File) MANDATORY CREDIT

    USOC leader: Flawed anti-doping system needs attention

    The leader of the U.S. Olympic Committee says the latest anti-doping headlines make it “increasingly difficult to defend the current system.”

  • This May 11, 2016, photo, shows the outside of CRF Frozen Foods, LLC, in Pasco, Wash. The company shut down its processing operations over a listeria breakout that has sickened customers in several states. (Sarah Gordon/The Tri-City Herald via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL RADIO OUT KONA

    Frozen food recall covers hundreds of items from many stores

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Amid a massive frozen foods recall involving millions of packages of fruits and vegetables that were shipped to all 50 U.S. states, Canada and Mexico, authorities who want to stem the listeria-linked illnesses and deaths worry it’ll be difficult to get consumers to dig through their freezers and check for products they may have bought as far back as 2014.

  • In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The number of pregnant women in the United States infected with Zika virus is suddenly tripling, due to a change in how the government is counting cases.  In a change announced Friday, May 20, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will count all women who tested positive,  regardless of whether they had suffered symptoms.  (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)

    Pregnant women in US with Zika spikes on new counting method

    NEW YORK (AP) — The number of pregnant women in the United States infected with Zika virus is suddenly tripling, due to a change in how the government is reporting cases.

  • APNewsBreak: Zika leads USA Swimming to dump Puerto Rico

    ATLANTA (AP) — USA Swimming has moved a pre-Olympic training camp out of Puerto Rico because of the Zika virus.

  • In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The Dominican Republic on Thursday, May 19, reported two new deaths from Guillain-Barre syndrome, a rare illness of the nervous system that can cause paralysis, linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus that is spreading through the hemisphere. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)

    Zika leads USA Swimming to move camp out of Puerto Rico

    ATLANTA (AP) — Concerned about the threat of the Zika virus, USA Swimming has moved a pre-Olympic training camp from Puerto Rico to Atlanta.

  • In this Wednesday, April 20, 2016 photo, sisters Patricia Ann Jirak, left, and Catherine Jirak Monetti, pose holding a photograph of their sister, Carolyn, in Mineola, N.Y. Carolyn Jirak is one of the disabled people who have died in state care since 2013 in Suffolk County with abuse or neglect allegations, yet none has resulted in criminal charges. The sisters contend Carolyn's death followed weeks of mistreatment. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman)

    9 deaths, no charges raise questions about oversight agency

    MINEOLA, N.Y. (AP) — Little more than names and incident numbers appear on a Long Island medical examiner’s list of nine developmentally disabled people who died in state care since 2013, but this much is known for sure: All the deaths came under a cloud of abuse or neglect allegations, and none resulted in criminal charges.