• New Mexico lawmaker eyes ‘right to die’ bill amid court loss

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico state lawmaker is pushing for a law to allow terminally ill patients to end their lives with help from doctors a month after advocates for the practice suffered a court defeat.

    Updated: 8:35 am

  • In this June 14, 2011 file photo, various prescription drugs on the automated pharmacy assembly line at Medco Health Solutions in Willingboro, N.J. A safeguard for Medicare beneficiaries has become a way for drugmakers to get paid billions of dollars for pricey medications at taxpayer expense, government numbers show. The cost of Medicare’s “catastrophic” prescription coverage jumped by 85 percent in three years, from $27.7 billion in 2013 to $51.3 billion in 2015, according to the program’s number-crunching Office of the Actuary.  (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

    AP Exclusive: Pricey drugs overwhelm Medicare safeguard

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A safeguard for Medicare beneficiaries has become a way for drugmakers to get paid billions of dollars for pricey medications at taxpayer expense, government numbers show.

  • In this photo taken Thursday, July 21, 2016, farmer John Lavoie walks through drying strawberry patch in Hollis, N.H. Parts of the Northeast are in the grips of a drought that has led to water restrictions, wrought havoc on gardens and raised concerns among farmers. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    West Coast style weather strikes Northeastern US

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — At Lavoie’s Farm in New Hampshire, beans and corn haven’t broken through the ground yet and fields of strawberries are stunted.

  • In this June 14, 2011 file photo, various prescription drugs on the automated pharmacy assembly line at Medco Health Solutions in Willingboro, N.J. A safeguard for Medicare beneficiaries has become a way for drugmakers to get paid billions of dollars for pricey medications at taxpayer expense, government numbers show. The cost of Medicare’s “catastrophic” prescription coverage jumped by 85 percent in three years, from $27.7 billion in 2013 to $51.3 billion in 2015, according to the program’s number-crunching Office of the Actuary.  (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

    AP Exclusive: Medicare safeguard overwhelmed by pricey drugs

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A safeguard for Medicare beneficiaries has become a way for drugmakers to get paid billions of dollars for pricey medications at taxpayer expense, government numbers show.

  • In this Feb. 13, 2014, file photo, a worker attaches a banner to a scaffolding in New Orleans in preparation of the NBA All-Star basketball game. The league took the 2017 game out of Charlotte on Thursday, July 21, 2016,  because of its objections to a North Carolina law that limits anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay and transgender people. As the NBA looks for a new home for the 2017 All-Star Game, cities are lining up with open arms to welcome LeBron James, Stephen Curry and the hundred million or so dollars they would bring to the local economy. New Orleans is the favorite, with one official familiar with the discussions telling The Associated Press that the league and city are “deep in negotiations” to stage the game there for a third time.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

    Blame game follows NBA’s removal of Charlotte All-Star game

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NBA All-Star Game’s exit from North Carolina because of a law limiting protections for LGBT people represents some of the worst publicity yet for Republican Gov. Pat McCrory’s re-election campaign, even as he dismisses the move as political correctness gone too far.

  • Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., listens to community leaders at a roundtable discussion on religious freedom with the regional interfaith community at All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Mosque in Sterling, Va., Thursday, July 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Kaine liberal appeal muted by energy ties, abortion concerns

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine are closely aligned on many issues, but Kaine’s cautious, left-leaning political profile in a closely contested state is blurred by his ties to energy industry interests and his personal qualms over abortion.

  • This photo combo shows signage for health insurers Humana Inc., Aetna Inc., Cigna Corp., and Anthem Inc. On Thursday, July 21, 2016, federal regulators said they are suing to stop two major health insurance mergers because they say the deals will increase health care costs for Americans and lower the quality of care they get. The Department of Justice said that the combinations of Aetna and Humana and Anthem and Cigna would hurt competition that restrains the price of coverage and reduce benefits, among other drawbacks. (AP Photo)

    Feds say health mergers would increase costs, threaten care

    WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) — The U.S. government is suing to stop two major health insurance mergers, a move regulators say is needed to protect Americans from potential cost hikes and lower quality care.

  • Russian athlete Vera Rudakova speaks to the media at the Russian Athletics Cup, at Zhukovsky, outside Moscow, Russia, Thursday, July 21, 2016. Russia lost its appeal Thursday against the Olympic ban on its track and field athletes, a decision which could add pressure on the IOC to exclude the country entirely from next month's games in Rio de Janeiro. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

    Russia’s track and field stars angered by Rio Olympics ban

    ZHUKOVSKY, Russia (AP) — Russia’s top athletes reacted with anger after the news broke Thursday that their track and field team would remain banned from next month’s Rio de Janeiro Olympics.

  • China vows zero-tolerance on doping for Olympic team

    BEIJING (AP) — Seeking to dismiss lingering doubts, a top Chinese sports official says the country has committed to a zero-tolerance stance on doping ahead of the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

  • In this Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, file photo, the JPMorgan Chase & Co. logo is displayed at their headquarters in New York. In a massive policy shift, the Republican Party has adopted a platform position where they advocate for the reinstatement of the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933, a Great Depression-era law that regulated the U.S. banking industry until it was repealed in 1999. A passage of Glass-Steagall would cause a break-up of the big banks. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

    In surprise, GOP looks to revive Depression-era banking law

    NEW YORK (AP) — The Republican Party has taken a page straight out of the campaign books of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.