• In this Oct. 11, 2011 photo, the damaged Vermont State Hospital is seen in Waterbury, Five years after flooding from Tropical Storm Irene forced the closing of the Vermont State Hospital in Waterbury, much of the system has been rebuilt, but challenges remain. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, file)

    After Irene forces reckoning, mental health care rebuilt

    MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — For most Vermonters, Tropical Storm Irene was a disaster that tore roads, communities and lives apart. But for many of the state’s neediest mental health patients, it was a blessing in disguise.

  • New Mexico regulators want more info from PNM in rate case

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico utility regulators want to reopen hearings on a proposal by the state’s largest electric provider to raise customer rates.

  • Docs ask feds to probe use of live animals at USC med school

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The emergency-medicine training program at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine violates federal law by using live animals, according to a complaint filed Thursday by a doctors group that seeks alternatives to using animals in medical education and research.

  • Correction: Water Park-Fatality-Regulation story

    TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — In a story Aug. 12 about the regulation in Kansas for amusement park rides, The Associated Press erroneously reported that South Dakota was among the states that have no laws regulating the industry. South Dakota passed a law requiring inspections in 2014.

  • West Virginia permanently halts coal mine by state forest

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia environmental regulators have ordered a company to stop mining permanently at a surface coal mine near Kanawha State Forest.

  • In this Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015 file photo, amusement device inspector Avery Wheelock inspects the safety pins on a children's merry-go-round at the Mississippi State Fair in Jackson, Miss. In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

    Thrill-ride accidents spark new demands for regulation

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — In a story Aug. 22 about the lack of unified regulation for amusement park rides, The Associated Press erroneously reported which states have no laws regulating the industry. Montana was omitted from the list, which also includes Alabama, Mississippi, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. It also incorrectly included South Dakota, which passed a law requiring inspections in 2014.