• This Monday, Aug. 11, 2015, file photo, shows a Target store in Miami. Consumer backlash is growing against Target’s stance on what type of bathrooms its transgender customers and employees can use. In April 2016, the Minneapolis-based discounter issued a statement that said customers and employees can use the restroom or fitting room that “corresponds to their gender identity.” The move made Target the first major retailer to take such a prominent position on the issue, and won praise from supporters of transgender rights. But Target’s position also sparked criticism on social media that hasn’t let up. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

    Target faces backlash on stance on transgender bathrooms

    NEW YORK (AP) — Consumer backlash is growing against Target’s stance on what type of bathrooms its transgender customers and employees can use.

  • AP sources: Takata recall could more than double in size

    DETROIT (AP) — U.S. auto safety regulators are in talks with Takata Corp. to add tens of millions of air bag inflators to what already is the biggest auto recall in American history, three people briefed on the matter said Tuesday.

  • This Thursday, April 12, 2012, file photo, shows the Google logo displayed at the company's headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. Fiat Chrysler and Google announced Tuesday, May 3, 2016, that they will work together to more than double the size of Google's self-driving vehicle fleet by adding 100 Chrysler Pacifica minivans. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

    Fiat Chrysler, Google to cooperate on autonomous minivans

    DETROIT (AP) — Fiat Chrysler and Google will work together to more than double the size of Google’s self-driving vehicle fleet by adding 100 Chrysler Pacifica minivans.

  • In this Thursday, April 28, 2016, file photo, trader David O'Day works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. U.S. companies are on track for their third straight decline in quarterly earnings, the worst streak since the financial crisis, a result of low oil prices and weak economic growth. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    Corporate earnings keep falling, but there are signs of life

    NEW YORK (AP) — Are we there yet? It’s another weak quarter on Wall Street, but there are some signs corporate America will come out of its recent funk.

  • In this March 16, 2016 file photo, a woman holds up a poster with a photo of slain environmental leader Berta Caceres during a protest in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Caceres reported receiving threats from DESA security personnel, as well as an attempt by a company official to bribe her to call off the demonstrations, according to Billy Kyte, a senior campaigner on land and environmental defense at London-based Global Witness. DESA, or Desarrollos Energeticos SA, is the company carrying out the Agua Zarca hydroelectric project that Caceres lead protests against. (AP Photo/Fernando Antonio, File)

    Court files show bid to tar slain Honduran activist Caceres

    TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) — For months before her death, environmental activist Berta Caceres complained of repeated threats warning her to stop leading protests opposing a hydroelectric project on her Lenca people’s ancestral lands.

  • In this April 6, 2016, photo, a newly completed Titan rolls off the line at the Nissan Canton Vehicle Assembly Plant in Canton, Miss. America’s love of trucks and SUVs helped push most automakers to healthy sales gains in April 2016 as Honda and Nissan reported best-ever April sales. Ford posted record SUV sales, while Toyota broke a record for SUV and truck sales. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

    Honda, Nissan break records as auto sales stay hot in April

    DETROIT (AP) — America’s love of trucks and SUVs helped push the auto industry to its best April ever, with most automakers reporting healthy increases.

  • In this Feb. 22, 2015 file photo, Beyonce arrives at the 2015 Vanity Fair Oscar Party in Beverly Hills, Calif. WTRMLN WTR, a startup beverage company that makes cold-pressed watermelon juice, announced on Tuesday, May 3, 2016, that Beyonce has joined as an investor. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

    Beyonce goes from ‘Lemonade’ to watermelon water

    NEW YORK (AP) — When life handed Beyonce lemons, she made … watermelon water?

  • Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton laughs with Scott Conley while talking to steelworkers in Ashland, Ky., Monday, May 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

    Once a Clinton stronghold, Appalachia now Trump country

    ASHLAND, Ky. (AP) — When President Bill Clinton rolled into the small Appalachian town of Ashland, Kentucky, in 1996, cheering crowds lined the streets. Local boy-turned-country music star Billy Ray Cyrus performed a special version of his hit, “Achy Breaky Heart” before nearly 20,000 supporters at a riverfront re-election rally.

  • In this Tuesday, April 12, 2016 photo, Sewage flows from an outlet into the sea in front of Shati refugee camp in Gaza City. Each day, millions of gallons of raw sewage pour into the Gaza Strip's Mediterranean beachfront, spewing out of a metal pipe and turning miles of once-scenic coastline into a stagnant dead zone. The sewage has damaged Gaza's limited fresh water supplies, decimated fishing zones, and after years of neglect, is now floating northward and affecting Israel as well, where a nearby desalination plant was forced to shut down, apparently due to pollution. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

    Gaza sewage poisons coastline, threatens Israel

    SHATI REFUGEE CAMP, Gaza Strip (AP) — Each day, millions of gallons of raw sewage pour into the Gaza Strip’s Mediterranean beachfront, spewing out of a metal pipe and turning miles of once-scenic coastline into a stagnant dead zone.

  • In this Oct. 3, 2014, file photo, Jon Huntsman Sr. speaks to reporters during a news conference in Salt Lake City. The Salt Lake Tribune's pending sale to the wealthy Huntsman family unshackles the newspaper from cost-cutting corporate owners and resolves crippling uncertainty, but it also raises concerns about whether the influential family will meddle in the paper's coverage. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

    Rich newspaper owners: Industry saviors or foes?

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Salt Lake Tribune’s pending sale to the wealthy Huntsman family unshackles the newspaper from cost-cutting corporate owners and resolves crippling financial uncertainty, but it also raises concerns about whether the influential family will meddle in the paper’s coverage.