• In this picture taken on Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, owner of Euro Security Products, a self defense equipment company, Bretislav Kostal displays a stun gun in Prague, Czech Republic. After the attacks in Paris and New Year’s security scares, Germans have been snapping up self-defense equipment like stun guns _ to the delight of a Czech manufacturer who corners the market. Prague-based Euro Security Products, or ESP, has been flooded by new orders from Germany for stun guns and can’t keep up with demand. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

    Stun guns in demand in Germany amid security concerns

    PRAGUE (AP) — After the attacks in Paris and New Year’s security scares, Germans have been snapping up self-defense equipment like stun guns — to the delight of a Czech manufacturer who corners the market.

  • Gallup senator’s detox center proposal goes before committee

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A proposal to fund detox and substance abuse treatment centers for the homeless with money from the state’s liquor excise tax is scheduled to go before the state Senate Corporations and Transportation Committee on Monday.

  • Bruins prospect Subban stable after fracturing larynx

    BOSTON (AP) — Boston Bruins prospect Malcolm Subban is in stable condition after fracturing his larynx during an American Hockey League game on Saturday.

  • People watch a TV news reporting a rocket launch in North Korea, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. For North Korea's propaganda machine, the long-range rocket launch Sunday carved a glorious trail of "fascinating vapor" through the clear blue sky. For South Korea's president, and other world leaders, it was a banned test of dangerous ballistic missile technology and yet another "intolerable provocation." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    The Latest: S. Korea to begin talks on US missile defense

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Latest on North Korea’s launch of a long-range rocket (all times local):

  • In this image released by Japan's Kyodo News agency, an unidentified object is photographed in the sky from Dandong, China, near the North Korean border, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016, at the same time a North Korea rocket was allegedly launched. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. (Minoru Iwasaki/Kyodo News via AP) JAPAN OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT

    N. Korea praises launch, others see as covert missile test

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea’s launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another “intolerable provocation.” The U.N.’s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with “significant” new sanctions.

  • The Italian ambassador's vehicle leaves the Italian Hospital in Cairo after a a private mass at the church in the hospital complex for slain Italian graduate student Giulio Regeni on Friday, Feb. 5, 2016. Regeni, a 28-year-old Cambridge University PhD candidate who had been researching labor rights in Egypt, went missing on Jan. 25, the fifth anniversary of the popular uprising that toppled longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak. His body was found Wednesday bearing signs of torture. (AP Photo/Belal Darder)

    Body of Italian student found in Cairo flown back to Italy

    CAIRO (AP) — The body of the Italian student who was found this week in a Cairo suburb was flown back to Italy Saturday morning, Egyptian airport officials and Italy’s foreign minister said.

  • A screen advertising a demilitarized zone (DMZ) train tour is displayed near Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016. Another big North Korea news story, another collective yawn from South Koreans. Many in the South either don’t know or don’t care about their rival’s declared plan to launch a rocket this month that the world sees as a banned test of a ballistic missile that could hit the United States. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    Analysis: AP bureau chiefs in Koreas on planned launch

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — It’s another big, splashy step for the North Korean government: a planned rocket launch the world will see as a banned test of long-range missile technology that comes only weeks after testing what it said was a hydrogen bomb.

  • This Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016, photo shows heavy machinery adjacent to the proposed NFL Rams stadium complex site at Hollywood Park in Inglewood, Calif. The largest contiguous block of unoccupied land in the Los Angeles area will be the site of Rams owner Stan Kroenke’s lavish stadium and a massive surrounding complex. In the background is the former Hollywood Park. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

    Inglewood’s stadium rising soon, hoping to host Super Bowls

    INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP) — The 50-yard line is still dirt and weeds around a protruding yellow pipe used for water table measurement. There isn’t much more than vacant space and idle construction equipment within a few minutes’ walk in any direction.

  • A screen advertising a demilitarized zone (DMZ) train tour is displayed near Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016. Another big North Korea news story, another collective yawn from South Koreans. Many in the South either don’t know or don’t care about their rival’s declared plan to launch a rocket this month that the world sees as a banned test of a ballistic missile that could hit the United States. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    Analysis: AP bureau chiefs in Koreas on planned launch

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — It’s another big, splashy step for the North Korean government: a planned rocket launch the world will see as a banned test of long-range missile technology that comes only weeks after testing what it said was a hydrogen bomb.

  • In this Feb. 2, 2016 photo, Chen Xiao, a real estate agent, checks on her smartphone as she prepares to leave her house to go back to her hometown for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year, in Shanghai, China. The hundreds of millions of Chinese heading home for Lunar New Year have a relatively new travel option this year: mobile apps to find carpool partners to share costs in what is a novel concept for most Chinese. The apps give an alternative to pricey airfares and hard-to-score train tickets. (AP Photo/Paul Traynor)

    Chinese turn to carpooling aps to get ride home for holidays

    SHANGHAI (AP) — The hundreds of millions of Chinese heading home for Lunar New Year have a relatively new travel option this year: mobile apps to find carpool partners to share costs in what is a novel concept for most Chinese.