• This 1932 photo from the Los Angeles Herald Examiner Collection of the Los Angeles Public Library shows hundreds of Mexicans at a Los Angeles train station awaiting deportation to Mexico. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s call for mass deportation of millions of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, as well as their American-born children, bears similarities to a large-scale removal that actually happened to many Mexican-American families 85 years ago. During the Great Depression, counties and cities in the American Southwest and Midwest forced Mexican immigrants and their families to leave the U.S. over concerns they were taking jobs away from whites despite their legal right to stay. The traumatic impact of the experience on Latinos remains evident today, experts and advocates say.(Los Angeles Herald Examiner Collection/Los Angeles Public Library via AP)

    Trump’s deportation idea similar to 1930s mass removals

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s call for mass deportation of millions of immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, as well as their American-born children, bears similarities to a large-scale removal that many Mexican-American families faced 85 years ago.

  • In this photo made  Friday, Aug. 21, 2015, Sita Jaganath, 7, left, shows her father Siddharth Jaganath a math problem she worked out at their home in Plano, Texas.  U.S. Census Bureau research shows immigrants from China and India, many with student or work visas, have overtaken Mexicans as the largest groups coming into the U.S. Jaganath is an example of the new trend in immigration. He came to the U.S. to earn his master’s degree at Southern Methodist University. Instead of returning to India, he built a new life in the U.S. and is a manager at a communications technology company. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

    Immigration shift shows India, China outpacing Mexico

    DALLAS (AP) — Siddharth Jaganath wanted to return to India after earning his master’s degree at Texas’ Southern Methodist University. Instead, he built a new life in the U.S. over a decade, becoming a manager at a communications technology company and starting a family in the Dallas suburb of Plano.

  • Thursday, August 27, 2015

    Calm on Wall Street: A turbulent week ends on a placid note, but has the storm passed?

  • Univision journalist Jorge Ramos, right, asks Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump a question regarding immigration issues during a news conference on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 in Dubuque, Iowa.   (Nicki Kohl/Telegraph Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    Experts: Trump, Ramos confrontation shouldn’t be a surprise

    NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump’s onscreen confrontation with Univision’s Jorge Ramos on Tuesday over the Republican presidential candidate’s immigration plan should only be a surprise to those who don’t know Ramos.

  • Miami-based Univision anchor Jorge Ramos, left, asks Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump a question about his immigration proposal during a news conference, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015, in Dubuque, Iowa. Ramos was later removed from the room. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

    Trump starts new media feud with Univision anchor Ramos

    PENSACOLA, Florida (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said Wednesday he’s proud of kicking one of the country’s best-known Spanish-language journalists out of an Iowa news conference — the latest in a series of clashes with the media.

  • Miami-based Univision anchor Jorge Ramos, left, asks Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump a question about his immigration proposal during a news conference, Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015, in Dubuque, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

    Trump has Univision anchor removed from new conference

    DUBUQUE, Iowa (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump engaged in a prolonged confrontation with the anchor of the nation’s leading Spanish-language network during a news conference Tuesday, first having the well-known news personality removed before allowing him back in.