• Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump smiles as he addresses delegates during the final day session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Thursday, July 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

    Critics: Trump speech signals shift to coded race language

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — During the primaries, Donald Trump threw red-meat rhetoric to supporters, pledging to build a wall on the Mexico border and to ban Muslim immigrants. He even told at least one crowd that he wanted to punch a demonstrator who disrupted an event.

  • In this Sunday, June 26, 2016 photo, church-goers at the Norwich Chinese Christian Church in Norwich, Conn., participate in a potluck dinner following a Sunday service at the church. A Chinese immigrant community has been growing for more than a decade in Connecticut around two of the nation’s largest casinos. Many have been drawn by good-paying jobs and a quieter life. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

    Fortune, friction and decline as casino ‘Chinatown’ matures

    UNCASVILLE, Conn. (AP) — No ornate archway marks it. No obvious business district with exotic signs and storefronts sets it apart. But in the quiet neighborhoods around two of the nation’s largest casinos, a sort of suburban Chinatown has been growing for over a decade.

  • A Code Pink activist is covered by American flags during the second day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

    AP EXPLAINS: Why do Republicans say sky is falling? Is it?

    The United States depicted at the Republican National Convention is a scary place. It is wrenched by economic uncertainty, social upheaval, political dysfunction, runaway immigration, violent streets and existential threats from abroad. Republicans want voters to see the need for drastic change. The nation’s only choice, they say, is Donald Trump.

  • Billy Prater, 27, adjusts a Donald Trump sign on his fence in Beech Creek, W.Va., in Mingo County on April 28, 2016. Laid off from the mines, he had been out of work for more than a year. Now he works for the railroad, but the major customer is the collapsing coal industry so his work is unsteady. He was a registered Democrat from a family of diehard Democrats. But when he hung the Trump sign, his neighbors started calling and sending him messages, asking where he got it and how to get their own. "Everybody on this creek wants one," he said. "He's honest. He says thing that he probably shouldn't say. We respect that, because it means he's not buttering us up." (AP Photo/Claire Galofaro)

    DIVIDED AMERICA: To some, Trump is a desperate survival bid

    LOGAN, W.Va. (AP) — Mike Kirk leans across the counter of the pawnshop where he works for $11 an hour. It’s less than half what he made in the mines, but the best he can do these days.

  • Billy Prater, 27, adjusts a Donald Trump sign on his fence in Beech Creek, W.Va., in Mingo County on April 28, 2016. Laid off from the mines, he had been out of work for more than a year. Now he works for the railroad, but the major customer is the collapsing coal industry so his work is unsteady. He was a registered Democrat from a family of diehard Democrats. But when he hung the Trump sign, his neighbors started calling and sending him messages, asking where he got it and how to get their own. "Everybody on this creek wants one," he said. "He's honest. He says thing that he probably shouldn't say. We respect that, because it means he's not buttering us up." (AP Photo/Claire Galofaro)

    DIVIDED AMERICA: To some, Trump is a desperate survival bid

    LOGAN, W.Va. (AP) — Mike Kirk leans across the counter of the pawnshop where he works for $11 an hour. It’s less than half what he made in the mines, but the best he can do these days.