• The Corrections Corporation of America headquarters are shown Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016, in Nashville, Tenn. Private prison operator CCA wants to seal from public view documents in a lawsuit that claims female visitors to a Tennessee prison were forced to undergo strip searches to prove they were menstruating. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

    Prison company fights to seal documents about strip searches

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Private prison operator Corrections Corporation of America is trying to seal from public view documents in a lawsuit that claim female visitors to a Tennessee prison were forced to undergo strip searches to prove they were menstruating.

  • Raped and tortured by IS, Yazidi women recover in Germany

    VILLINGEN-SCHWENNINGEN, Germany (AP) — The Yazidi girl had been in the safety of a refugee camp in Iraq for two weeks when she imagined she heard the voices of Islamic State fighters outside her tent.

  • This undated photo provided by William Herron, shows Rosalind Alexander-Kasparik, left, and her fiance, David Rector, who is seeking to have his voting rights restored five years after a judge ruled that a traumatic brain injury disqualified him from casting a ballot in San Diego. As the November election neared, it looked like Rector would once again be unable to vote. Then the 66-year-old former National Public Radio producer learned about a California law that took effect Jan. 1, that makes it easier for people with developmental disabilities to keep and regain the right to vote, if they can express a desire to vote. On Tuesday, Aug. 23, Rector will seek to have his voting rights restored and advocates representing him and others who have been disqualified will file a complaint with the U.S. Justice Department asking that the state be required to notify them of the new law in time for the Nov. 8 ballot. (William Herron via AP)

    Disabled California man seeks to have voting rights restored

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — A former producer at NPR who lost his ability to walk and speak asked a judge Tuesday to restore his right to vote under a new California law that makes it easier for people with disabilities to keep that right and regain it if lost.

  • In this Aug. 16, 2016 photo, Matthew Kane charges his phone while panhandling at a wi-fi kiosk at 39th Street and 8th Avenue in New York. Kane, who said he's couch surfing in New York after moving here recently from Pittsburgh, was taking advantage of an ambitious public-private partnership that has converted hundreds of obsolete New York City phone booths into wi-fi kiosks offering free internet access, phone charging and domestic calls.. (AP Photo/Karen Matthews)

    Wi-Fi? Why not? Homeless are avid users of NYC’s free kiosks

    NEW YORK (AP) — An effort to replace obsolete pay phones with Wi-Fi kiosks that offer free web surfing and phone calls has been a hit with panhandlers and the homeless, the least wired people in the city.

  • In this Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016 photo, a selection of private medical files published by transparency website WikiLeaks is shown in Paris. WikiLeaks’ global crusade to expose government secrets is causing collateral damage to the privacy of hundreds of innocent people, including survivors of sexual abuse, sick children and the mentally ill, The Associated Press has found.(AP Photo/Raphael Satter)

    Private lives are exposed as WikiLeaks spills its secrets

    CAIRO (AP) — Its scoops have rattled the Saudi foreign ministry, the National Security Agency and the U.S. Democratic Party. But WikiLeaks’ spectacular mass-disclosures have also hit hundreds of average people — including sick children, rape victims and mental patients — who just happened to find their personal information included in the group’s giant data dumps, The Associated Press has found.

  • In this Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016 photo, a selection of private medical files published by transparency website WikiLeaks is shown in Paris. WikiLeaks’ global crusade to expose government secrets is causing collateral damage to the privacy of hundreds of innocent people, including survivors of sexual abuse, sick children and the mentally ill, The Associated Press has found.(AP Photo/Raphael Satter)

    Private lives are exposed as WikiLeaks spills its secrets

    CAIRO (AP) — WikiLeaks’ giant data dumps have rattled the National Security Agency, the U.S. Democratic Party, and the Saudi foreign ministry. But its spectacular mass-disclosures have also included the personal information of hundreds of people — including sick children, rape victims and mental health patients, The Associated Press has found.

  • Susan Contreras stands next to her bed in a Phoenix-area shelter for victims of domestic violence on Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2016. Contreras is part of a unique program at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix that aims to assist abuse survivors who have suffered head trauma. (AP Photo/Beatriz Costa-Lima)

    Fists not football: Brain injuries seen in domestic assaults

    CHICAGO (AP) — There are no bomb blasts or collisions with burly linemen in Susan Contreras’ past. Her headaches, memory loss and bouts of confused thinking were a mystery until doctors suggested a probable cause: domestic violence.

  • In a May 31, 2014 file photo, acclaimed novelist Zadie Smith is shown signing a book for a fan in Treasure Beach, Jamaica. Fall is the time for "big books," whatever the page length, and some of the top fiction authors from around the world have new works coming in 2016, including Ian McEwan, Zadie Smith, Margaret Atwood, T. Coraghessan Boyle, Rabih Alameddine, Emma Donoghue, Jonathan Safran Foer and Michael Chabon. (AP Photo/David McFadden, File)

    Rich season of fiction expected this fall

    NEW YORK (AP) — For the weightiest novel this fall, or most any season, Alan Moore has the grandest ambition.

  • Homeless awareness campaign breaks fist-bumping record

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Three hundred people in Alaska looking to raise awareness of homelessness are the new world record holders in fist-bumping.

  • In a May 25, 2016 file photo, emergency personnel carrying a volunteer with simulated injuries is carried during a training exercise for an active shooter at Hopewell Elementary School, in West Chester, Ohio.  Violent or disruptive threats are increasing nationwide, according to police, school employees, security consultants and others, blamed sometimes on local students and sometimes on outsiders seeking to cause disruptions or a big emergency response. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

    When schools are threatened, untold learning time is lost

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The prosecutor calls it “bomb week,” his shorthand for eight school threats — many written in school bathrooms or on notes — over a few days in May that set off evacuations and investigations, parental panic, and the rumor mill of students linked by cellphones and social media in his Ohio county.