• In this photo taken Monday, July 25, 2016, some of the more than 30,000 Nuer civilians sheltering in a United Nations base in South Sudan's capital Juba for fear of targeted killings by government forces walk by an armored vehicle and a watchtower manned by Chinese peacekeepers. South Sudanese government soldiers raped dozens of ethnic Nuer women and girls last week just outside a United Nations camp where they had sought protection from renewed fighting, and at least two died from their injuries, witnesses and civilian leaders said. The rapes in the capital of Juba highlighted two persistent problems in the chaotic country engulfed by civil war: targeted ethnic violence and the reluctance by U.N. peacekeepers to protect civilians. (AP Photo/Jason Patinkin)

    Witnesses say South Sudan soldiers raped dozens near UN camp

    JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — South Sudanese government soldiers raped dozens of ethnic Nuer women and girls last week just outside a United Nations camp where they had sought protection from renewed fighting, and at least two died from their injuries, witnesses and civilian leaders said.

    Updated: 9:21 am

  • In this Saturday, July 16, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee Fawaz al-Jasem pulls weeds on a tomato farm in Ramtha, Jordan. He's among thousands of displaced Syrians who recently obtained work permits as part of Jordan's promise to the international community to put 50,000 refugees to work legally by the end of the year in exchange for interest-free loans and easier access to European markets. So far, some 23,000 Syrians have been given work permits in the kingdom under the deal, aimed in part at keeping refugees in the region with a promise of jobs and education for their children, and deterring them from moving on to Europe. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    Jordan deal with donors means legal work for Syria refugees

    RAMTHA, Jordan (AP) — Syrian refugee Fawaz al-Jasem used to drop his tools and run when he saw police approaching the farm in northern Jordan where he has been picking vegetables for the past three years.

  • A police officer talks with visitors in front of a facility for the handicapped where a number of people were killed and dozens injured in a knife attack Tuesday, July 26, 2016,  in Sagamihara, outside Tokyo. (Kyodo News via AP)

    The Latest: US statement expresses shock at Japan attack

    TOKYO (AP) — The Latest on a knife attack at facility for the handicapped outside Tokyo (all times local):

  • FILE- In this Saturday, July 23, 2016 file photo, German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives for a statement in Berlin, Germany, on the Munich attack. Four attacks in a week — three of them carried out by asylum seekers — have left Germany on edge and Chancellor Angela Merkel's policies of welcoming refugees under renewed criticism. Anxiety over Germany's ability to cope with last year's flood of more than 1 million registered asylum seekers first surged following a series of sexual assaults and robberies in Cologne during New Year celebrations.  (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, File)

    German refugee policy under fire after a week of bloodshed

    BERLIN (AP) — Four attacks in a week — three of them carried out by asylum seekers — have left Germany on edge and Chancellor Angela Merkel’s policies of welcoming refugees under renewed criticism.

  • People mourn beside the Olympia shopping center where a shooting took place leaving nine people dead two days ago in Munich, Germany, Sunday, July 24, 2016. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)

    Munich shooter was bullied loner, planned attack for a year

    MUNICH (AP) — The teenager behind the deadly shooting rampage in Munich was a withdrawn loner obsessed with playing “killer” video games in his bedroom, a victim of bullying who suffered from panic attacks set off by contacts with other people, investigators said Sunday, adding that he had planned the attack for a year.

  • Migrants and refugees that were marching in protest arrive at a border crossing between Serbia and Hungary in Horgos, some 160 kilometers (100 miles) northwest of Belgrade, Serbia, Sunday, July 24, 2016. Several dozen people arrived Sunday near Serbia's border with Hungary in a bid to protest its decision to keep the border shut for most asylum-seekers, which has left several thousand people stranded in Serbia. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

    Protesting migrants ask EU leaders why borders are closed

    HORGOS, Serbia (AP) — A group of migrants and asylum-seekers who set off two days ago on a protest march toward Hungary reached the European Union-member state’s border on Sunday, saying they want to ask European leaders why it is closed for the thousands fleeing war and poverty.

  • FILE- In this file photo dated Wednesday, June 22, 2016, Pope Francis walks with a group of refugees he invited to join him on the steps of St. Peter's Basilica during his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican.  Pope Francis begins a five-day visit to Poland on upcoming Wednesday July 27, 2016, and hopes to inspire aid to homeless strangers and acts of mercy for refugees during his visit, although Poland has closed its borders to refugees. (AP Photo/Fabio Frustaci, FILE)

    Francis and Poland differ on migrants ahead of pope’s visit

    VATICAN CITY (AP) — Support for migrants is so central to Pope Francis’ vision for the church that he has made welcoming them a potential test for those seeking entry to Heaven on Judgment Day.

  • Survey: Fewer teens drinking alcohol, smoking in New Mexico

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A recent state survey has found that New Mexico teenagers are consuming less alcohol as well as smoking fewer cigarettes.

  • 26,000 flee South Sudan to Uganda, says UN

    JOHANNESBURG (AP) — More than 26,000 people have fled South Sudan to Uganda this month, says the United Nations refugee agency.

  • Entrepreneur Peter Thiel speaks during the final day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Thursday, July 21, 2016. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Excited by Trump, gay Republicans struggle with rest of GOP

    CLEVELAND (AP) — With five letters, Donald Trump brushed off decades of Republican reluctance to voice full-throated support for gay rights — at least for a night.