• This undated photo provided by William Herron, shows Rosalind Alexander-Kasparik, left, and her fiance, David Rector, who is seeking to have his voting rights restored five years after a judge ruled that a traumatic brain injury disqualified him from casting a ballot in San Diego. As the November election neared, it looked like Rector would once again be unable to vote. Then the 66-year-old former National Public Radio producer learned about a California law that took effect Jan. 1, that makes it easier for people with developmental disabilities to keep and regain the right to vote, if they can express a desire to vote. On Tuesday, Aug. 23, Rector will seek to have his voting rights restored and advocates representing him and others who have been disqualified will file a complaint with the U.S. Justice Department asking that the state be required to notify them of the new law in time for the Nov. 8 ballot. (William Herron via AP)

    Disabled California man seeks to have voting rights restored

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — A former producer at NPR who lost his ability to walk and speak asked a judge Tuesday to restore his right to vote under a new California law that makes it easier for people with disabilities to keep that right and regain it if lost.

  • UN chief calls for renewed focus on mass destruction weapons

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday called on the international community to renew its commitment to eliminate weapons of mass destruction as technological advances make it cheaper and easier for terrorist groups to produce and deliver materials for making the weapons.

  • Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, front-centre, military commanders and ministers walk to the mausoleum of Turkey's founder Kemal Ataturk to pay respects, in Ankara, Turkey, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016. Turkish media reports say Turkish artillery on Tuesday launched new strikes at Islamic State targets across the border in Syria, after two mortar rounds, believed to have been fired by the militants, hit the town of Karkamis, in Turkey's Gaziantep province. Hurriyet newspaper and other reports said the mortar rounds were fired from IS-held Jarablus, Syria.(AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday:

  • Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and aide Huma Abedin, lower left, step from Clinton's campaign plane as they arrive at Van Nuys Airport in Van Nuys, Calif., Monday, Aug. 22, 2016, en route to a taping of "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Trump’s stamina attack on Clinton stirs talk of gender bias

    NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump and his Republican allies say Hillary Clinton is weak, lacks stamina and doesn’t look presidential.

  • Ahmad Al Faqi Al Mahdi appears at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Aug. 22, 2016, at the start of his trial on charges of involvement in the destruction of historic mausoleums in the Malian desert city of Timbuktu. Prosecutors allege that Al Mahdi was a member of an al Qaida-linked occupying force that destroyed most of Timbuktu's World Heritage-listed mausoleums in 2012. (AP Photo/Patrick Post, Pool)

    Malian extremist pleads guilty to Timbuktu rampage

    THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Expressing “deep regret” for his actions, an Islamic extremist pleaded guilty Monday to orchestrating the destruction of historic mausoleums in the Malian desert city of Timbuktu.

  • In this May 25, 2016, file photo, Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton announces Texas' lawsuit to challenge President Obama's transgender bathroom order during a news conference in Austin, Texas. A federal judge in Texas is blocking for now the Obama administration's directive to U.S. public schools that transgender students must be allowed to use the bathrooms and locker rooms consistent with their chosen gender identity. Paxton had argued that halting the law before school began was necessary because districts risked losing federal education dollars if they didn't comply. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP)

    Q&A: Judge blocks Obama directive over transgender students

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Answers to common questions about a ruling by a federal judge who blocked an Obama administration directive on bathroom rights for transgender students in U.S. public schools:

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • The statue of Barbara Johns with her hand outstretched, stands behind Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe as he speaks during a ceremony dealing with the restoration of rights at the Virginia Civil Rights memorial at the State Capitol in Richmond, Va., on Monday, Aug. 22, 2016. McAuliffe announced that he again restored the voting rights of about 13,000 felons who served their time after his previous attempt was thwarted by Republican lawmakers and the state Supreme Court. (Bob Brown/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)

    Voting rights restored again for 13K felons in Virginia

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A defiant Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe announced Monday that he again restored the voting rights of about 13,000 felons who served their time after his previous attempt was thwarted by Republican lawmakers and the state Supreme Court.

  • In this Nov. 9, 2015 file photo, Amy Robach attends the 25th Annual Glamour Women of the Year Awards in New York.  Robach has apologized for using a term for African Americans on Monday’s broadcast of the ABC program. After the broadcast, Robach released a statement explaining she had meant to say “people of color.”
She called the incident “a mistake” and “not at all a reflection of how I feel or speak in my everyday life.” (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

    ‘GMA’s’ Amy Robach says on-air racial slur ‘a mistake’

    NEW YORK (AP) — “Good Morning America” co-anchor Amy Robach has apologized for saying “colored people” on Monday’s broadcast of the ABC program.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.