• Starbucks barista Oliver Savage poses for a photo in front of a Starbucks store near where he works Monday, Aug. 29, 2016, in Seattle. Savage is joining other workers and city leaders in pushing for new "secure scheduling" rules for retail and food-service businesses with hourly employees, including requiring them to schedule shifts two weeks in advance, and offer hours to existing employees before hiring new staff. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Seattle weighs new rules for businesses with hourly workers

    SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle leaders have proposed new rules for retail and food-service businesses with hourly employees, including requiring them to schedule shifts two weeks in advance and compensate workers for some last-minute changes — the latest push by a city that has led the nation in mandating worker benefits.

  • In this Nov. 21, 2013, file photo, with the Empire State building in the background, the Macy's logo is illuminated on the front of the department store in New York. It turns out there’s a wealth gap among companies, just like among people. Of the $1.8 trillion in cash that’s sitting in U.S. corporate accounts, half of it belongs to just 25 of the 2,000 companies tracked by S&P Global Ratings.  In March 2016, S&P cut its ratings on Macy's to BBB, two notches above junk, as competition from internet retailers continues to dig into the department store chain's sales. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    The hidden risk to the economy in corporate balance sheets

    NEW YORK (AP) — America has a debt problem, but it’s not what you think.

  • Coal towns hit by layoffs to get job grants from US gov’t

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (AP) — Communities in nine U.S. states that have been hard-hit by coal layoffs are being promised more than 3,000 jobs in several industries through a multimillion-dollar federal grant.

  • In this April 18, 2016 file photo, supporters of fair immigration reform dance in front of the Supreme Court in Washington. For more than a decade lawmakers have been pointing to their counterparts to take the blame for what just about everyone agrees is a broken immigration system.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

    Hunting for the root of immigration woes? Look to the past.

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For more than a decade, lawmakers have been pointing at their counterparts to take the blame for what just about everyone agrees is a broken immigration system.