• In this Dec. 11, 2012 file photo, Gov. Rick Snyder speaks in Lansing, Mich. When Snyder disclosed a spike in Legionnaires’ cases in Flint, Mich., on Jan. 13, 2016, he said he had learned about it just a couple days earlier.  Internal emails however show high-ranking officials in Snyder’s administration were aware of a surge in Legionnaires’ disease potentially linked to Flint’s water long before the governor reported the increase to the public last month. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)

    APNewsBreak: Officials warned of water, Legionnaires’ link

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — High-ranking officials in Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder’s administration were aware of a surge in Legionnaires’ disease potentially linked to Flint’s water long before the governor reported the increase to the public last month, internal emails show.

  • In this Feb. 1, 2016 photo, a technician from the British biotec company Oxitec, inspects the pupae of genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, a vector for transmitting the Zika virus, in Campinas, Brazil. The company said tests begun last April as part of a dengue-fighting program in the small southeastern city of Piracicaba suggested the release of the GM males reduced the wild Aedes larvae population in the target neighborhood by more than 80 percent. Brazil is in the midst of a Zika outbreak and authorities say they have also detected a spike in cases of microcephaly in newborn children, but the link between Zika and microcephaly is as yet unproven. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

    British Olympic Association providing guidance on Zika

    LONDON (AP) — The British Olympic Association says it will provide medical guidance to athletes about the Zika virus ahead of the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

  • Mercosur Health Ministers and part of  their delegations pose for an official photo after attending the summit to address the spread of Zika virus in the region, at the Mercosur building in Montevideo, Uruguay, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. The ministers of 13 countries are meeting to coordinate efforts to fight the spread of the mosquito born virus. (AP Photo/Matilde Campodonico)

    Uruguay has ‘no qualms” playing at center of Zika outbreak

    MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (AP) — Uruguay will go ahead with a World Cup qualifier scheduled next month in Recife, the Brazilian city at the center of an outbreak of the Zika virus.

  • Buffalo Sabres, cancer center launch prevention campaign

    BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — The Buffalo Sabres and an upstate cancer center have announced a partnership aimed at helping hockey fans prevent and detect cancer.

  • In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The mosquito behind the Zika virus seems to operate like a heat-driven missile of disease. Scientists say the hotter it gets, the better the mosquito that carries Zika virus is at transmitting a variety of dangerous illnesses. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)

    Health officials want more Zika samples, data from Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil is not sharing enough samples and disease data to let researchers determine whether the Zika virus is, as feared, linked to the increased number of babies born with abnormally small heads in the South American country, U.N. and U.S. health officials say.

  • In this Jan. 30, 2016 photo, Elielson tries to calm down his baby brother Jose Wesley, in Bonito, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Jose Wesley was born with microcephaly and he screams uncontrollably for long stretches, getting red in the face and tightening his already stiff limbs. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    AP photographer reflects on ‘bucket baby’ in Brazil

    RECIFE, Brazil (AP) — The first time I met Solange Ferreira was in December. She was at a hospital, waiting to hear from a doctor whether her baby boy had what so many in her village were talking about — microcephaly, or an abnormally small head that is a sign of severe disabilities and a truncated life-expectancy.

  • In this Aug. 3, 2014 file photo, Pattaramon Chanbua kisses her baby boy Gammy at a hospital in Chonburi province, southeastern Thailand. The newborn Down syndrome baby left by his Australian biological father with his poor surrogate mother in Thailand was one of several cases of surrogate children abandoned because of defects, an expert told a parliamentary inquiry on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. The high-profile case of baby Gammy prompted the Thai government to ban surrogacy in 2014, and an Australian parliamentary committee launched a review of Australia's laws that prohibit commercial surrogacy. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)

    Expert: Parents often won’t take surrogate kids with defects

    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — A newborn Down syndrome baby left by his Australian biological father with his poor surrogate mother in Thailand was one of several cases of surrogate children abandoned because of defects, an expert told a parliamentary inquiry on Thursday.

  • In this Jan. 3, 2016, file photo, Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning (18) and lineman Evan Mathis (69) take the field for an NFL football game against the San Diego Chargers in Denver. Mathis got released by the Philadelphia Eagles because Chip Kelly didn’t want to give the two-time Pro Bowl guard a raise. Now he's blocking for Manning and the Broncos. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey, File)

    Furniture Row Racing on different track for Super Bowl

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Denver-based Furniture Row Racing team is in a precarious position among the teams it competes against in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series.

  • Study: Texas birth control fell after Planned Parenthood cut

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A new study finds that Texas saw a drop in women obtaining long-acting birth control after Republican leaders booted Planned Parenthood from a state women’s health program in 2013, which researchers say may explain an increase in births among some poor families.

  • Brazil's Health Minister Marcelo Castro speaks to the press before attending the Mercosur Health Ministers summit to address the spread of Zika virus in the region, at the Mercosur building in Montevideo, Uruguay, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. The ministers of 13 countries are meeting to coordinate actions to try and fight the spread of the mosquito born virus. Castro said that efforts are being made to create a vaccine against it. (AP Photo/Matilde Campodonico)

    APNewsbreak: Few Zika samples being shared by Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — U.N. and U.S. health officials tell The Associated Press that Brazil has yet to share enough samples and disease data needed to answer the most worrying question about the Zika outbreak: whether the virus is actually responsible for the increase in the number of babies born with abnormally small heads in Brazil.