• In this Aug. 16, 2007, photo provided by Cynthia Wilson, Reba Golden stands outside Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. Golden died on the operating table there the next day during what should have been a routine spinal surgery. Like several other spinal surgery patients before her, Golden died after her surgeon injected bone cement into her spine and some of the material leaked into her blood stream, causing massive clotting. Also like the other patients, Golden was never told that the bone cement was not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. (Cynthia Wilson via AP)

    Bone cement company accused of experimenting on humans

    SEATTLE (AP) — Reba Golden hurt her back after falling two floors while building an addition to her house in Honduras. But when she returned to Seattle for a routine spinal surgery, she suffered blood clots, severe bleeding and died in 2007 on the operating table.

  • In this Dec. 21, 2012 file photo a Tasmanian devil called Big John growls from the confines of his new tree house as he makes his first appearance at the Wild Life Sydney Zoo in Sydney, Australia. The Tasmanian devil is an endangered species due to a mysterious disease that has slashed their numbers in Tasmania's wilderness by as much as 90 percent since it was discovered two decades ago. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith, File)

    Saving devils, in a single disease-free corner of Tasmania

    TASMAN PENINSULA, Australia (AP) — Drive over one narrow isthmus in Tasmania, and then another, and you’ll reach the last place on Earth where wild Tasmanian devils live apart from a contagious cancer that threatens the fearsome marsupials’ existence. Conservationists are doing everything they can to keep it that way.

  • In this May 18, 2016, file  photo, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin walks on the floor of the Oklahoma House in Oklahoma City. Gov. Fallin has vetoed legislation that would make it a felony for doctors to perform an abortion, a measure that would have effectively outlawed the procedure in the state. The Republican governor issued her veto Friday, May 20, 2016, saying the bill was vague and would not withstand a legal challenge. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

    Oklahoma governor vetoes bill criminalizing abortion

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma Republican state senator who authored the bill that would effectively outlaw abortion in the state said Saturday that he hasn’t decided whether he’ll try to override the governor’s veto.

  • In this May 18, 2016, file  photo, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin walks on the floor of the Oklahoma House in Oklahoma City. Gov. Fallin has vetoed legislation that would make it a felony for doctors to perform an abortion, a measure that would have effectively outlawed the procedure in the state. The Republican governor issued her veto Friday, May 20, 2016, saying the bill was vague and would not withstand a legal challenge. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

    Fallin vetoes bill criminalizing performing abortions

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin on Friday vetoed legislation to make it a felony for doctors to perform an abortion, a measure that would have effectively outlawed the procedure in the state.

  • In this May 24, 2012, file photo, United States Olympic Committee  Secretary General Scott Blackmun discusses with the media an agreement between the IOC and the USOC at the SportAccord conference in Quebec City. In an interview Friday, May 20, 2106,  with The Associated Press, Blackmun said if stories of the Russian lab director's elaborate plans to keep the country's athletes from testing positive at the Sochi Games turn out to be true, then, in his words, "we need to admit the system is flawed." (Francis Vachon/The Canadian Press via AP, File) MANDATORY CREDIT

    USOC leader: Flawed anti-doping system needs attention

    The leader of the U.S. Olympic Committee says the latest anti-doping headlines make it “increasingly difficult to defend the current system.”

  • In this  Friday Jan. 16, 2015 file photo, Former France soccer player David Ginola speaks at a press conference to launch his bid to challenge Sepp Blatter for the FIFA presidency, in London. Former France player David Ginola has reportedly been hospitalized after feeling unwell while playing golf on Thursday, May 19, 2016. According to local newspaper Nice Matin, the 49-year-old David Ginola was airlifted unconscious but in stable condition to the Monaco cardiothoracic center after a heart attack. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, file)

    David Ginola expected to fully recover after heart surgery

    PARIS (AP) — The surgeon who operated on David Ginola said the former France winger “almost died” after having a heart attack while playing soccer.

  • This May 11, 2016, photo, shows the outside of CRF Frozen Foods, LLC, in Pasco, Wash. The company shut down its processing operations over a listeria breakout that has sickened customers in several states. (Sarah Gordon/The Tri-City Herald via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL RADIO OUT KONA

    Frozen food recall covers hundreds of items from many stores

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Amid a massive frozen foods recall involving millions of packages of fruits and vegetables that were shipped to all 50 U.S. states, Canada and Mexico, authorities who want to stem the listeria-linked illnesses and deaths worry it’ll be difficult to get consumers to dig through their freezers and check for products they may have bought as far back as 2014.

  • In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The number of pregnant women in the United States infected with Zika virus is suddenly tripling, due to a change in how the government is counting cases.  In a change announced Friday, May 20, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will count all women who tested positive,  regardless of whether they had suffered symptoms.  (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)

    Pregnant women in US with Zika spikes on new counting method

    NEW YORK (AP) — The number of pregnant women in the United States infected with Zika virus is suddenly tripling, due to a change in how the government is reporting cases.

  • New poll shows strong support for paid family leave programs

    CHICAGO (AP) — Time off from work to care for a child or relative is codified in federal law. Now, an overwhelming majority of Americans 40 and older want that time away from the job to be paid.

  • AG’s daughter with Down syndrome trains dogs for service

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Arianna Balderas is proving how puppies and people can form powerful connections to benefit each other — and federal agencies.