• In this Friday, July 8, 2016 photo, a pharmacist holds a package of EpiPens, an epinephrine autoinjector for the treatment of allergic reactions, in Sacramento, Calif. Price hikes for the emergency medicine have made its maker, Mylan, the latest target for patients and politicians infuriated by soaring drug prices. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

    How EpiPen’s maker raised prices, and hackles, so much

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Sky-high price hikes for EpiPen, the injected emergency medicine for severe allergic reactions to foods and bug bites, have made its maker the latest target for patients and politicians infuriated by soaring drug prices.

  • Washington Nationals' Daniel Murphy (20) and Bryce Harper (34) celebrate after the ninth inning of baseball game against the Atlanta Braves, Saturday, Aug. 20, 2016, in Atlanta. Washington won 11-9. (AP Photo/John Amis)

    Nationals OF Harper designs cap to raise money for charity

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Bryce Harper’s many talents now include hat designer.

  • This undated photo released by Florida Hospital Orlando, shows Sebastian DeLeon on a fishing outing. Deleon has survived a brain-eating amoeba that kills most people who contract it, after he was treated at Florida Hospital in Orlando, Fla. Officials say the infection has a fatality rate of 97 percent, and it's often contracted through the nose when swimming in freshwater. (DeLeon Family/Florida Hospital Orlando via AP)

    Teen survives rare amoeba infection that kills most people

    ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A South Florida boy has survived a rare brain-eating amoeba that kills most people, aided in part because a hard-to-get drug to fight the infection is made by a company based in Orlando where he was hospitalized, doctors said Tuesday.

  • Susan Contreras stands next to her bed in a Phoenix-area shelter for victims of domestic violence on Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2016. Contreras is part of a unique program at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix that aims to assist abuse survivors who have suffered head trauma. (AP Photo/Beatriz Costa-Lima)

    Fists not football: Brain injuries seen in domestic assaults

    CHICAGO (AP) — There are no bomb blasts or collisions with burly linemen in Susan Contreras’ past. Her headaches, memory loss and bouts of confused thinking were a mystery until doctors suggested a probable cause: domestic violence.