• Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Aroldis Chapman delivers in this multiple exposure photo during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Chicago White Sox on Thursday, July 28, 2016, in Chicago. Chapman recorded his first save as a Cubs beat the Chicago White Sox 3-1. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Cubs considering new translator for star closer Chapman

    CHICAGO (AP) — The Chicago Cubs are considering bringing in a new Spanish translator for Aroldis Chapman after the star closer from Cuba struggled to answer questions about a past domestic violence case in his introductory news conference.

  • Craig Sager to skip Rio Olympics to fight leukemia

    NEW YORK (AP) — Craig Sager’s fight with leukemia will prevent the basketball sideline reporter form covering the Rio Olympics for NBC.

  • This undated file photo provided by the Franklin County Sheriff's Office in Ohio shows Rayshon LaCarlos Alexander of Columbus, Ohio. Rayshon Alexander was arrested July 11, 2016, and has pleaded not guilty to 20 counts, including murder, following a death and nine other overdoses that investigators say were caused by drugs that buyers thought were heroin, but were actually the animal tranquilizer carfentanil, used to sedate elephants and other large animals. (Franklin County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)

    Elephant sedative emerges as new threat in overdose battle

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A drug used to sedate elephants and other large animals, 100 times as potent as the fentanyl already escalating the country’s heroin troubles, is suspected in spates of overdoses in several states, where authorities say they’ve found it mixed with or passed off as heroin.

  • Therapist shot by police has reunion with autistic client

    AVENTURA, Fla. (AP) — An unarmed black therapist who was shot by police last week while protecting his autistic client had an emotional reunion with the man.

  • Albuquerque health care industry company to add 300 jobs

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — An Albuquerque -based business in the health care industry will add 300 jobs under an expansion.

  • In this Aug. 13, 2014 file photo, workers sit at desks at a call center in the northern border city of Tijuana, Mexico. If you spend all day sitting, then you might want to schedule some time for a brisk walk - just make sure you can spare at least an hour. Scientists analyzing data from more than 1 million people found that it takes about 60 to 75 minutes of “moderate intensity” exercise to undo the damage of sitting for at least eight hours a day. Not exercising and sitting all day is as dangerous as being obese or smoking, they found. (AP Photo/Alex Cossio, File)

    To reverse damage of sitting, take a brisk, hour-long walk

    LONDON (AP) — If you spend all day sitting, then you might want to schedule some time for a brisk walk — just make sure you can spare at least an hour.

  • Additional samples to test for chronic wasting to be taken

    LONDON, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas Game and Fish Commission biologists plan to take additional samples from deer to search for chronic wasting disease in southern Pope County.

  • In this June 14, 2011 file photo, various prescription drugs on the automated pharmacy assembly line at Medco Health Solutions in Willingboro, N.J. A safeguard for Medicare beneficiaries has become a way for drugmakers to get paid billions of dollars for pricey medications at taxpayer expense, government numbers show. The cost of Medicare’s “catastrophic” prescription coverage jumped by 85 percent in three years, from $27.7 billion in 2013 to $51.3 billion in 2015, according to the program’s number-crunching Office of the Actuary.  (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

    Senator: Is Medicare drug plan vulnerable to exploitation?

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A senior senator is examining whether Medicare’s prescription drug benefit is vulnerable to manipulation by pharmaceutical companies that set very high prices for medications.

  • This Oct. 1, 2014, file photo shows a black-footed ferret peeking out of a tube after being brought to a ranch near Williams, Ariz. The endangered weasel is returning to an area of western Wyoming where the critter almost went extinct more than 30 years ago. Biologists plan to release 35 black-footed ferrets Tuesday, July 26, 2016, near Meeteetse, Wyo. Scientists thought the black-footed ferret was extinct until a dog brought a dead one home near Meeteetse in 1981. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)

    Black-footed ferrets return to where they held out in wild

    MEETEETSE, Wyo. (AP) — A nocturnal species of weasel with a robber-mask-like marking across its eyes has returned to the remote ranchlands of western Wyoming where the critter almost went extinct more than 30 years ago.

  • CORRECTS PHOTOGRAPHER TO RANDALL BENTON - Six-year-old Ethan Dean, who was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at two weeks old, rides in a waste truck as his wish to be a garbage man came true for a day in Sacramento, Calif., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Thanks to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, he got to experience what it's like to be a garbage truck driver, riding in a real garbage truck through downtown Sacramento, collecting trash and recyclables, just like he's always wanted. (Randall Benton/Sacramento Bee via AP)

    Wish granted: Six-year-old boy is garbage man for a day

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Ethan Dean has always dreamed of being a garbage man. He never tires of playing with toy garbage trucks and loves to watch the real ones drive past his house.