• Paulo Gadelha, president of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil’s premier state-run research institute for tropical diseases, speaks during a press conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016. Active Zika virus has been found in urine and saliva samples, Gadelha said, cautioning that that further study is needed to determine whether the mosquito-borne virus in those body fluids is capable of infecting people. Gadelha recomended that pregnant women avoid kissing and sharing cutlery, glasses and plates with people who have symptoms of the virus. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    In Brazil, pregnant women urged to be cautious with a kiss

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — A Brazilian health official warned pregnant women to think twice before giving a kiss as global measures mounted Friday against the Zika virus suspected of a link to birth defects.

  • Crime scene tape surrounds a home Friday, Feb. 5, 2016, in Chicago. Chicago police are investigating what led to the deaths of two children, two women and two men whose bodies were found Thursday, with signs of trauma inside the home on the city's South Side. Chicago police Chief of Detective Eugene Roy said Friday morning that the victims appear to be from the same family. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)

    2 children, 2 women, 2 men found dead in Chicago home

    CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago police are investigating what led to the deaths of two children, two women and two men whose bodies were found with signs of trauma inside a home on the city’s South Side.

    Updated: 10:23 am

  • File-This March 3, 2015, file photo shows Florida Gov. Rick Scott emphasizing a point in his State of the State speech on the opening day of a joint session of the legislature in Tallahassee, Fla.  Scott called for more vigilance Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016, against the Zika virus and he said his emergency health declaration for five counties was much like getting ready for hurricane. He sought to assure people that Florida, a hub for cruises and flights to Central and South America where the outbreak is, was safe. (AP Photo/Steve Cannon, File)

    Florida readies for a fight with Zika virus

    MIAMI (AP) — Florida’s history of fighting off mosquito-borne outbreaks puts the state in perhaps better position than most when it comes to the Zika virus.

    Updated: 7:49 am

  • Houston Texans Defensive End J.J. Watt appears at a Super Bowl event promoting the Verizon Virtual Reality Game Winner Experience on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016, in San Francisco. Watt said he’s knows concussions are part of the risk of playing football. (AP Photo/John Carucci)

    J.J. Watt feels concussions are an expected injury

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Houston Texans defensive end J.J. Watt says he knew concussions were a risk when he decided to play football, so he’s not any more alarmed by the studies of prolonged head trauma suffered by NFL players.

  • In this Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016 file photo, a reveler strikes a pose during the Banda de Ipanema carnival block party in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio's over-the-top Carnival is the highlight of the year for many local residents. Hundreds of thousands of merrymakers will take to Rio's streets in hundreds of open-air "bloco" parties. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    For Brazil’s Carnival fans, even Zika can’t stop the party

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazilian Carnival could be called a hungry mosquito’s dream — five days of non-stop street parties that bring together millions of revelers in an inviting mass of bare ankles, uncovered legs and denuded torsos. So the mosquito-borne Zika virus might be expected to dampen this year’s debauchery.

  • A municipal health worker sprays insecticide in an open area of a sports facility, to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquito that transmits the Zika virus, in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. With no hope for a vaccine to prevent Zika in the near future, authorities are focusing on the most effective way to combat the virus: killing the mosquito that carries it. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Brazil minister says no plans to cancel Rio Games

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazilian organizers have reiterated they have no intention of canceling the Rio de Janeiro Olympics because of the outbreak of the Zika virus, with Sports Minister George Hilton saying the topic “is not in discussion.”

    Updated: 10:46 pm

  • Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to be tested for various diseases perch inside a container at the Gorgas Memorial Laboratory in Panama City, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Panamanian authorities announced on Monday that 50 cases of the Zika virus infection have been detected in Panama's sparsely populated Guna Yala indigenous area along the Caribbean coast. The Aedes aegypti mosquito is vector for the spread of the Zika virus. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

    The Latest: US, Colombia to team up on Zika research

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Latest on the mosquito-born Zika virus, which is suspected of causing brain deformities in babies (all times local):

  • A municipal health worker sprays insecticide in an open area of a sports facility, to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquito that transmits the Zika virus, in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. With no hope for a vaccine to prevent Zika in the near future, authorities are focusing on the most effective way to combat the virus: killing the mosquito that carries it. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Brazil health official confirm Zika spread via transfusion

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Two people in southeastern Brazil contracted the Zika virus through blood transfusions, a municipal health official said Thursday, presenting a fresh challenge to efforts to contain the virus on top of the disclosure of a case of sexual transmission in the United States.

  • Sandoval County woman hospitalized with hantavirus

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Health officials say a 37-year-old Sandoval County woman is hospitalized with hantavirus, making New Mexico’s first case this year.

  • New Mexico lawmakers look to curb opioid addiction

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — With one of the highest drug overdose death rates in the nation, New Mexico has been working for years to curb what has now been identified by the highest levels of government as a national epidemic.