• In this Friday, Dec. 18, 2015, photo Syrian refugee Ahmad Alkhalaf, 9, sits on a prayer rug in a mosque in Sharon, Mass. Ahmad, who arrived in the Boston area this past summer for medical treatment, said he used to have restless nights when he would relive his mother’s screams from the night a bomb killed three of his siblings and left him without arms. But those sounds, he said, have largely faded. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

    Refugee mental health needs could overwhelm, experts fear

    BOSTON (AP) — For the thousands of Syrian refugees expected to arrive in the U.S. in coming months, the first order of business will be securing the basics — health care, jobs, education and a safe home.

    Updated: 11:27 pm

  • In this Feb. 5, 2016 photo, a soldier provides security for a Health Ministry worker fumigating against the Aedes aegypti mosquito in the La Comuna 2 neighborhood of Guatemala City. For health workers battling Zika across much of Central America, the immediate menace is not the mosquitoes that transmit the virus. It’s the gangsters who control the streets, and sometimes threaten their lives. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

    In Central America, gangs an obstacle in battle against Zika

    CUSCATANCINGO, El Salvador (AP) — For health workers battling Zika across much of Central America, the immediate menace is not the mosquitoes that transmit the virus. It’s the gangsters who control the streets, and sometimes threaten their lives.

  • China reports 1st case of imported Zika virus

    BEIJING (AP) — China’s first case of the Zika virus has been found in a 34-year-old man who recently traveled to Venezuela and is now making a speedy recovery, the government said Wednesday.

    Updated: 9:34 pm

  • Australia commits to legal growing of medicinal marijuana

    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australian lawmakers committed on Wednesday to legalize the growing of marijuana for medical use within a part of the world renowned for zero-tolerance and harsh penalties for illegal drugs.

    Updated: 9:20 pm

  • US women’s national soccer team to be briefed on Zika virus

    The U.S. women’s national soccer team was scheduled to be briefed Tuesday night on the developing Zika virus crisis in Latin America, a day before the start of the CONCACAF Olympic qualification tournament in Texas.

  • CDC sends Florida 950 kits to test for Zika virus antibodies

    SARASOTA, Fla. (AP) — Federal health officials have sent the state of Florida an additional 950 kits to test for viral antibodies in people who have shown Zika symptoms after traveling to affected countries.

  • Falcons owner Blank to have surgery for prostate cancer

    ATLANTA (AP) — Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank is planning surgery for what he says is a treatable form of prostate cancer.

  • Workers holds a flag that reads in portugues "Out Zika" as part of a campaign to warn people about the spread of the Zika virus during carnival celebrations at the Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    Kenya planning on track for Rio Olympics; No Zika boycott

    NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Kenya is preparing as planned for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics while also monitoring the outbreak of the Zika virus in Brazil, the official in charge of the country’s team said Tuesday.

  • In this Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016 photo, Palestinian cardiovascular surgeon Saleem Haj-Yahia, left, performs open-heart surgery at An-Najah University hospital in the West Bank city of Nablus.  Dr. Haj-Yahia is the first surgeon to perform a successful artificial heart transplant in the West Bank. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)

    Palestinian doctor aims to boost West Bank medical services

    NABLUS, West Bank (AP) — After Dr. Saleem Haj-Yahia performed the first-ever successful artificial heart transplant in the West Bank last month he was greeted with flowers, balloons and cheering crowds and publicly praised by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

  • Greyhound Lines resolves alleged ADA violations

    WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Greyhound Lines has agreed to pay $300,000 to certain bus passengers and a $75,000 civil penalty to resolve allegations that it repeatedly violated the Americans with Disabilities Act.