• In this photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015, nurse Donnell Tholley, 25, holds his adopted son Donnell Junior at their apartment in Freetown, Sierra Leone, as the baby’s great-grandmother Marie looks on. Tholley adopted the boy following the death of the mother Fatu Turay last year from the Ebola virus at the hospital on the outskirts of Freetown, Sierra Leone. The Ebola epidemic killed nearly 4,000 Sierra Leoneans and left thousands of orphans. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

    Young nurse asked to adopt newborn after mom dies of Ebola

    FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — The 19-year-old mother clutched her newborn son as she arrived at the Ebola holding center. The child’s father was gone, and she had no family to help her. She knew she was dying.

  • This image released by Sony Pictures shows the poster art for the film, "Concussion," to be released in U.S. theaters on Christmas Day. Even though the holiday is nearly four months off, we already know what Roger Goodell will find under his tree on Christmas Day. It's a movie scheduled for release that morning based on a true story and bluntly titled "Concussion." It could do for the NFL what "The Insider" did for Big Tobacco and "Erin Brockovich" did for big energy companies. (Sony Pictures via AP)

    Sony says ‘Concussion’ wasn’t softened to placate NFL

    NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly a year after the devastating hacking attack that leaked thousands of emails, Sony Pictures Entertainment again finds itself trying to justify its own inner dealings, this time over the upcoming Will Smith film about head trauma and the NFL, “Concussion.”

  • NYC expands Public Schools Athletic League

    NEW YORK (AP) — An expansion of New York City’s Public Schools Athletic League will emphasize girls’ teams and new teams at small schools.

  • This Aug. 9, 2015 self-portrait shows Michele Saltzman of Bedford, Mass., and Lucas, a 10-year-old beagle she adopted in October, 2014, from a shelter in Vermont. Because Lucas has a heart murmur and fainting spells, she went online and bought a PetPace health collar, which immediately notifies her about any changes in Lucas' vital signs. A wearable collar can tell an owner when a dog is in pain, something even the dog is sometimes not able to do. It’s just what Saltzman needed for Lucas.(Michele Saltzman via AP)

    New collars monitor pets for pain, problems

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — You can use wearables with GPS to keep track of wandering dogs. Others help you track animals’ physical activity.

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014, file photo, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer smiles during a session at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Mayer posted on Tumblr, Monday, Aug. 31, 2015, that she's pregnant with twin girls, due in December. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)

    Yahoo CEO to give birth to twins while tackling turnaround

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer is going to give birth to twins while trying to deliver a long-promised turnaround at the struggling Internet company.

  • In this Sept. 6, 2013 file photo, director Peter Landesman arrives at the premiere of "Parkland" on day 2 of the Toronto International Film Festival at Roy Thomson Hall, in Toronto. A day after its trailer debuted online, the Will Smith football head trauma Sony film “Concussion” is already sparking controversy. In a statement to The Associated Press on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015, the film's director Peter Landesman disputed a New York Times report that "Concussion" was altered to avoid antagonizing the NFL. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

    ‘Concussion’ director says no compromises were made for NFL

    NEW YORK (AP) — A day after its trailer debuted online and months before it hits theaters, the Will Smith football head-trauma film “Concussion” is already sparking controversy.

  • Kansas City Royals' Mike Moustakas (8) is congratulated by on-deck batter Alex Rios (15) after scoring on a single by teammate Salvador Perez during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo., Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

    Kansas City Royals hit by chickenpox

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — All-Star reliever Kelvin Herrera and Royals right fielder Alex Rios have been diagnosed with chickenpox, raising concerns that others on the AL Central leaders may have been exposed.

  • This undated file image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a large grouping of Legionella pneumophila bacteria (Legionnaires' disease). Legionnaires' disease has been reported in a handful of states in the summer of 2015, leading to multiple deaths and more than 100 illnesses. The unrelated cases are part of a typical pattern seen with a disease that tends to appear in warm weather and is mostly dangerous for people who are already sick or weakened. (Janice Haney Carr/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via AP, File)

    Legionnaires’ outbreaks not unusual in summer & early fall

    CHICAGO (AP) — Legionnaires’ disease has been reported in a handful of states this summer, leading to 19 deaths and more than 100 illnesses. The unrelated cases are part of a typical pattern seen with a disease that tends to appear in warm weather and is mostly dangerous for people who already are sick or weakened.

  • New Mexico court schedules arguments on assisted suicide

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico’s highest court is poised to consider the legality of assisted suicide.

  • In this Thursday, June 6, 2013 file photo, a patient has her blood pressure checked by registered nurse in Plainfield, Vt. Your heart might be older than you are, according to a CDC report released Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2015 which takes a new approach to try to spur more Americans to take steps to prevent cardiovascular disease. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

    Young at heart? Not most Americans, government report says

    NEW YORK (AP) — Your heart might be older than you are. A new government report suggests age is just a number — and perhaps not a very telling one when it comes to your risk of heart attack or stroke.