• Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdoganl left, greets Kemal Kilicdaroglu before a meeting n Ankara, Turkey, Monday, July 25, 2016. Erdogan met Monday with leaders of the main opposition parties, Republican People's Party leader Kemal Kilicdaroglu, National Movement Party leader Devlet Bahceli and Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim. The meeting took place amid a government crackdown upon people suspected of links with Fethullah Gulen, a self-exiled cleric that Erdogan blames for the failed coup attempt.(Presidential Press Service, Kayhan Ozer/Pool Photo via AP)

    AP interview: Turkish opposition warns govt about witch hunt

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey’s polarized factions should learn from their mistakes and overcome their antagonism, the main opposition leader said Tuesday, reflecting fragile efforts to reconcile in a shaken country where the opposition has for years accused President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of authoritarianism.

  • People attend Friday prayers in Fatih mosque, Istanbul, Friday July 22, 2016. Turkish lawmakers responded to an attempted coup by approving a three-month state of emergency that allows the government to extend detention times and issue decrees. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    Turkish city streets are calm after emergency declaration

    ISTANBUL (AP) — A top Turkish official on Friday accused the United States of “standing up for savages” by not immediately handing over a U.S.-based Muslim cleric who the government claims orchestrated last week’s failed coup. Speaking in Washington, President Barack Obama said there was a legal process for extradition and encouraged Turkey to present evidence.

  • In this Sunday, May 17, 2015 file photo, a Turkish police officer scans the area from a platform, backdropped by posters of Turkish Republic founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, left, and Turkey's current President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, during a political rally of AKP, The Justice and Development Party in Istanbul. Turkish lawmakers convened Thursday July 22, 2016 to endorse sweeping new powers for Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown in the wake of July 15 failed coup. The 550-member parliament is set to approve Erdogan's request for a three-month state of emergency. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, file)

    Turkish lawmakers set to approve 3-month state of emergency

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey will be able to extend detention times for suspects and issue decrees without parliamentary approval under a three-month state of emergency approved Thursday by lawmakers following last week’s attempted military coup.

  • In this Sunday, May 17, 2015 file photo, a Turkish police officer scans the area from a platform, backdropped by posters of Turkish Republic founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, left, and Turkey's current President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, during a political rally of AKP, The Justice and Development Party in Istanbul. Turkish lawmakers convened Thursday July 22, 2016 to endorse sweeping new powers for Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown in the wake of July 15 failed coup. The 550-member parliament is set to approve Erdogan's request for a three-month state of emergency. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, file)

    The Latest: Turkey detains more judges and military officers

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the situation in Turkey after the failed military coup last week (all times local):

  • A woman takes part in a pro-government rally in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The rebellion, which saw warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, was quashed by loyal government forces and masses of civilians who took to the streets. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    The Latest: Canada urges respect for law in coup aftermath

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the situation in Turkey after the failed military coup last week (all times local):