• West Point prof who called legal scholars treasonous resigns

    WEST POINT, N.Y. (AP) — A West Point professor criticized for writing an article calling some legal scholars treasonous and “lawful targets” for the U.S. military in its war on terrorism has resigned a month after he was hired to teach a law course.

  • Jeff Mizanskey, left, speaks after being released from the Jefferson City Correctional Center, after serving two decades of a life sentence for a marijuana-related charge in Jefferson City, Mo., on Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015.  His release followed years of lobbying by relatives, lawmakers and others who argued that the sentence was too stiff and that marijuana should not be forbidden.   (AP Photo/Columbia Missourian/Justin L. Stewart) MANDATORY CREDIT

    Man who got life for marijuana charge goes free in Missouri

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A man sentenced to life without parole on a marijuana-related charge was freed Tuesday from a Missouri prison after being behind bars for more than two decades — a period in which the nation’s attitudes toward pot steadily softened.

    Updated: 5:38 pm

  • In this Oct. 23, 2008 photo, State Route 9 runs through downtown Springdale, Springdale, a small Utah town outside Zion National Park has repealed a ban on chain restaurants after about a decade of legal battles, clearing the way for one of the country’s biggest fast food chains to open in Springdale amid the village’s mom-and-pop restaurants and cafes.  (Jud Burkett/The Spectrum via AP) NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT

    After legal battle, Utah town to allow chain restaurants

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A small Utah town outside Zion National Park has repealed a ban on chain restaurants, clearing the way for one of the country’s biggest fast food chains to open amid Springdale’s mom-and-pop restaurants.

  • FILE -- In this August 22, file photo, a Lebanese activist holds a poster with pictures of Lebanese Cabinet ministers during a protest against the ongoing trash crisis, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon. To the casual visitor, Lebanon may look like a relative success story: a tiny slice of modernity and coexistence in a turbulent region plagued by violence and extremism _ but the reality is quite different. For residents, it’s a failed state  eaten away by a sectarian political class, and while recent trash protests have challenged that system, others argue it’s what’s allowed a country of 4.5 million people from 18 recognized sects to survive. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein, File)

    Lebanon: Shiny on the outside, rotting from the inside

    BEIRUT (AP) — To the casual visitor, Lebanon may seem like a tiny slice of Mediterranean modernity and coexistence in a turbulent region plagued by violence and extremism.

  • UPDATES CAPTION TO REFLECT JUDGE’S RULING THURSDAY - This June 11, 2015, photo shows a dry water ditch next to a corn field in Cordova, Md. A federal judge in North Dakota on Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015, blocked a new Obama administration, which would have given the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers authority to protect some streams, tributaries and wetlands under the Clean Water Act. The rule was scheduled to take effect Friday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

    EPA: Clean water rule in effect despite court ruling

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency says it is going forward with a new federal rule to protect small streams, tributaries and wetlands, despite a court ruling that blocked the measure in 13 central and Western states.

  • In this Aug. 14, 2015 file photo, water flows through a series of sediment retention ponds built to reduce heavy metal and chemical contaminants from the Gold King Mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about a quarter mile downstream from the mine outside Silverton, Colo. Federal and state regulators underestimated the potential for a toxic blowout from the Colorado mine, despite warnings more than a year earlier that a large-volume spill of wastewater was possible, an internal government investigation released Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015 found. The massive spill occurred on Aug. 5 when a government cleanup crew doing excavation work triggered the release of an estimated 3 million gallons of sludge that fouled hundreds of miles of rivers in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah.  (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

    Investigation: EPA, state missed potential for mine blowout

    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Members of a federal cleanup crew were initially trapped and unable to warn downstream communities that they had accidentally unleashed toxic waste water from a Colorado gold mine, according to government documents released Thursday.

  • In this Aug. 20, 2015 file photo, Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks during a news conference at the Pentagon. New Defense Department guidelines allow commanders to punish journalists and treat them as "unprivileged belligerents" if they believe journalists are sympathizing or cooperating with the enemy.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

    DoD manual allows journalists to be held as ‘belligerents’

    WASHINGTON (AP) — New Defense Department guidelines allow commanders to punish journalists and treat them as “unprivileged belligerents” if they believe journalists are sympathizing or cooperating with the enemy.

  • A man holds a child near the logo for Citic Securities in Beijing on Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015. Employees of state-owned Citic Securities Ltd, one of China's biggest securities firms and one current and one former employee of its market regulator are under investigation on suspicion of illegal stock trading, state media reported Wednesday, amid the collapse of a stock price boom.(AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    China probing brokers, regulators for possible stock crimes

    BEIJING (AP) — Employees of one of China’s biggest securities firms and one current and one former employee of its market regulator are under investigation on suspicion of illegal stock trading, state media reported Wednesday, amid the collapse of a stock price boom.

  • In this July 23, 2015 photo, Efrem Garza stands before his new home built on the lot of his previous house that was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina and holds a photograph taken by a friend of the remains of that house on South Seashore Avenue in Long Beach, Miss. Before the storm Garza was surrounded by houses and trees, now 10 years later, there are only two houses on that land, as few of the residents returned and rebuilt. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

    On Mississippi’s shore, what Katrina erased not yet replaced

    LONG BEACH, Miss. (AP) — Between Mississippi’s seashore and the railroad tracks a little ways inland, where Hurricane Katrina all but erased a neighborhood 10 years ago, Efrem Garza and a handful of other homeowners are still resettling a frontier.