• In this photo taken April 7, 2016, Jonathan Mossberg, whose iGun Technology Corp. is working to develop a "smart gun," poses with the firearm, in Daytona Beach, Fla. Mossberg is among a group of pioneers looking to build a safer gun. But unlike many others, he was in the gun business when he started down that path. Mossberg has been working to develop and someday bring to market a firearm that can't be fired by the wrong person, but works without fail in the hands of its owner in a life-or-death situation.  (AP Photo/Lisa Marie Pane)

    Seeking a high-tech solution to make firearms safer

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Jonathan Mossberg is among a small number of pioneers looking to build a safer gun. But unlike many others, he was in the gun business when he started down that path.

  • In this photo taken April 7, 2016, Jonathan Mossberg, whose iGun Technology Corp. is working to develop a "smart gun," demonstrates the firearm, in Daytona Beach, Fla. Mossberg is among a group of pioneers looking to build a safer gun. But unlike many others, he was in the gun business when he started down that path. Mossberg has been working to develop and someday bring to market a firearm that can't be fired by the wrong person, but works without fail in the hands of its owner in a life-or-death situation.  (AP Photo/Lisa Marie Pane)

    James Bond meets Samuel Colt: Seeking to build a safer gun

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Jonathan Mossberg is among a small number of pioneers looking to build a safer gun. But unlike many others, he was in the gun business when he started down that path.

  • A worker carries spray bottles of gel fuel to help the burning, as he walks past pyres of ivory that were set on fire in Nairobi National Park, Kenya Saturday, April 30, 2016. Kenya's president Saturday set fire to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

    Kenya to burn huge pile of ivory tusks to protest poaching

    NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Kenya’s president set fire Saturday to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement by this East African country against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species.

  • In this Jan. 26, 2014 file photo, violinist Rachel Barton appears at the 56th annual Grammy Awards at Staples Center in Los Angeles. Pine says an American Airlines flight attendant and captain would not allow her violin as a carry-on from Chicago to Albuquerque, N.M. She says federal regulations and the airline’s own policy specifically permit violins as carry-ons. American spokeswoman Leslie Scott says the American Eagle flight captain determined that the instrument could not be safely secured in an overhead bin or under a seat. Barton was rebooked for travel Friday, April 29, 2016, and received an apology from the airline. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

    American Airlines apologizes to musician for barring violin

    FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — A concert musician who was not allowed to board a flight with her violin says she hopes the incident will raise awareness of regulations that permit violins and other small instruments as carry-on luggage.

  • In this March 7, 2016 file photo, Ed Forchion, a pro-marijuana activist dubbed NJ Weedman, stands in front of his Liberty Bell Temple and Sanctuary, next to his Weedman's Joint restaurant in Trenton, N.J. Forchion has been arrested again on marijuana charges after law enforcement raided his restaurant and cannabis temple Wednesday, April 27, 2016. He was arrested along with 10 other people after a raid of his business, officials announced Thursday. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

    NJ Weedman: Officials ‘exaggerated big-time’ in pot charges

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — A New Jersey marijuana advocate dubbed NJ Weedman says authorities “exaggerated big-time” in charging him with distributing pot.

  • In this March 1, 2016 file photo, a University of Michigan equipment truck is parked next to a practice field at IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla. The NCAA’s Division I Board of Directors has rescinded the ban on satellite camps.
The board’s action Thursday, April 28, 2016, comes almost three weeks after the Division I Council approved a proposal prohibiting Bowl Subdivision coaches from holding or working at camps and clinics away from their schools.  (AP Photo/Ralph Russo, File)

    NCAA Board of Directors brings back satellite football camps

    The NCAA Division I Board of Directors scrapped a proposed ban on satellite camps Thursday, rebuffing a request from powerhouse conferences in the South and clearing the way for coaches to hold and work at clinics far from their campuses this summer.

  • NCAA Division I Board of Directors rescinds ban on Football Bowl Subdivision satellite camps

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — NCAA Division I Board of Directors rescinds ban on Football Bowl Subdivision satellite camps.

  • In this April 18, 2016 photo, Jay Wallace, founder of Adventure Outdoors, poses for a portrait in Smyrna, Ga. Wallace was among a group of gun dealers once sued by then-New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg over allegations of allowing illegal sales of firearms. (AP Photo/Lisa Marie Pane)

    Tracking the flow of guns used in crime is inexact science

    SMYRNA, Ga. (AP) — Adventure Outdoors is an 80,000-square-foot store with walls lined with long guns, cases packed with handguns and aisles jammed with all the accessories an avid outdoorsman would need: coolers, clothing, ammo. At the customer service counter is a government-issued poster that warns: “Don’t lie for the other guy.”

  • Volkswagen CEO Matthias Mueller attends the company's annual press conference in Wolfsburg, Germany, Thursday, April 28, 2016. Mueller sketched out a wide-ranging transformation of the company that will see it focus more on electric vehicles and services like car-sharing as it seeks to get past its scandal over cheating on diesel emissions tests. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

    Volkswagen vows to fix diesels, launch new electric vehicles

    FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Volkswagen’s CEO says he apologized in person to U.S. President Barack Obama for the carmaker’s emissions scandal, in which it rigged its cars to cheat on diesel engine pollution tests.

  • In this Friday, April 15, 2016 photo, Geologist Leonard Karr, shows mineral formations inside an abandoned gold mine once exploded by the British, in Egypt's eastern desert, between Luxor and Hurghada. Essential for ancient artifacts like the famed burial mask of Tutankhamun and still highly desired in Middle Eastern culture today, gold has been mined in Egypt for millennia. But experts say the country is heavily underexplored and that modern technology now allows much deeper excavation of the ancient sites shown on Pharaonic treasure maps. If developed, gold and mineral mining could prove a boon to the country at a time it is desperate for foreign currency, and provide jobs for its burgeoning population of 90 million. (AP Photo/Brian Rohan)

    Egypt explorers hunt gold in the desert, following ancients

    EASTERN DESERT, Egypt (AP) — Off the off-road tracks deep in Egypt’s eastern desert, prospectors are ramping up the hunt for the treasure once revered by the Pharaohs as the “skin of the gods” — gold.