• Daily fantasy sports sites aim to make Nevada comeback

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Daily fantasy sports websites that were shut down in Nevada because they didn’t have gambling licenses want to get back in the game, but officials who set policy for the gambling mecca of Las Vegas weren’t impressed.

  • This Jan. 21, 2016 file photo shows tourists looking out on the horizon as their boat searches for dolphins in waters off Waianae, Hawaii. Federal regulators are proposing a widespread ban on swimming with Hawaii's spinner dolphins to allow the nocturnal creatures to rest during the day. The National Marine Fisheries Service proposal announced Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016, would allow some limited exceptions, given dolphins sometimes approach people. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy, File)

    AP NewsBreak: Feds want to ban swimming with Hawaii dolphins

    HONOLULU (AP) — Federal regulators are proposing to ban swimming with dolphins in Hawaii, a move that could imperil one of the Aloha State’s most popular tourist delights and the industry that has sprung up around it.

  • West Virginia permanently halts coal mine by state forest

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia environmental regulators have ordered a company to stop mining permanently at a surface coal mine near Kanawha State Forest.

  • In this Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015 file photo, amusement device inspector Avery Wheelock inspects the safety pins on a children's merry-go-round at the Mississippi State Fair in Jackson, Miss. In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

    Thrill-ride accidents spark new demands for regulation

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over.

  • Correction: Harley-Defeat Device story

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story Aug. 19 about Harley-Davidson’s $15 million air-pollution settlement with federal regulators, The Associated Press reported erroneously the reason more than 12,000 motorcycles had been found out of compliance with federal clean air regulations. The bikes were in violation because they were sold without required environmental certifications, not because they were modified with the suspect tuners also at issue in the settlement.

  • In this April 29, 2015 photo, a woman uses her smartphone near a booth for the Chinese Internet company Tencent at the Global Mobile Internet Conference in Beijing. Chinese state media reported Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016, that new rules hold chief editors of news websites personally liable for content, months after several portals posted material that was seen as embarrassing to President Xi Jinping. Tencent, one of China's most popular websites, fired its top editor after a July headline mistakenly said Xi delivered a "furious" - instead of "important" - speech commemorating a Communist Party anniversary. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

    China tightens control of online news after sensitive gaffes

    BEIJING (AP) — The Chinese government is holding chief editors of news websites personally liable for content, months after several portals posted material that was seen as embarrassing to President Xi Jinping.

  • Indianapolis 500 champion Alexander Rossi, left, visits Fort Worth police headquarter on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016. (Khampha Bouaphanh/Star-Telegram via AP)

    IndyCar drivers will honor police when they resume at Texas

    FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — IndyCar drivers will have “Back The Blue” decals on their cars and wear caps representing local police and national law enforcement agencies when they resume their rain-interrupted race at Texas Motor Speedway on Aug. 27.