• Brodeur jersey festivities includes NJ photography program

    JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) — Martin Brodeur vividly recalls being an impromptu go-fer for his late father, Denis, a renowned sports photographer in Canada.

  • AG: No pattern of fraud found with 10 nonprofit providers

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Ten nonprofits that had provided behavioral health services to needy New Mexicans were cleared Monday of fraud allegations as part of an investigation by the attorney general’s office, but state officials maintain there was still public money that was misspent.

    Updated: 11:45 am

  • Budget bill considered in New Mexico Legislature

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico’s Republican-led House of Representatives voted to approve a $6.3 billion budget that increases spending on Medicaid health care, early childhood education and prisons while cutting funding to state colleges and universities.

  • Downsized New Mexico budget set to House for vote

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A $6.3 billion state budget with spending increases dominated by Medicaid, public schools and the state prison system is moving to the full House of Representatives for deliberations.

  • Study: Texas birth control fell after Planned Parenthood cut

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A new study finds that Texas saw a drop in women obtaining long-acting birth control after Republican leaders booted Planned Parenthood from a state women’s health program in 2013, which researchers say may explain an increase in births among some poor families.

  • Kentucky signs 25 prospects, including 5 in-state players

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky coach Mark Stoops didn’t flinch, saying his fourth recruiting class is his best ever.

  • Kentucky signs 25 prospects, including 5 in-state players

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky coach Mark Stoops didn’t flinch, saying his fourth recruiting class is his best ever.

  • Medicaid edges out political agendas in New Mexico

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Rising health care costs linked to the expansion of Medicaid in New Mexico combined with faltering state revenues are crowding out initiatives sought by Gov. Susana Martinez.

  • This Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015 file photo shows New York attorney Matthew Barge addressing the Cleveland City Council Safety Committee, in Cleveland.  The Cleveland police department must devise a new policy on use of force and have officers trained to implement it by the end of 2016, according to the first-year plan for a consent decree aimed at reforming the troubled Cleveland police department. The monitoring team hired to oversee the consent decree was scheduled to submit the first-year plan to U.S. District Court Judge Solomon Oliver Jr. on Monday, Feb.1, 2016. Barge, who heads the monitoring team, said the first-year plan was devised with the support and collaboration of Cleveland. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)

    Monitor to submit 1st-year plan for Cleveland police reform

    CLEVELAND (AP) — The city must devise a new use-of-force policy and have officers trained to implement it by the end of 2016, according to the first-year plan for a consent decree aimed at reforming the troubled Cleveland Police Department.