• Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • West Virginia permanently halts coal mine by state forest

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia environmental regulators have ordered a company to stop mining permanently at a surface coal mine near Kanawha State Forest.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • In this Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015 file photo, amusement device inspector Avery Wheelock inspects the safety pins on a children's merry-go-round at the Mississippi State Fair in Jackson, Miss. In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

    Thrill-ride accidents spark new demands for regulation

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — In a story Aug. 22 about the lack of unified regulation for amusement park rides, The Associated Press erroneously reported which states have no laws regulating the industry. Montana was omitted from the list, which also includes Alabama, Mississippi, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. It also incorrectly included South Dakota, which passed a law requiring inspections in 2014.

  • In this Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, file photo, the American flag flies above the Wall Street entrance to the New York Stock Exchange. Stocks were moving mostly lower in early trading Monday, Aug. 22, 2016, as investors looked ahead to the Fed’s meeting in Jackson Hole, Wyo., for clues on timing for possible interest rate hikes. A drop in oil prices pulled energy companies lower, along with the broader market. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    Stocks fall in early trading as oil prices decline

    HONG KONG (AP) — Most stock markets in Asia moved sideways on Tuesday as the summer doldrums and a lack of economic data ahead of a widely anticipated speech by the Fed chief kept investors on the sidelines.

  • This undated photo provided by Institute of International Finance shows Charles Collyns. Collyns is the chief economist at the Institute of International Finance. Collyns spoke to The Associated Press about China's currency weakness and the strength of the country's economy. (Institute of International Finance via AP)

    Q&A: Former Treasury official Collyns on China’s currency

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A year ago, the People’s Bank of China jolted financial markets by devaluing the Chinese currency. Investors were rattled again when China’s yuan — also called the renminbi, or RMB — dropped last fall. They worried that China’s economy was weaker than anyone thought and that Beijing was driving down the currency to make the country’s exports more affordable overseas.

  • In this Aug. 12, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gives a thumbs up as he leaves a campaign rally in Altoona, Pa. While Donald Trump's chief economic pitch is decrying foreign trade, the audience for his argument is shrinking by the day in the state most pivotal to his shot at the presidency. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

    In North Carolina, audience shrinking for Trump’s message

    ASHEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — Hillary Clinton “owes the state of North Carolina a very big apology,” Donald Trump thundered, condemning the loss of manufacturing jobs due to free-trade deals supported by the Democratic presidential nominee.

  • In this Aug. 4, 2016 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks during a news conference at the Pentagon. President Barack Obama returns from vacation rested and ready for a busy fall, including pressing Congress for Zika funding and fending off congressional attacks over the administration's $400 million "leverage" payment to Iran. Obama also plans a dogged effort to help elect Democrat Hillary Clinton as president.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Obama is down to the final hours of his summer vacation

    EDGARTOWN, Mass. (AP) — President Barack Obama is returning from vacation rested and ready for a busy fall, including pressing Congress for money to protect against the Zika virus and fending off lawmakers’ attacks over the administration’s $400 million “leverage” payment to Iran.

  • Farmers seek tax credit for donations to food pantries

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Each year New York farmers give millions of pounds of apples, squash, corn or other agricultural products to the state’s food banks. Now they’re looking to get some credit for those good deeds — a tax credit.

  • In this April 29, 2015 photo, a woman uses her smartphone near a booth for the Chinese Internet company Tencent at the Global Mobile Internet Conference in Beijing. Chinese state media reported Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016, that new rules hold chief editors of news websites personally liable for content, months after several portals posted material that was seen as embarrassing to President Xi Jinping. Tencent, one of China's most popular websites, fired its top editor after a July headline mistakenly said Xi delivered a "furious" - instead of "important" - speech commemorating a Communist Party anniversary. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

    China tightens control of online news after sensitive gaffes

    BEIJING (AP) — The Chinese government is holding chief editors of news websites personally liable for content, months after several portals posted material that was seen as embarrassing to President Xi Jinping.