• In this May 18, 2016, file  photo, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin walks on the floor of the Oklahoma House in Oklahoma City. Gov. Fallin has vetoed legislation that would make it a felony for doctors to perform an abortion, a measure that would have effectively outlawed the procedure in the state. The Republican governor issued her veto Friday, May 20, 2016, saying the bill was vague and would not withstand a legal challenge. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

    Oklahoma governor vetoes bill criminalizing abortion

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma Republican state senator who authored the bill that would effectively outlaw abortion in the state said Saturday that he hasn’t decided whether he’ll try to override the governor’s veto.

  • UND baseball team set to play final game in program history

    GRAND FORKS, N.D. (AP) — The University of North Dakota men’s baseball team is about to become history.

  • In this May 18, 2016, file  photo, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin walks on the floor of the Oklahoma House in Oklahoma City. Gov. Fallin has vetoed legislation that would make it a felony for doctors to perform an abortion, a measure that would have effectively outlawed the procedure in the state. The Republican governor issued her veto Friday, May 20, 2016, saying the bill was vague and would not withstand a legal challenge. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

    Fallin vetoes bill criminalizing performing abortions

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin on Friday vetoed legislation to make it a felony for doctors to perform an abortion, a measure that would have effectively outlawed the procedure in the state.

  • U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew talks to reporters during a press briefing in Sendai, northern Japan, Friday, May 20, 2016. Top finance officials of the Group of Seven industrialized economies kicked off their two-day meeting over discussions on revitalizing the global economy on Friday. (AP Photo/Elaine Kurtenbach)

    G-7 finance leaders seek to reassure on global economy

    AKIU, Japan (AP) — Having agreed to only tacit coordination of their varying strategies for boosting growth, financial leaders of the Group of Seven major economies turned Saturday to housekeeping issues such as terrorist financing, tax evasion and support for fighting pandemics.

  • This May 11, 2016, photo, shows the outside of CRF Frozen Foods, LLC, in Pasco, Wash. The company shut down its processing operations over a listeria breakout that has sickened customers in several states. (Sarah Gordon/The Tri-City Herald via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL RADIO OUT KONA

    Frozen food recall covers hundreds of items from many stores

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Amid a massive frozen foods recall involving millions of packages of fruits and vegetables that were shipped to all 50 U.S. states, Canada and Mexico, authorities who want to stem the listeria-linked illnesses and deaths worry it’ll be difficult to get consumers to dig through their freezers and check for products they may have bought as far back as 2014.

  • This Friday, March 11, 2016, photo, shows the Mar-A-Lago Club, owned by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, in Palm Beach, Fla. Trump has been trying for two decades through the Federal Aviation Administration and the courts to force departing airliners from Palm Beach International Airport to turn before reaching the historic and exclusive 17-acre estate, which is 2.5 miles east of the airport's primary runway. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

    A President Trump could trump his club’s fight over planes

    PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Donald Trump doesn’t like jetliners from Palm Beach International Airport flying over his prized Mar-a-Lago Club. A president Trump would have the power to divert them — but would he?

  • In this Wednesday, July 29, 2015, file photo, a bronze statue of San Juan Bautista stands in front of Puerto Rico’s Capitol as U.S. and Puerto Rican flags fly in San Juan, Puerto Rico. After months of pleading from the government of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Congress agreed on Wednesday, May 18, 2016, to help the territory restructure its massive public debt. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo, File)

    Relief and anger in Puerto Rico as Congress acts on debt

    SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — After months of pleading from Puerto Rico’s government, the U.S. Congress has agreed to help the territory restructure its massive public debt. But it comes at a steep cost: a degree of lost sovereignty with the imposition of a fiscal control board as well as a potential lower minimum wage for young workers on the island.

  • Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., embraces Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 19, 2016, during a news conference to discuss bipartisan legislation to improve the federal regulation of chemicals and toxic substances. Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del. is at right. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Congress reaches deal to overhaul chemical regulation

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan agreement reached by House and Senate negotiators would set new safety standards for asbestos and other dangerous chemicals, including tens of thousands that have gone unregulated for decades.

  • House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks during her weekly news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 19, 2016. In a breakthrough, House Republicans and Democrats have agreed to a deal to help rescue Puerto Rico from $70 billion in debt.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Bipartisan deal in House to help Puerto Rico with $70B debt

    WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans and Democrats reached a rare, election-year deal with the White House to try to rescue Puerto Rico from $70 billion in debt as millions of Americans in the cash-strapped U.S. territory struggle with the loss of basic services.

  • People walk past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, May 19, 2016. World stock markets sank Thursday after the Fed surprised investors by signaling that an interest rate hike is in the cards if economic conditions keep improving. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

    Stocks fall after Fed signals June rate hike possible

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Asian stock markets drifted slightly higher on Friday as investors restored calm a day after worries about the Fed’s rate hike signals prompted sell-offs.