• Correction: Water Park-Fatality-Regulation story

    TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — In a story Aug. 12 about the regulation in Kansas for amusement park rides, The Associated Press erroneously reported that South Dakota was among the states that have no laws regulating the industry. South Dakota passed a law requiring inspections in 2014.

  • In this Nov. 21, 2013, file photo, with the Empire State building in the background, the Macy's logo is illuminated on the front of the department store in New York. It turns out there’s a wealth gap among companies, just like among people. Of the $1.8 trillion in cash that’s sitting in U.S. corporate accounts, half of it belongs to just 25 of the 2,000 companies tracked by S&P Global Ratings.  In March 2016, S&P cut its ratings on Macy's to BBB, two notches above junk, as competition from internet retailers continues to dig into the department store chain's sales. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    The hidden risk to the economy in corporate balance sheets

    NEW YORK (AP) — America has a debt problem, but it’s not what you think.

  • Utah jumps back into race to attract Facebook data center

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A Salt Lake City suburb vying against a New Mexico town to attract a Facebook data center said Wednesday it’s restarting negotiations with the company a day after the deal broke down over a contentious $240 million tax-break package.

    Updated: 4:17 pm

  • Sen. Reid wants Raiders in Vegas; mum on public financing

    RENO, Nev. (AP) — Sen. Harry Reid says he’s a big fan of efforts to lure the NFL’s Raiders to Las Vegas but is keeping mum on whether he thinks taxpayers should help foot the bill for a new football stadium.

  • Coal towns hit by layoffs to get job grants from US gov’t

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (AP) — Communities in nine U.S. states that have been hard-hit by coal layoffs are being promised more than 3,000 jobs in several industries through a multimillion-dollar federal grant.

    Updated: 1:42 pm

  • New Mexico governor reiterates opposition to tax increase

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez will not consider any tax increases as the state seeks to close a projected budget shortfall during an upcoming special session of the Legislature, her spokesman reiterated Monday.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • West Virginia permanently halts coal mine by state forest

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia environmental regulators have ordered a company to stop mining permanently at a surface coal mine near Kanawha State Forest.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • In this Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015 file photo, amusement device inspector Avery Wheelock inspects the safety pins on a children's merry-go-round at the Mississippi State Fair in Jackson, Miss. In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

    Thrill-ride accidents spark new demands for regulation

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — In a story Aug. 22 about the lack of unified regulation for amusement park rides, The Associated Press erroneously reported which states have no laws regulating the industry. Montana was omitted from the list, which also includes Alabama, Mississippi, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. It also incorrectly included South Dakota, which passed a law requiring inspections in 2014.