• In this July 19, 2016 photo, patient Penina Pierre sits alone in a dermatology ward, her bandaged foot propped on a chair, at the Hospital of the State University of Haiti, in Port-au-Prince. Across Haiti, a punishing strike by doctors and interns will soon enter its fourth month. Visiting missionaries are keeping her fed since she has no family. "Maybe someday the doctors will come back," Pierre said. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

    Punishing strike by resident doctors grinds on in Haiti

    PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — Empty halls buzz with flies. Rats scamper through the wards at night. The emergency room is empty except for four shackled prisoners, watched over by relatives and missionaries rather than medical personnel.

  • In this photo taken Thursday, July 21, 2016, farmer John Lavoie walks through drying strawberry patch in Hollis, N.H. Parts of the Northeast are in the grips of a drought that has led to water restrictions, wrought havoc on gardens and raised concerns among farmers. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    West Coast style weather strikes Northeastern US

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — At Lavoie’s Farm in New Hampshire, beans and corn haven’t broken through the ground yet and fields of strawberries are stunted.

    Updated: 4:31 pm

  • In this June 14, 2011 file photo, various prescription drugs on the automated pharmacy assembly line at Medco Health Solutions in Willingboro, N.J. A safeguard for Medicare beneficiaries has become a way for drugmakers to get paid billions of dollars for pricey medications at taxpayer expense, government numbers show. The cost of Medicare’s “catastrophic” prescription coverage jumped by 85 percent in three years, from $27.7 billion in 2013 to $51.3 billion in 2015, according to the program’s number-crunching Office of the Actuary.  (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

    AP Exclusive: Medicare safeguard overwhelmed by pricey drugs

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A safeguard for Medicare beneficiaries has become a way for drugmakers to get paid billions of dollars for pricey medications at taxpayer expense, government numbers show.

  • G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors prepare for a group photo session in Chengdu in Southwestern China's Sichuan province, Sunday, July 24, 2016. Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors of the 20 most developed economies met in the southwestern city of Chengdu ahead of a G20 leaders meeting in September hosted by China. Participants in the front row are, from left are: World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, an unidentified member, Turkey's Deputy Prime Minister Mehmet Simsek, China's Finance Minister Lou Jiwei, China's People's Bank of China Governor Zhou Xiaochuan and Germany's Federal Minister of Finance Wolfgang Schauble. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, Pool)

    G20 countries pledge to boost growth, dampen Brexit shock

    BEIJING (AP) — Global finance officials promised Sunday to protect the world economy from the shockwaves of Britain’s European Union referendum and to boost sluggish growth.

  • In this Feb. 13, 2014, file photo, a worker attaches a banner to a scaffolding in New Orleans in preparation of the NBA All-Star basketball game. The league took the 2017 game out of Charlotte on Thursday, July 21, 2016,  because of its objections to a North Carolina law that limits anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay and transgender people. As the NBA looks for a new home for the 2017 All-Star Game, cities are lining up with open arms to welcome LeBron James, Stephen Curry and the hundred million or so dollars they would bring to the local economy. New Orleans is the favorite, with one official familiar with the discussions telling The Associated Press that the league and city are “deep in negotiations” to stage the game there for a third time.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

    Blame game follows NBA’s removal of Charlotte All-Star game

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NBA All-Star Game’s exit from North Carolina because of a law limiting protections for LGBT people represents some of the worst publicity yet for Republican Gov. Pat McCrory’s re-election campaign, even as he dismisses the move as political correctness gone too far.

  • Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., listens to community leaders at a roundtable discussion on religious freedom with the regional interfaith community at All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Mosque in Sterling, Va., Thursday, July 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Kaine liberal appeal muted by energy ties, abortion concerns

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine are closely aligned on many issues, but Kaine’s cautious, left-leaning political profile in a closely contested state is blurred by his ties to energy industry interests and his personal qualms over abortion.

  • People walk past an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Thursday, July 21, 2016. Asian shares were higher Thursday as Japan's benchmark rose on hopes of Japanese government stimulus spending and better-than-expected earnings lifted Wall Street. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

    Asian shares down as central banks wait and see

    LONDON (AP) — Stock markets turned higher on Friday after surveys suggested the eurozone economy is proving resilient to the uncertainty surrounding Britain’s Brexit vote. A big drop in business activity in the U.K. raised expectations of more central bank stimulus there.

  • In this July 7, 2016 photo, a police officer runs for cover during an exchange of gunfire with drug traffickers at the "pacified" Alemao slum complex in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Half a dozen officers had entrenched themselves behind a cable car station while they shot it out with suspected drug traffickers in the sprawling cluster of slums in north Rio. Shootouts erupt daily, even in slums where community policing programs had successfully rewritten the narrative in recent years. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Rio security push crumbles as murders, police killings rise

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — On the eve of hosting the world’s largest sporting event, Rio de Janeiro’s decade-long push to curb violence in hundreds of slums appears to be crumbling.

  • This photo combo shows signage for health insurers Humana Inc., Aetna Inc., Cigna Corp., and Anthem Inc. On Thursday, July 21, 2016, federal regulators said they are suing to stop two major health insurance mergers because they say the deals will increase health care costs for Americans and lower the quality of care they get. The Department of Justice said that the combinations of Aetna and Humana and Anthem and Cigna would hurt competition that restrains the price of coverage and reduce benefits, among other drawbacks. (AP Photo)

    Feds say health mergers would increase costs, threaten care

    WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) — The U.S. government is suing to stop two major health insurance mergers, a move regulators say is needed to protect Americans from potential cost hikes and lower quality care.

  • Fund manager Q&A: What to expect from your bond fund

    NEW YORK (AP) — How many more times can bond funds ride to the rescue when stocks go on another one of their tumbles?