• File - In this May 19, 2012 file photo, a Palestinian throws a stone at an armed Jewish settler during clashes between Palestinians and Jewish settlers in the West Bank village of Assira al-Kibliya. A firebombing last month on a West Bank home, killed an 18-month-old toddler, Ali Dawabsheh, and his father, Saed, and critically wounded his mother and 4-year-old brother. In the wake of the attack, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pledged "zero tolerance" for what he called Jewish terrorism. (AP Photo/Nasser Ishtayeh, File)

    Israel has failed to reform Jewish radicals, critics charge

    SHIR HADASH OUTPOST, West Bank (AP) — The Israeli government initiative has a soothing biblical name, the Hebrew Shepherd, and a serious aim: to keep ultranationalist Jewish settler youths from turning to violence and attacking Palestinians and their property.

    Updated: 8:56 am

  • In this Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, file photo, Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer listens during a meeting of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System at the Federal Reserve in Washington. Fischer said Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, that incoming economic data and market developments will likely determine whether the Fed boosts interest rates in September. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    Fed Vice Chair Fischer keeps open possibility of Sept. hike

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer left the door open Saturday for a Fed rate increase in September, saying the factors that have kept inflation below the central bank’s target level have likely begun to fade.

  • In this Oct. 23, 2008 photo, State Route 9 runs through downtown Springdale, Springdale, a small Utah town outside Zion National Park has repealed a ban on chain restaurants after about a decade of legal battles, clearing the way for one of the country’s biggest fast food chains to open in Springdale amid the village’s mom-and-pop restaurants and cafes.  (Jud Burkett/The Spectrum via AP) NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT

    After legal battle, Utah town to allow chain restaurants

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A small Utah town outside Zion National Park has repealed a ban on chain restaurants, clearing the way for one of the country’s biggest fast food chains to open amid Springdale’s mom-and-pop restaurants.

  • FILE -- In this August 22, file photo, a Lebanese activist holds a poster with pictures of Lebanese Cabinet ministers during a protest against the ongoing trash crisis, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon. To the casual visitor, Lebanon may look like a relative success story: a tiny slice of modernity and coexistence in a turbulent region plagued by violence and extremism _ but the reality is quite different. For residents, it’s a failed state  eaten away by a sectarian political class, and while recent trash protests have challenged that system, others argue it’s what’s allowed a country of 4.5 million people from 18 recognized sects to survive. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein, File)

    Lebanon: Shiny on the outside, rotting from the inside

    BEIRUT (AP) — To the casual visitor, Lebanon may seem like a tiny slice of Mediterranean modernity and coexistence in a turbulent region plagued by violence and extremism.

  • UPDATES CAPTION TO REFLECT JUDGE’S RULING THURSDAY - This June 11, 2015, photo shows a dry water ditch next to a corn field in Cordova, Md. A federal judge in North Dakota on Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015, blocked a new Obama administration, which would have given the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers authority to protect some streams, tributaries and wetlands under the Clean Water Act. The rule was scheduled to take effect Friday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

    EPA: Clean water rule in effect despite court ruling

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency says it is going forward with a new federal rule to protect small streams, tributaries and wetlands, despite a court ruling that blocked the measure in 13 central and Western states.

  • Andrew Silverman, left, and a fellow trader work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015. U.S. stocks closed sharply higher after China's main stock index logged its biggest gain in eight weeks.  The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 369.26 points, or 2. 3 percent, to 16,654.77. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    US stocks rise after Chinese market surges

    HONG KONG (AP) — Asian stocks rose Friday as upbeat U.S. economic data lifted investors’ spirits following days of stomach-churning turbulence sparked by a heavy sell-off in China.

  • In this Aug. 14, 2015 file photo, water flows through a series of sediment retention ponds built to reduce heavy metal and chemical contaminants from the Gold King Mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about a quarter mile downstream from the mine outside Silverton, Colo. Federal and state regulators underestimated the potential for a toxic blowout from the Colorado mine, despite warnings more than a year earlier that a large-volume spill of wastewater was possible, an internal government investigation released Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015 found. The massive spill occurred on Aug. 5 when a government cleanup crew doing excavation work triggered the release of an estimated 3 million gallons of sludge that fouled hundreds of miles of rivers in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah.  (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

    Investigation: EPA, state missed potential for mine blowout

    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Members of a federal cleanup crew were initially trapped and unable to warn downstream communities that they had accidentally unleashed toxic waste water from a Colorado gold mine, according to government documents released Thursday.

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015 photo Erin Stennis poses for a photo in Los Angeles. Stennis helped a lawmaker pass legislation allowing California taxpayers to donate to colon cancer prevention after her husband died of the disease in 2003. Stennis says it's a missed opportunity that the state hasn't spent any of the  donations on cancer awareness a decade after the legislation passed. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

    AP EXCLUSIVE: California tax donations lost in bureaucracy

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Nearly $10 million in charitable donations by California taxpayers sat unspent in government accounts at the end of last year, The Associated Press has found, and the Senate Governance and Finance Committee chairman said Thursday that he wants a review of state accounts and will hold a hearing to find out why the money hasn’t been spent.

  • Lawmaker opposition casts doubt on new St. Louis stadium

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri’s legislative budget leaders said they oppose spending taxpayer money on a new St. Louis football stadium, casting serious doubts on whether supporters can cobble together enough money for the facility before an approaching NFL vote on whether to relocate the Rams.

  • Whistleblower wants possible tax scam victims warned

    LAS CRUCES, N.M. (AP) — The whistleblower in a county tax scam wants county commissioners to warn the potential victims.