• In this Oct. 11, 2011 photo, the damaged Vermont State Hospital is seen in Waterbury, Five years after flooding from Tropical Storm Irene forced the closing of the Vermont State Hospital in Waterbury, much of the system has been rebuilt, but challenges remain. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, file)

    After Irene forces reckoning, mental health care rebuilt

    MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — For most Vermonters, Tropical Storm Irene was a disaster that tore roads, communities and lives apart. But for many of the state’s neediest mental health patients, it was a blessing in disguise.

  • In this Feb. 12, 2015 file photo, the Port of Los Angeles, with some cargo loading cranes in the upright and idle position, are seen in this view from the San Pedro area of Los Angeles. In this angry election year, many American voters are skeptical about free trade, or hostile to it. The backlash threatens a pillar of U.S. policy: The United States has long sought global trade. Economists say imports cut prices for consumers and make the U.S. more efficient. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

    WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A selection of issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans, in brief:

  • An honor guard stands vigil over Bolivia's Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs Rodolfo Illanes lying in state, inside the government palace in La Paz, Bolivia Friday, Aug. 26, 2016. Striking Bolivian miners kidnapped and beat to death Illanes Thursday, in a shocking spasm of violence following weeks of tension over dwindling paychecks in a region hit hard by falling metal prices. The miners were demanding they be allowed to work for private companies, who promise to put more cash in their pockets. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

    Striking miners kidnap, kill deputy minister in Bolivia

    LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — President Evo Morales and his political opponents traded recriminations Friday over the shocking beating death of a high-ranking government official by protesting miners who had blockaded a highway.

  • Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, center, strolls with Stanley Fischer, right, vice chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, and Bill Dudley, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, before her speech to the annual invitation-only conference of central bankers from around the world, at Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park, north of Jackson Hole, Wyo., Friday, Aug 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Yellen suggests rate hike is coming but offers no timetable

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the case for raising interest rates has strengthened in light of a solid job market and an improved outlook for the U.S. economy and inflation. But she stopped short of offering any timetable.

  • New Mexico regulators want more info from PNM in rate case

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico utility regulators want to reopen hearings on a proposal by the state’s largest electric provider to raise customer rates.

  • Docs ask feds to probe use of live animals at USC med school

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The emergency-medicine training program at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine violates federal law by using live animals, according to a complaint filed Thursday by a doctors group that seeks alternatives to using animals in medical education and research.

  • Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa, Fla., Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. (Loren Elliott/The Tampa Bay Times via AP)

    WHY IT MATTERS: Trade

    WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: In this angry election year, many American voters are deeply skeptical about free trade — or downright hostile to it.

  • In this Thursday, July 21, 2016, file photo, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi speaks during a news conference in Frankfurt, Germany, after a meeting of the governing council. The Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan have pumped trillions of dollars into global financial markets and taken the radical step of pushing interest rates below zero in Europe and Japan. But the results have been lackluster. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)

    Bold moves, tepid gains: Have central banks met their limit?

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The world’s key central banks have worked themselves into contortions to try to rev up economic growth, raise inflation and coax consumers and businesses to borrow and spend more.

  • Correction: Water Park-Fatality-Regulation story

    TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — In a story Aug. 12 about the regulation in Kansas for amusement park rides, The Associated Press erroneously reported that South Dakota was among the states that have no laws regulating the industry. South Dakota passed a law requiring inspections in 2014.

  • In this Nov. 21, 2013, file photo, with the Empire State building in the background, the Macy's logo is illuminated on the front of the department store in New York. It turns out there’s a wealth gap among companies, just like among people. Of the $1.8 trillion in cash that’s sitting in U.S. corporate accounts, half of it belongs to just 25 of the 2,000 companies tracked by S&P Global Ratings.  In March 2016, S&P cut its ratings on Macy's to BBB, two notches above junk, as competition from internet retailers continues to dig into the department store chain's sales. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    The hidden risk to the economy in corporate balance sheets

    NEW YORK (AP) — America has a debt problem, but it’s not what you think.